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how do you revive an old leather holster??

Discussion in 'Handguns: Holsters and Accessories' started by w103tws, Oct 2, 2010.

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  1. w103tws

    w103tws Member

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    So I found an old leather holster for my 1911, but it is very dry. The gun fits perfect, but sounds like rubbing against cardboard when putting it in. It is very rough on the inside. The belt loops and every part of the holster are just very dry and almost brittle, but not cracked. I was just wondering what to use on this to bring it back to life. Cooking oil? Carnuba Wax? 3 in 1 oil? Any suggestions are appreciated. Thanks
     
  2. Sanjuro82

    Sanjuro82 Member

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    Ballistol has worked great for me. I use it for cleaning and lubing my firearms so I always have it on hand. All you have to do is hand rub the Ballistol into the leather. It really revives old or dry leather.
     
  3. paradox998

    paradox998 Member

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    Look for Connolly Hide Care. It is a cream high in lanolin and used to help re-hydrate old leather.
     
  4. commygun

    commygun Member

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    Hubbards Shoe Grease generously applied and then placed in a warm area so it can soak in Some may be horrified by this suggestion but it's always worked for me. If the colors fading on the holster generously apply the appropiate Kiwi Shoe polish to it before applying the grease.
     
  5. ZeroJunk

    ZeroJunk Member

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    Neatsfoot Oil had been around forever and probably works about as well as anything.
     
  6. FatPants

    FatPants Member

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    Is get some of the stuff used for breaking in baseball gloves. Usually only a couple bucks at the store.
     
  7. Red Cent

    Red Cent Member

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    Better ask the significant other before you use Ballistol:evil:.
     
  8. oldbanjo

    oldbanjo Member

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    Too much neatsfoot ail may make it too soft.
     
  9. w103tws

    w103tws Member

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    has anyone ever heard of using carnuba? I came across that on the net, but not sure about it.
     
  10. 788Ham

    788Ham Member

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    Get a can of saddle soap, the pioneers can't be wrong! Neetsfoot might make it too soft.
     
  11. Shimitup

    Shimitup Member

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    If nothing else I like the smell of Hubberds Shoe Grease, neatsfoot oil too for that matter. Neatsfoot oil should be ok as long as you don't soak it. Just dampen a rag enough to get a moderate color change in the leather and wait for the result for a couple of days then if needed apply a little more. If you want a more waxy product, I think its called Nikwax, can be had from places that sell hiking and backpacking gear.
     
  12. Guillermo

    Guillermo member

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    you can say that again...

    (I guess I just did)
     
  13. Mr.510

    Mr.510 Member

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    Depending on how the leather was tanned I would use the appropriate product from Pecard (www.pecard.com). I found them when searching for a way to revive and protect an antique leather saddle that was dry and crunchy. Their products are highly recommended by museum curators and others that deal with long-term preservation of leather. Many products commonly used as leather conditioners (like saddle soap) cause more harm to the leather than good. I use Pecard Antique Leather Dressing on pretty much everything from boots to holsters to the leather seat on my motorcycle. Other Pecard formulas may last longer on some types of leather but there is no chance of damaging any type of leather with this particular product.
     
  14. Coal Dragger

    Coal Dragger Member

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    I use a lot of Obenauf's heavy duty leather preservative. It has worked really well for me on everything from work boots, to rifle slings.
     
  15. Smith357

    Smith357 Member

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    I have dipped an old holsters and some old knife sheaths in bee's wax before, It seems to work ok.
     
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