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Gun etiquette question

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by Shemoves, Sep 24, 2007.

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  1. Shemoves

    Shemoves Member

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    I've been taught that when handed a gun, you always check to see if there is a round in the chamber. Makes sense. Question is, if you have seen the gun already get checked, do you still check it?

    Specific example: While at a gun store, a salesman pulls a gun off the rack for you. He checks it, then hands the gun to you. Do you also check it?

    Sorry if this is in the wrong forum, mod feel free to move.
     
  2. Jorg Nysgerrig

    Jorg Nysgerrig Member

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    I usually do, since working the action is usually something you want to do when you are inspecting the gun anyway.
     
  3. Shadow Shock

    Shadow Shock Member

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    Allways check it your self, even if it was just checked. Plus this will probobly make the gun store employee view you as a saftey oriented individual. Which never hurts.
     
  4. average_shooter

    average_shooter Member

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    The way I was taught; the person handing it checks it, shows you it is clear then hands it to you. When you take it you check it and verify that it is cleared. Check often while handling the firearm.

    At gun stores, when checking out a potential future purchase, I do most of the handling with the slide locked back.
     
  5. jlbraun

    jlbraun Member

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    Absolutely.

    It also separates you from the yahoos in the eyes of the gun store employee.
     
  6. Shemoves

    Shemoves Member

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    All great info, will do. Thanks.
     
  7. GigaBuist

    GigaBuist Member

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    Always check. A couple years ago I was in my apartment with 4 other gun buddies. As pistols were passed about everybody checked them at least once each.
     
  8. SuperNaut

    SuperNaut Member

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    Gun store scenario aside; because the first person may not be checking for clear.
     
  9. pax

    pax Member

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    Yep. Check it yourself.

    When you hand it back, hand it back with the action open, so the other person can easily check for himself, too.

    pax
     
  10. Justin

    Justin Moderator Emeritus

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    I always do, even if the person handing it to me just showed me an empty chamber.

    By doing it every time I'm handed a gun, it reinforces the action, hopefully to the point where it simply becomes reflexive.
     
  11. MrPeter

    MrPeter Member

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    If someone hands me a gun I always always always check the action, I don't care if the action is open or it was just checked. This includes when I pick up my gun out of its kydex (I store them in their holsters, takes less space).

    I also never put my finger in the trigger guard, unless I'm going to dry fire, and if I want to try the trigger, I always ask if I may dry fire this particular gun, if it doesn't belong to me. Some people are very particular.
     
  12. joab

    joab Member

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    Whenever I hand someone, especially someone I am not sure of, a gun I check it and close the action and hand it to them

    I want to see of they will also check , if not I am I assume that this is a person unfamiliar with firearms
     
  13. CountGlockula

    CountGlockula Member

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    There's nothing wrong to double-triple-quadruple-sextuple-sentuple...etc. checking.

    You might get OCD. Disclaimer: Apologies to those that may have OCD.
    :neener:
     
  14. Mainsail

    Mainsail Member

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    I always lock it open and take a gander down the bullet hole.
     
  15. Floppy_D

    Floppy_D Member In Memoriam

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    If you don't check, just make sure you post in the negligent discharge thread when things go south. :D
     
  16. XavierBreath

    XavierBreath Member

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    I always check a closed weapon that is handed to me. I always hand it back with an open chamber and a stern look in the other man's eye.

    Proper etiquette would require the salesman to hand you a pistol with the slide locked back, chamber open, for inspection. A revolver would be handed to you with the cylinder swung open for inspection. A rifle would have the bolt locked back. Since he handed you a closed chamber, it was he who violated proper etiquette, not you. Thus your checking the closed chamber handed to you should not raise protest. Make sure you hand the weapon back with the chamber open.

    Among experienced gun handlers and salesmen, this is how they instantly know if they are dealing with another experienced handler or a novice. Checking that closed chamber sends a subtle message that you know what you are doing. Handing it back chamber open tells the other person you damned sure know what you are doing.

    This etiquette comes from the military. An inspecting officer is always handed a rifle or sidearm with an open chamber that has been checked by the bearer in the officer's presence. This occurs with formal inspections and changing of guards. It is courtesy. Note too, that when the officer hands the weapon back, the chamber is open, whether he has manipulated the action or not.The bearer then again checks the chamber before placing the weapon at rest.

    As Mr. Peter stated, keep your booger hook off the bang switch too.
     
  17. El Tejon

    El Tejon Member

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    The Four Rules light is always on.
     
  18. DoubleTapDrew

    DoubleTapDrew Member

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    I just take their word for it and dry fire at my temple a couple times before checking myself. :neener:

    If someone gets offended at you checking for clear after they just did, keep an eye on that person. Personally I'm relieved when someone checks for clear when I hand them a weapon (even though I just did). Shows they know what the heck they are doing and care about safety.
     
  19. skeeter1

    skeeter1 Member

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    I had one gunshop owner get really mad at me for checking a gun myself. That's what I was taught to do, and I'll always do it. I never went back to that gunshop, and it has long since gone out of business. I don't miss them.
     
  20. theCZ

    theCZ Member

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    All the stores I frequent hand me a pistol with the slide locked back (sorry, I haven't shopped for any wheel guns). I still peep down the chamber. Bolt guns I keep the bolt open, unless I'm pointing in a safe direction to check bolt cycling (empty of course).
     
  21. littlegator

    littlegator Member

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    I'm kinda a hypochondriac when it comes to checking it anyway, so nobody should be surprised that I check even after they do. Besides, I like to feel the resistance of the slide and the feel of the gun. It's just natural...
     
  22. U.S.SFC_RET

    U.S.SFC_RET Member

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    Not only do I visually check the chamber each and every time I stick my pinky finger to feel the chanber to feel thet there is an empty chamber. Your Eyes will play tricks on you. Your mind will tell you what you want to see even if there is a round in the chamber. Trust me on this one.
    I post those four rules in my signature line for a reason. Ask my brother in law and ask my uncle. They are not around any longer, unloaded guns kill.
     
  23. 230RN
    • Contributing Member

    230RN Marines raising the left-leaning Pisa tower.

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    I've had to ask them to open the action when they tried to hand it to me. I will not accept a gun with a closed action.

    I visually and, if possible, manually, check the chamber. I also make sure I can see daylight through the mag well.

    These are almost absolute rules --the exceptions are that with some arms you can't lock back the slide or bolt (eg, old 10-22s) or stick your finger in the receiver to feel for a round (again, some .22s).

    One thing I've noticed with the popularity of steel-cased ammo is that the laquered cases can be hard to see in dim lighting because of their dark color.

    For one used to seeing nice, bright brass, the newer steel cases can easily fool me if my glasses are a little dirty or I'm particularly stupid that particular day.

    Because of this, I've gotten really persnickety about looking in the chambers and groping in there with a pinky.

    Bear in mind that simply cycling the action is no guarantee that there is no cartridge in the chamber! Extractors break, slip, extractor springs break or wear out, etc. etc.

    Because of this fact, I had my first negligent discharge several decades ago with a 1911 whose extractor had broken. I cycled the action a couple of times, but a round was left in the chamber anyhow. I've mentioned this before, but I guess it's worth saying again, that the gun functioned normally since the residual gases blew out the empty cases and the ejector kicked them out just like normal. The negligent discharge was, however, in a safe direction.

    I found the broken extractor hook on my workbench the next day, which is how I know the gun was functioning normally without an extractor hook.
     
  24. ShooterMcGavin

    ShooterMcGavin Member

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    Absolutely, always check. Even if I just saw him show me the empty chamber, I check again once it is in my hands. It is too risky to get complacent with the thought that "he just checked, and he knows what he's doing".

    If I am handing someone MY gun to inspect, I clear the gun but I do not hand them my gun with the slide locked back. I am too worried that a careless person will drop the slide lock and SLAM the slide closed on an empty chamber. You can call me inexperienced or say that I lack etiquette, but I may be saving my defensive gun from being abused.

    If I am handing someone's gun back to them, or back to the salesman at a gun shop, then I do hand it back with the slide locked back.

    Another, related question: I prefer to hand a gun to someone with the muzzle pointed downwards or in a safe direction to the side. When someone hands you a gun butt-first (pointed directly at themselves), should you just grab the gun with a shooting grip? Is that a little uncomfortable for some of you, as it is for me?
    Of course your finger should be off the trigger.
     
  25. shooter429

    shooter429 Member

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    Yes, ALWAYS check it yourself!

    I saw a perfect and frightening example of how important this is at a store just a few days ago. The place has an indoor range as well as a pro shop with rentals. The store policy prohibits loaded weapons in the store section. A customer comes in off the range to turn in a rental gun. The customer laid the weapon on the counter and asked to see another. The store clerk asked if the gun was unloaded, and the customer said "yes, of course." The shop clerk picked up the gun, pulled back the slide, and we all got to watch a live round was ejected from the gun and flew across the counter. Needless to say, I was a little shocked. I asked the clerk if that was very common and he stated that it actually was. :uhoh:

    What if the clerk had not personally checked it or another customer picked it up without checking it himself? :eek:

    Great question.

    Be safe.

    Shooter429
     
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