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Henry Rifles: is it true?

Discussion in 'Rifle Country' started by Shane S., Jul 1, 2010.

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  1. Shane S.

    Shane S. Member

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    So, I received a Henry rifle magazine in the mail today, and I noticed in the bottom left corner -Est.1862-2010- that is a lie. The original Henry rifle company was founded back the by Tyler Henry, but they are not the same, Tyler Henry became part of Winchester. The modern day Henry company started making Henry's in 1991. Correct me if Im wrong but Wikipedia says the have no relation.

    And is it true that the receiver cover is just painted??
    That doesn't sound like quality to me!
     
  2. FIVETWOSEVEN

    FIVETWOSEVEN Member

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    Springfield Armory does that. The new company was founded in 1971 as I recall.
     
  3. CraigC
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    CraigC Member

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    The current Henry Repeating Arms Co. is in no way related to Benjamin Tyler Henry. They are simply cashing in on the famous name because it has no copyright protection and building a couple of similar "looking" (only to the uninitiated) rifles.

    Their rimfire rifles do indeed have a zinc based alloy frame (i.e. pot metal) with a painted cover. The Golden Boy is similar with a brass plating. They are decent guns for the money but a far cry from the all steel Winchester 94/22 and Marlin 39.
     
  4. ccsniper

    ccsniper member

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    wow, I am glad I saw this.
     
  5. CraigC
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    CraigC Member

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    PS, to use the name is misleading but to print "est. 1862-2010" on their packaging is an outright lie.
     
  6. jimmyraythomason

    jimmyraythomason Member

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    How many nits can be picked out of this one?
     
  7. JNewell

    JNewell Member

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    Going on memory here, but I'm pretty sure there never was a Henry Rifle Company. The corporate progression was, IIRC:

    Volcanic Arms Co., which more or less fathered:

    New Haven Arms Co. (OF Winchester) and the S&W company (Messrs. Smith and Wesson), and then:

    New Haven Arms Co. became Winchester Repeating Arms Co.

    Honoring BT Henry is a good touch but it is not historical, AFAIK.

     
  8. BigWoolyBanjo

    BigWoolyBanjo Member

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    "but Wikipedia says..."

    Now there's a good source for solid information...
     
  9. rcmodel

    rcmodel Member in memoriam

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    Well, it was in this case.

    It's true.

    The presnt day Henry Arms never had anything in the slightest to do with B. Tyler Henry's rifles, designs, patents, or any company that made & sold them.

    rc
     
  10. MCMXI

    MCMXI Member

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    Perhaps Chuck Hawks obtained his information from Wikipedia too! :rolleyes:

    http://www.chuckhawks.com/henry_goldenboy_rifles.htm

    Their website and brochure are blatantly misleading but rather than address that directly why not blame Wikipedia or Benjamin Tyler Henry himself.

    "Today, the Henry Repeating Arms Company, a descendant of the venerable gunmaker, makes its home in Bayonne, New Jersey."

    http://www.henryrepeating.com/aboutus.cfm

    What a crock ... but who cares ... I've never liked their rifles anyway. Despite desperately wanting a lever action in .454 Casull, even if the mob does offer one, I ain't gonna buy one ... they can FORGED ABOUD ID!!

    :)
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 2, 2010
  11. R.W.Dale

    R.W.Dale Member

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    Yes because chuck Hawk's nose is absolutely clean when it comes to being as fastidious as possible to checking and only publishing the absolute FACTS

    Amongst firearms enthusiasts "Chuck Hawks said" is if anything worse than "Wikipedia said"
     
  12. JNewell

    JNewell Member

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    Right - Wikipedia is right, ChuckHawks is right. There is no connection at all, other than five random letters of the English alphabet that we recognize as a surname.
     
  13. ArmedBear

    ArmedBear Member

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    To be fair, the present day Remington Arms Company never had anything in the slightest to do with what they sold before and during WW II, either, and Browning Arms Company was founded in 1927 -- JMB died in 1926.

    It's best to judge a gun on its merits, not the name stamped on it. I'm a Model 39 guy, myself, but Henry's company name is not why.
     
  14. MCMXI

    MCMXI Member

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    So are you saying that the current Henry Rifle Company is a descendent of Benjamin Tyler Henry using the Merriam-Webster definition as shown below?

    Main Entry: 1de·scen·dant
    Variant(s): also de·scen·dent \di-ˈsen-dənt\
    Function: adjective
    Etymology: Middle English dessendaunte, from Anglo-French descendant, from Latin descendent-, descendens, present participle of descendere
    Date: circa 1555

    1 : moving or directed downward
    2 : proceeding from an ancestor or source

    :)
     
  15. swilli41

    swilli41 Member

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    Henry Rifles

    Perhaps Henry Arms should be named ERMA West. I believe Henry bought the tooling for their .22 lever action and .22 pump from the now defunct Erma in Germany. The two brands appear to be identical.
     
  16. ArmedBear

    ArmedBear Member

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    Didn't Ithaca source lever guns from Erma, back when they also imported SKB shotguns?

    Those shotguns are great, but not because they say "Ithaca" on them. The ones that say "SKB", "Weatherby", or "Orvis" are good, too.
     
  17. MCMXI

    MCMXI Member

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    If you bother to read the Wikipedia article on the Herny rifle, you'll notice that a reference is sited. You'd better add American Rifleman to the Wikipedia/Chuck Hawks list of unreliable sources!!

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_rifle#cite_ref-American_Rifleman_2-1

    "In 1973, Louis Imperato bought the firearms company of Iver Johnson and began making commercial versions of the M1 carbine. In 1993, Imperato started a factory in his native Brooklyn to manufacture .22 caliber rifles under the newly recreated name[3] of the Henry Repeating Arms Co. which are currently manufactured in Brooklyn, New York. The current company, not to be confused with the original Henry rifles,[3] does not produce the Civil War period firearm that this article defines. It produces lever action rifles that are more akin to later Marlin types."

    [3] American Rifleman, May 2008; (Henry Repeating Arms) founder, p. 26.

    Here's some information on Iver Johnson (from Wikipedia :rolleyes:)

    "Iver Johnson died in 1895, and his sons took over the business. Frederick (born 10/2/1871), John (born 6/26/1876), and Walter (birthdate unknown), had vastly different levels of involvement in the company ranging from executive leadership to barely any involvement at all. They shepherded the company through a phase of expansion, as bicycle operations grew, then converted to motorcycle manufacturing and sales. They also saw the growth of the firearms business and the eventual restructuring of the company to focus on firearms and related business as they divested non-firearms concerns, such as the motorcycle business, in the face of growing firearms demand, World War I's armaments industry expansion, and other factors. As family ownership waned and outside investment via publicly traded stock and mergers/acquisitions/partnerships took hold, the company changed ownership and moved several times during its operation. The company eventually dropped "Cycle Works" from its moniker when that part of the business was shut down. The business successfully weathered the Great Depression (in part thanks to higher rates of armed robbery crimes, which helped maintain demand for personal firearms) and was buoyed by the dramatic increase in the market for arms leading up to and during World War II. As a result of changes in ownership, the company had the first of two major relocations in 1971 when it moved to New Jersey. It moved again to Jacksonville, Arkansas, and was jointly owned by Lynn Lloyd and Lou Imperato, who also owned the Henry brand name, before it finally ceased trading under its own name in 1993, at which time it was owned by American Military Arms Corp (AMAC)."

    :)
     
  18. MCMXI

    MCMXI Member

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    This is a very different situation with a CLEAR pedigree that goes all the way back to Eliphalet Remington. The Remington plant in Ilion, NY is on the same site that was established in 1828 by Eliphalet Remington.

    Henry Rifle Company's website reminds me of the myriad of Chinese companies making crappy $10 watches under old Swiss watch company names. They set up official looking websites with a history about the original company that is accurate. What they don't tell you, is that the original Swiss watch company went out of business more than 50 years ago and the name was sold to a Chinese company who now makes $10 watches but sells them on Ebay or similar places for $200. Suckers who search for information on those watches find websites showing MSRPs of $2,000 and can't believe that they're getting such a great deal.

    Integrity is everything ... without it you have nothing!!

    :)
     
    Last edited: Jul 1, 2010
  19. Boba Fett

    Boba Fett Member

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    I checked Henry's site and found the following under their History page:

    Also, their manual has a Introduction page which says:
    http://www.henryrepeating.com/pdf/henry_bigboy.pdf

    Perhaps someone should email them and ask if they are really a descendant of the original company since they are claiming to be.
     
  20. ArmedBear

    ArmedBear Member

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    That doesn't equal "integrity."

    I prefer to buy rifles that I judge to be good rifles.
     
  21. MCMXI

    MCMXI Member

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    If you have to lie or mislead the public about your history then something is very wrong. Politicians do this all the time and we hold them accountable.

    I guess the Marlin 1894CSS didn't make your list then.

    :)
     
  22. HPJeep

    HPJeep Member

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    As Joseph Goebbels said "tell a lie often enough people will start to believe it." Eventually people will fall for Henrys marketing ploy.
     
  23. ArmedBear

    ArmedBear Member

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    Marlin's 1894 is a "lie", too, in case you didn't know that. It's a more modern gun than its namesake. Marlin is, itself, a bit of a lie. It went out of business, and was bought for essentially nothing by the Kenna family, who re-started the company.

    I have an 1894C. I'll probably get more 1894s. The "lie" hasn't had any impact on its function, or my satisfaction with it.

    I own no Henry products, but again, I have other reasons for that. And I do agree with you that, if you have to lie, something is probably wrong.

    But... Things you'll find in Remington's copy have sometimes made me cringe. Foremost among them: the 870 wasn't the "ball-bearing pump". That was the Model 31, its higher-end predecessor that's arguably even nicer than a Model 12, and unquestionably smoother than any 870. The 870 was called "tin-can pump" by fans of the 31, who were disgusted when the 870 replaced their beloved "ball-bearing" guns in the Remington lineup.

    I have an 870, too; I just don't harbor delusions about what it is.:)
     
    Last edited: Jul 1, 2010
  24. Lovesbeer99

    Lovesbeer99 Member

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    Did the new compy buy rights of some kind? If they did that would entitle them to the firms history I believe. I'm not saying they did, I'm just asking.

    Also, when did Henry move to Bayonne? I thought they were in Brooklyn.
     
  25. NWCP

    NWCP Member

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    I was watching a youngster at the gun range a few weeks back shooting his birthday present. It was a Henry .22LR. He looked to be having the time of his life and I'm sure wouldn't have cared less about the pedigree of his rifle. I wouldn't own one, but then I'm not an 11 year old shooting his first rifle. Both he and his father had a good time at the range so the 'cheap' Henry is serving its purpose. Will it last a lifetime like our Winchesters, or Marlins? Maybe, maybe not, but it has made one young kid a shooting enthusiast and that counts for something. Could be it's all dad could afford at the time. Whatever the case it made a memorable day for one father and son. That's pretty cool in my book.
     
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