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Fixing a flinch...

Discussion in 'Strategies, Tactics, and Training' started by TheMerryMortician, Aug 12, 2012.

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  1. TheMerryMortician

    TheMerryMortician Member

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    Just something interesting I thought I'd share...

    For the past couple years, I've noticed that although I am very proficient with my array of 9mm's, which over the years have been narrowed down to a S&W 3913 for daily carry, I have never been quite as good with my .45 H&K USP Compact. T'was such a shame, because it's such a nice defensive firearm. I didn't carry it, for sake of the fact that I didn't think I was accurate enough to use it effectively should I ever need it.

    After speaking with my lil' brother, he mentioned practicing with snap-caps randomly inserted. Hundreds of rounds later, the leaning in and shot anticipation was gone. Added benefit: Clearing malfunctions like a PRO!

    Feels gone to do something right once in a while!:)
     
  2. Al Thompson

    Al Thompson Moderator Emeritus

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    Obviously, the ball and dummy drill works. I'm just impressed some one in Poland is rocking a S&W 3913!
     
  3. tightgroup tiger

    tightgroup tiger Member

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    Sounds like your doing it right. I've shot revolvers my whole life. I just, 4 years ago, started with my first 9mm semi-auto and still after 4 years of shooting, can I get a 4" group at 25yds like I can with my old S&W .357 mag that is 57 yrs old.

    Very frustrating!

    I don't know what I'm doing wrong, unless I need a better 9mm. I wish I could afford a H&K.

    I'm looking at a Springfield XDM 9mm but I don't know if a 9mm is capable of that kind of accuracy anyways. I just don't have enought experience with them to know. They probably are but not with me shooting them.

    It pisses me off because my old S&W .357mags will do 4" groups @ 25yds, all day long with me behind them, but I can only get maybe 3, 1" bulleyes out of 10 shots at 7yds with my SR9. I can drill them with my revolvers.

    I'm making myself mad. enough said.
     
  4. ETH77

    ETH77 Member

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    Hitting at distance

    You didn't say if you're shooting polymer or steel. If you're used to the feel of a revolver, then the feel you get with a polymer gun may confuse your muscle memory.

    When I first got a .40 polymer gun, I'd only shot revolvers and those were, like you .357s. I had a learning curve to get to where I was holding the correct sight picture. It didn't "feel" right even though it looked right. I went on to shoot some USPSA and steels and eventually I got to where I could shoot a 10" target at 35 yds with a timer running. It took a while. I was most proud of cleaning a Texas Star at 15 yards without a miss. A Texas Star is a five pointed star with 6" steel plates at each point, when you shoot the first plate off, the imbalance starts the whole thing turning. I started shooting the .357 about 45 years ago, so I'm also in the "I need glasses to shoot" set.
     
  5. Owen Sparks

    Owen Sparks member

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    My Dad and I used to load each others revolvers for practice always leaving 1 to 3 empties in the cylinder. Then we would watdh each other like a hawk looking for signs of flenching. This method works well.
     
  6. 4v50 Gary

    4v50 Gary Moderator Staff Member

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    1) Ball 'n dummy.
    2) Place a coin on top of the gun.
    3) Put a sharpened pencil with a rubber eraser into the barrel and shoot at a cardboard target. The student will see for him/herself.
    4) Laser sight (good for instructor and student to watch the beam jump).
    5) Take archery. It takes more follow through and if the person can become a good archer, they can become a good handgunner.
     
  7. Blackstone

    Blackstone Member

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    To follow up on Point 5 in Gary's post, taking up air pistol would help as well, because it also takes more follow through because the pellet travels slower and remains in the barrel for longer.
     
  8. Owen Sparks

    Owen Sparks member

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    You are born with only two fears. The fear of falling and the fear of loud noise. Neither can be totally eliminated. The most seasoned professional shooter would flench just like anyone else if someone sliped up behind him and fired a shot unexpectedly. It is like blinking your eyes when something unexpectedly comes at your face. It requires a lot of training and concious effort not to flench at a loud noise even when you know it is comming. This is why Karate people yell when they punch and kick. The idea is to cause the opponant to tense up from the invoulentairy flench reflex.
     
  9. Cearbhall

    Cearbhall Member

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    One of my thoughts recently is, if you don't see the flash you may not be looking where you are shooting.
    ETA: That's at the pistol range.
     
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