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How do you catalog your loads?

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by JRWhit, Feb 5, 2013.

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  1. JRWhit

    JRWhit Member

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    When I started into loading I just kept track of my loads by a sticker on the case or a small card provided by the bullet manufacturer. I soon found that to be deficient and moved to a notebook binder to list progress and current loads in use,along with number of brass uses, brass length,OAL exe exe.
    Just curious and hopeful to learn or copy, how does everyone catalog there loads?
     
  2. RandyP

    RandyP Member

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    No catalog, I just use a self-created load label on each box of my reloads. When I need more I just follow the data listed on the box.

    I try to make reloading as choreless as possible - lol

    My caveat, I am only reloading for 4 pistol calibers, ALL using the same powder Win 231/HP-38. It's what I started reloading using and I have not found a reason to change. But honestly I'd stick with the self-adhesive labels regardless of the number of calibers or powders.
     
  3. rfwobbly

    rfwobbly Member

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    I started with a notebook, one page per bullet. That worked great when there were only 2 calibers. Now I wish I had put pistol in a separate notebook from rifle.

    Now I'm considering one large Excel workbook, with a tab for each caliber. Easier to sort. Better for house keeping. More of a pain to enter.
     
  4. leadchucker

    leadchucker Member

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    I keep reloading logs in three ring binders. I record all pertinent information about any load I work up. I also record the details of every batch of ammo I load, both in the log, and on an Avery sticker that goes on the box or boxes of ammo themselves.

    It's fairly easy to create printable forms for all the data entries, using Word or Excel.
     
  5. tbob38

    tbob38 Member

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    For years, I used index cards and a box for them. Now I have started a load log book, we'll see if that's any better.
     
  6. jr_roosa

    jr_roosa Member

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    Excel spreadsheet.

    Includes load data, chrony data, and cost data.

    Separate sheet has match result data and shooting dope.

    Used to have a notebook but then it's too hard to go back and look things up.

    J.
     
  7. Andrew Leigh

    Andrew Leigh Member

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    Spreadsheet, wanna copy?
     
  8. ReloaderFred

    ReloaderFred Member

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    Having lost several computers over the years, I'm very reluctant to rely on one for keeping records, even with back up technology. I remember 8 track tapes, Bournuli disks, etc.....

    I keep my logs in 3 ring binders, one for rifle and one for handgun, and I'm about to start a second handgun binder. Lyman makes an excellent record page, but it's only one sided, so I copy it and make my pages two sided.

    I also make labels for each box of ammunition (Berry's Plastic 100 round boxes), so I can simply look at my shelves of ammunition and see what lot it came from, the load, date, etc., at a glance. I don't keep track of the number of times a piece of brass has been loaded, but do a thorough inspection prior to loading each piece of brass. Avery #18167 return address labels work great for this.

    I now load 30 different calibers, from .380 acp to .45-120 Sharps, so there's no way I could keep track of the thousands of rounds of different ammunition I have without keeping good records on paper. Once Walkalong asked me how many rounds of .38 Special I had loaded that year, so I went back through my records for that caliber and was able to give him the exact amount, which was somewhere around 10,000+ rounds for the year in that one caliber, if I remember correctly.

    My method works for me, but everyone has to come up with the method that works best for them. One size doesn't fit all.

    Hope this helps.

    Fred
     
  9. FROGO207

    FROGO207 Member

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    I have several 3 ring binders for the loads and development that I can update. One for .22 to .260 one for .270 to .30 and one for above that in rifles. Similar sets for handgun/shotgun. I keep track of what worked and what did not and what it worked in. I reload for 38 calibers presently as well as shotgun data so it would be really confusing otherwise. Also after all these years I find myself looking before I try a different combo and see that I already tried that and save myself time and money in the long run. Note that this method works without need for electrical power if need be.;) As far as what I do with the ammo I list the particulars on recycled paper (cut up envelopes) and insert it into the box/freezer bag for positive ID as well as a reminder of what I need to reload in the future to replace what was used. Low tech and easy that's what I like.
     
  10. Walkalong

    Walkalong Moderator

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    Home made Excel log. I save any change to three other drives and two memory sticks, every time. I occasionally save it to another drive stored by its self and not hooked to anything.
     
  11. Kingcreek

    Kingcreek Member

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    Not real pretty but my three reloading manuals are chuck full of pieces of paper and targets and groups with my notes scribbled all over them and inserted as book marks under appropriate caliber. Totally unaffected by my last computer crash. Low tech and not elegant but it has worked for me for 30 years.
     
  12. jrdavidson

    jrdavidson Member

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    Software engineer by day, reloading junkie by night

    So I admit it, I'm a geek.

    I use a version of Filemaker database for the Mac called Bento. Its basically Excel on steroids, except it has customizable entry and report forms.

    I log all my reloading sessions with the usual fields: date, caliber, headstamp, bullet profile, bullet weight, powder, powder amount, oal, etc.

    I can answer all sorts of questions regarding my reloading history and inventory of live rounds. I also maintain an inventory of all reloading components to alert me when I'm running low. I scan test targets and load them through a group size analysis tool and enter the image and group sizes into my database to objectively compare test loads by group size and spread (a chrony is on my wish list).

    I use this online group analysis tool: http://blog.robballen.com/apps/SGA/

    My reloading log database syncs to my phone so I can review the log at the range too, if need be.

    I tried a paper log, but always forgot to update it. Now I update on my phone while cleaning up after a session and it automatically syncs to my desktop and stays updated everywhere.

    Am I obsessive? To quote the Bud NFL commercial: Its only weird if it doesn't work...:)
     
  13. RainDodger

    RainDodger Member

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    Excel.

    ... but the other day I was perusing my OLD reloading manuals (Sierra) from the 1970s. They had a section of blank pages (ring binders) to record your loads. It was a barrel of fun reading my comments from back then and looking at the loads.

    Theres something to be said for handwritten records! :)
     
  14. thomis

    thomis Member

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    This forum won't allow you to attach an excel sheet so here are some pics of the one i put together.. All I have to write on the target is the "Load ID". The third tab on the spreadsheet is data from a ballistics calculator, so then I know how much holdover for the given load, or thereabouts...




    Untitled1_zpsb932f59f.jpg

    Untitled2_zps842dfbf5.jpg

    Untitled3_zps6033b850.jpg

    Untitled4_zps6d0a09a8.jpg
     
  15. James2

    James2 Member

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    Labels on the loaded ammo boxes or bags. I feel this is very important so loads can be identified. Labels contain date, primer, powder and bullet.

    Notes in the loading manual.

    3 ring binder for additional data and notes.
     
  16. ATLDave

    ATLDave Member

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    I just started reloading last year, and I figured the more data I logged, the faster I might learn things. And logging the data keep the process slow and careful. So I keep a reloading log. Each loading session gets a new page. Powder, primer, brass type, primer type, bullet weight and brand and type, are all listed at the top. I also list the powder thrower settings, if I'm throwing the charges. Each finished round gets weighed and OAL measured; those numbers get recorded for each round. If I'm throwing charges but tare-weighing them in the case, then those get recorded as well.

    The completed rounds go in cases, and a post-it note, folded in half, follows that records the caliber, bullet weight, and powder charge. If a box contains a bunch of max loads or something close, I'll note that, too.
     
  17. ArchAngelCD

    ArchAngelCD Member

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    I use cards in the boxes so I know what I'm shooting. I catalog the loads in a note book so I always have access to them when loading and I also put all the loads I try, along with range notes into a spreadsheet for access when at the computer. Range notes are also included in the note book.
     
  18. Walkalong

    Walkalong Moderator

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    Here is my simple one. I have three or four variations, depending on what I am trying to do with the load.
     

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  19. Walkalong

    Walkalong Moderator

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    Here is another one. I'll get a pic of .308 later. Much more info logged there.
     

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  20. Arkansas Paul

    Arkansas Paul Member

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    No cataloging here. I do label each box, and or ammo can with bullet type, weight and powder charge.
     
  21. Clark

    Clark Member

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    I label each plastic box with post-it and Scotch tape over the post-it.

    I write up a range report and staple the targets to the report.

    I started reloading 14 years ago by using a spread sheet to record results.
    I was trying to over load every 9mm bullet and powder combination.
    No more spread sheets.

    I have had contracts where I am to supply source data. I have hired people to collect data for aerospace and medical equipment development.
    What we would not want, is some abstract representation in a spread sheet. What we want is observational data like would be entered into a lab book.

    The way that Ackley described overloading military rifles in 1962 is a model of how to describe the independent variables [situation] and the dependent variables [results] in working up loads.
     
  22. Reefinmike

    Reefinmike Member

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    Once I find something I like, I stick with it. for pistol, they all get tula primers and hp38 powder. 380 gets 2.9gr powder and a 100gr bullet, 38 gets 3.4gr powder and a 158gr bullet, 357 gets 7.0gr powder and a 125gr plated bullet and 45acp get 4.9gr powder and a 230 grain bullet. I cast em all except the 357 bullets so they all get the same bullet type, profile and alloy. different turrets have dies set and they are not moved so readjusting and different seating depths arent a thing. periodically I will check oal to ensure they are all seated the same.

    as for labeling- since I know they are all the same, I simply box em all up and slap a little sticker with the date on one of the rounds in the box and pack em away in a 50 cal can. 800 38/357's to a can, 1,000 45's to a can and 1,200 380's to a can. I shoot the oldest ones first to keep them "fresh"
     
  23. jjjitters

    jjjitters Member

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    When I got a new laptop I went through and made up a spreadsheet for all my bullets and powders, attached photos of my targets, spent hour and hours getting everything real nice. Month four the hardrive faulted, lost everything, said p**s on it and just use the labels and scribbled down some of my best recipes in a notebook I had . They are laying around somewhere.:banghead:
     
  24. Cherokee

    Cherokee Member

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    I started with a note book back in late 50's, then went to index cards, then to a Tandy 1000 PC. I entered all the manual data at that point into a word processor file and used that for several years. Then I converted everything to Microsoft Word documents and have stayed there because I did not want to convert all those files into a database. I use Excel for a lot of reloading stuff but not the load records. Here is the basic Word document wherein I keep load data, batch data, chron, and shooting results for each rifle or handgun load. I print the Word records and file in binders by cartridge. I also back up everything on my PC's every few months. I also use a removable Avery label to identify each box of ammo with brief load data.

    ReloadRecord.jpg
     
  25. MEHavey

    MEHavey Member

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    1 Gun/1 Notebook each

    Then a simple WORD document that I enter the load data into, cut out into a strip with a pair of scissors, that then goes in the ammo box behind that loading.

    At the range the strip gets pulled out and scotch-taped into the Notebook along with the results:

    w7dieo.jpg

    BTW: That "WORD" document just gets longer and longer as I add load data into it -- all different cartridges in serial sequence. I can then look things up (a) in the book; or (b) in scrolling down and/or "search" in the document
     
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