Gun cleaning and fumes?

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by hobgob, Feb 17, 2009.

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  1. hobgob

    hobgob Member

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    My gun cleaning/work bench is in the back part of my basement and is not very well ventalated. So I was wondering what the side effects are to breathing the fumes from gun oil and cleaning solvent. What measures do you take to protect yourself? I already use disposable nitrile gloves, but would a mask or respirator be a good idea too?
     
  2. jcwit

    jcwit member

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    Boy this was interesting.

    What happened? Nows theres a 1st post.
     
    Last edited: Feb 17, 2009
  3. jmahalek

    jmahalek Member

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    I get a headache. I put a fan on my workbench to circulate the fumes away from my face, which has eliminated the problem. Can't speak to the effects on the human body, but the bottles say to use in a well-ventilated space.
     
  4. f4t9r

    f4t9r Member

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    open the nearest window and a fan
     
  5. hobgob

    hobgob Member

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    No windows in the basement. Dad wanted it to be tornado proof.
     
  6. indiandave

    indiandave Member

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    Have you tried a place in your house with a window? have you tried a porch?

    If you just clean your guns once a week or so I would think you would be alright in the basement.

    A paint supply place would have respirators If you are worried you could buy one and try it out.
     
  7. f4t9r

    f4t9r Member

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    You could always put a vent or small window in. A good concrete drill bit and a chisel will work. I have put vents in basements many times and had to remove block or concrete for windows. Not as bad as one would think.
    If its just a couple guns a fan should work.
     
  8. jcwit

    jcwit member

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    Wonder how mankind survived this long breathing all this stuff all these years.

    Remember we're living longer now than ever before.
     
  9. welldoya

    welldoya Member

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    I used to clean mine inside but found that I enjoy it a lot more if I do it outside on the bar on my deck. That Hoppe's # 9 can give you a headache.
     
  10. RugerBob

    RugerBob Member

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    Theres fumes? I hope they ain't flameable , cuz I am usually smokin a butt as I clean.
     
  11. jcwit

    jcwit member

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    Man O man. That Hoppe's #9 is like cologne. Almost as good as the smell of Rem Oil.
     
  12. glassman

    glassman Member

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    I don't mind the smell of hoppes but my wife hates it. I clean my guns on the back porch when the weather permits. Otherwise, I clean them in the kitchen when my wife isn't home and burn a candle for a while afterwards. If you have to stay in the basement, I guess a vent hood would be the best thing.
     
  13. jcwit

    jcwit member

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    Just another thought here. Is their a warning on the bottle, can, jar, whatever. Even qt. bottles of motor oil carry warnings.

    In reality you probably have more to worry about from the fat & oil dripping off the Big Mac.
     
  14. Jed Carter

    Jed Carter Member

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    If you cannot use these types of solvents in a well ventilated area, then use a respirator. Most indoor use of these chemicals is very dangerous to your health over the long term, read all labels and follow safety instructions, if you can smell it, it can hurt you. I do not use anything stronger than isopropyl alcohol, ever. It is strong enough to remove almost all deposits and powder residue. For the bore I use a mechanical type of cleaning solution, it scrubs away all fouling and no fumes to kill brain matter. Volatile organic compounds can kill you very quickly, or very slowly over time, much worse to your health than smoking. There is also another reason to use these types of chemicals in a well ventilated area... if you have pilot lites or even static discharge the fumes could ignite in a flash fire that is bad news for anyone around.
     
  15. Boba Fett

    Boba Fett Member

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    Wait, I thought breathing the fumes was part of the fun of cleaning your gun? :D
    Just kidding.

    Well, certainly the side effects are a concern, so I would read the warnings on the product and/or their website. If you can't find any warnings, call the company and ask.


    I wear the gloves like you do and I sometimes wear safety glasses if I'm spraying something I'm concerned about splashing back into my eyes.

    I used to do all my work outside or in the garage with the windows and doors of the garage open. But then I switched to Hoppe's Elite line of cleaner which is non-toxic and biodegradable.

    After that, no trips down the rabbit hole while cleaning the guns. And now I can do the cleaning pretty much anywhere and not worry about smelling or fuming the place up.

    For the few products I still use that do require some good airflow, I just step outside and do what I need to and come back in to the garage and have a fan running to keep any remaining fumes away from me.

    Hope that helps.
     
  16. Macmac

    Macmac Member

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    probably not fer much longer you ain't. :fire:

    Move the bench outside, or get some air in this tornado proof room. I take that to mean nearly air tight.

    The fumes are not the best for you, but won't kill you either. I used to be a foreign car mechanic and was in chems and fumes for years.

    I still am. Watch things like PB Blaster, Rem Oil, brake Kleen, carb cleaners, anything labled MEK, anything labled Carbon tet (dry cleaning fluid), Acetone, laquer thinner, others as bad...

    Wash after handing copper and copper dust. Don't eat or drink before washing your hands and face. If you eat and taste a odd flavor stop eatting and go wash up. (make copper, silver and brass jewelry)

    If you loads contain lead, go wash.. I bet this idea will come up in HR 45.
     
  17. Duke of Doubt

    Duke of Doubt member

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    I'll huff, and I'll puff, but I WON'T huff Hoppe's Number 9. What a wicked buzz.
     
  18. The Lone Haranguer

    The Lone Haranguer Member

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    Can you move to another room? This is not good. You can put down an area rug, plastic shields or other device to keep spills off the floor surface.
     
  19. RugerBob

    RugerBob Member

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    Macmac- all I ever use is rem oil or wd-40. I don't use nothing to strong cuz the gun cleanibg room is also the computer room and the wifes sewing-crafts room. A good compromise for me. And both oils w get the job done. Bob
     
  20. qajaq59

    qajaq59 Member

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    A lot of guys simply clean their guns before they leave the range. I do mine outside.
     
  21. Yosemite Sam

    Yosemite Sam Member

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    I always get a funky taste in my throat after I leave an indoor range. I must be inhaling and it can't be good over time...

    But back on topic, hobgob, I'd try to do it outside or at least somewhere ventilated. Cancer ain't all it's cracked up to be, and Murphy strikes the healthiest of people...
     
  22. hobgob

    hobgob Member

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    what sort of respirator would be proper for gun cleaning safety? I will clean my guns outside when i can, but weather does not always permit me to do so. just put a fan in the work area too, so conditions are improving.
     
    Last edited: Feb 20, 2009
  23. shootistpd27

    shootistpd27 Member

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    Any will do from walmart in the paint section.

    The fumes from paint and from gun cleaning solutions are similar in makeup and effects. I was once using a chemical adhesive in a bathroom I was remodeling and after about fifteen minutes I could barely walk. I got a simple respirator from walmart and no more problems. I would just buy a box fan and point it out the open door of the basement. It will pull out the bad fumes and force good air in.
     
  24. LAK

    LAK Member

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  25. ken2

    ken2 Member

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    lead

    Don't forget the chamber and barrel residue is also loaded with lead styphenate from the primers. I have a child at home, so I never clean my guns indoors and always change clothes after shooting. I'll relax a bit (or a lot) when the kids grow up, but for now, better safe than sorry.
     
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