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Help with bent K Frame ejector rod.

Discussion in 'Handguns: Revolvers' started by 20nickels, Jul 23, 2008.

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  1. 20nickels

    20nickels Member

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    S&W 617 ejector rod got severly bent out of shape while out of it's frame. Completely my fault, It was traveling in an overpadded box. :banghead: Can the average kitchen table gunsmith replace it easy enough with a new one from Brownell's? Or is this experienced gunsmith territory?
     
  2. csmkersh

    csmkersh Member

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    Replacement is no big deal. It just screws into the cylinder. Right now I don't remember if it's left handed or right handed threads. Since it's already damage, I'd put a set of vise grips on it and then turn the cylinder, not the rod.


     
  3. machinisttx

    machinisttx Member

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    What's the dash number? I'll look it up and see if it's left or right hand threads. You might also want to get a yoke/crane alignment tool and make sure the yoke is straight in the frame. If the cylinder and yoke were assembled when the damage occured, it's entirely possible that the yoke is now warped as well.
     
  4. 20nickels

    20nickels Member

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    Tks, Csm. I always like to double check thses sorts of things. I'm very angry with myself as this was such a straight shooter.

    Machinisttx,
    I'll get that that dash # for you and I am also afraid of the yoke also being warped. Do you have a link to the tool so I know I'm getting the right thing?
     
  5. mainmech48

    mainmech48 Member

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    Brownell's is where I usually look first for special tools and fixtures.

    FWIW, it's been my experience that it's almost always cheaper to pay a pro to do a job that requires special tools or fixtures to do it than it is to buy them for a one-shot fix.

    They're likely to have them already, know what it takes to use them to best advantage, be able to handle any curve balls that might crop up in the job and charge less than the cost of the part(s) and the tools for the work.
     
  6. KINGMAX

    KINGMAX Member

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    PRO work

    Either send it back to S&W, or pay a good gunsmith. Your best deal may be a good local gunsmith.
     
  7. machinisttx

    machinisttx Member

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    LINK You want the #2 tool

    If you intend to work on your own S&W's, it would be a good idea to pick up a copy of Jerry Kuhnhausen's S&W shop manual. Link to manual
     
  8. dwf6666

    dwf6666 Member

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    It really depends on how badly it is bent. These bend fairly easily and can be straightened. I set them up in my mill and use a dial indicator to locate and straighten them. If it is badly bent, then the centerpin is bent too. It's really not a hard fix unless it's broken. BTW these have been left hand threads since about 1961. Good luck
     
  9. riverdog

    riverdog Member

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    I've received very good work and turn-around times from S&W. Give them a call at 1-800-331-0852 and see what they think.
     
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