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how do you store ammo?

Discussion in 'Shooting Gear and Storage' started by ohihunter2014, Feb 1, 2017.

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  1. .308 Norma

    .308 Norma Member

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    I guess I don't understand your question ohihunter. Each of the MTM plastic ammo boxes you found holds 50 or 100 rounds of 9mm, right? If so, those are the types of ammo boxes full of ammo I store inside military ammo cans. I don't just store loose rounds of ammunition in military ammo cans, and I'd be surprised to learn if many people do.
    But yes, my military ammo cans are made out of steel. As far as I can tell, those "Cabela's mil spec ammo cans" are too. That doesn't mean I wouldn't buy them though if I didn't already have enough old military ammo cans on hand.
    By the way, if those MTM plastic ammo boxes you found at 10 for $35.00 are what I think they are, that's a decent buy.
     
  2. ohihunter2014

    ohihunter2014 Member

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    this is a large MTM ammo crate/box that comes with 10 individual 100rd boxes to store inside the larger box.

    http://www.cabelas.com/product/shoo...n-boxes/_/N-1112592/Ns-CATEGORY_SEQ_522363780
     
    Growlers and .308 Norma like this.
  3. .308 Norma

    .308 Norma Member

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    Nice! Thanks ohihunter! Yeah, I'd never seen the type of MTM ammo box you're talking about before. Other than the fact they don't make they don't make them for some of the cartridges I handload, they look like they would work just as well as my method(s) of storing extra ammo. And to answer your question - military ammo cans are readily available and relatively cheap, but I personally don't see any "great" advantages to them. To me, being "made out of steel" only means that I had to dig through a stack of about a hundred steel cans in a surplus store just to find a half dozen that were rust free.
     
  4. InfoLoader

    InfoLoader Member

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    Hi, air,moisture,and temperature swings which causes condensation almost like how a cold soda can sweats on a hot day are the main factors to storing for long term. Plastic ammo cans with seals are fine except you shouldnt pick palstic cans up from handle as they will usually break the air tight seal when lifting because the plastic cant handle the weight like a metal can can.even metal ones have been known to leak air from time to time inside when lifted by the handle after wear and tear. A good test is to fill with rocks and submerge in water then try lifting can from handle and check for any bubbles. If you see them youll know it was caused as soon as you applied lifting force away from seal that initiated the separation if the top seal from lifting.test ehould only be done with weight in the can or your not giving the can a True test of weight retention of the air yight seal. I usually lift even my metal cans by supporting the underside of can so as not to disturb the air tight seal and potentially break seal. Another layer of protection is vacuum sealing and then place in cans for an even better chance of air infiltration. O2 absorbers work but only if you're sure no other air is leakingnin first or adding tose into the can would all be invane. Hope this helps...
     
  5. InfoLoader

    InfoLoader Member

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    Worth noting, I bet alot of people think the ammo they stored in ammo cans is airtight because they bought a can which states airtight or a metal ammo can and they just throw it in there and end of story. But by applying opposite force to lift can has a seriously high% chance of beaking seal more than one would ever even stop to think ahout..... by now noone is even reading my post anymore and are contemplating filing their tub with water to do the test i described in the above post to see that i am correct...... Lol..... still Lol....
    I'm a sort of perfectionist/obsessive/compulsive type person who doesnt look at the glass half full or the glass half empty But Rather notice the big chip on the edge of the glass that you could potentially Cut your lip on..
     
  6. crazymike77

    crazymike77 Member

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    When I lived in my 600 square foot apartment, I stored my ammo in 2 of these http://www.homedepot.com/p/Stanley-20-47-50-Gal-Mobile-Tool-Box-037025H/202300294. They had wheels so i could move them around. and I could lock them so I sorta met the CA requirment for having ammo in a secure splace. One had rifle and pistol ammo the other shotgun. I tried to keep the ammo in there in plastic ammo can for rifle and pistol for shotgun in the box they came in.

    When I moved to my house I wanted to turn one of the bed rooms into a gun room, but that was shut down fast as I was told one was to be an office and one a guest room so I took over the small area I call a basement. Under the stairs I was able to place a job site box. That is 48x24x28 Then I put my ammo in 50 cal and 30 cal ammo boxes and store it in there. A few months ago I picked up a stack on ammo cabinet that some guy had lost the keys to so I put a slide bolt on it and a pad lock. I keep ammo in the factory boxes in that and stuff in the mtm ammo boxes for some of my small batch reloads.
     
  7. claiborne

    claiborne Member

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    I use surplus ammo cans to store bulk or packaged (MTM or factory boxes) ammo, as well as powder and primers. These cans are stored in an old pickup truck toolbox that is not labeled "ammo" and kept in my garage.
     
  8. bassjam

    bassjam Member

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    For a handsy brother I'd go with a swift pop on the skull to keep my ammo safe!

    But past that there's plenty of choices if you want to keep your ammo locked up. I just depends on how much money you can afford:

    https://www.amazon.com/Rubbermaid-A...=1489172128&sr=8-2&keywords=lockable+bin&th=1

    https://www.amazon.com/Stack-On-ASC...8&qid=1489171293&sr=8-1&keywords=ammo+cabinet

    https://www.amazon.com/Salsbury-Ind...e=UTF8&qid=1489171343&sr=8-9&keywords=lockers


    When I had roommates I went with the cheapest option:
    https://www.amazon.com/Copper-Creek...TF8&qid=1489172471&sr=1-27&keywords=door+lock

    It wasn't that I didn't trust them, it was a couple of their sketchy friends that often came over.
     
  9. Chuck R.

    Chuck R. Member

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    They were cheap at one time!

    Chuck
     
  10. ilbob

    ilbob Member

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    ammo cans.

    i have a wooden cabinet I bought to store ammo in that I put a padlock on. it won't stop anyone from getting in but it will discourage kids from fooling around in it.

    I had to beef up the shelf supports because they were not designed to hold the weight of ammo.

    If I had it to do again I think I would probably get a job box of some kind that is a little sturdier and a little more secure.
     
  11. FL-NC

    FL-NC Member

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    I put the ammo in ammo cans then I mark them and put the cans in one of those job-box tool boxes. Keeps it all together in 1 place and secure. I lock it with those stupid cable locks you get when you buy a new gun nowadays.
     
  12. Zebraranger

    Zebraranger Member

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    Also in metal cans.
     
  13. jeepnik

    jeepnik Member

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    GI metal cans with good seals, and some absorbent packs tossed in. Neat freak that I am each can is marked with the contents to include caliber and load. It's nice to just grab the appropriate can and go.
     
  14. Guilty

    Guilty Member

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    I store my ammo, and reloading supplies, in military ammo cans in Rubbermaid 2 door freestanding storage sheds with padlocks in my garage. The ammo cans can be expensive to buy, but there are deals if you do regular price searches. It is surprising how many can be accumulated over time, especially if you reload your own ammunition.
     
  15. John Joseph

    John Joseph Member

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    I'd go to the ReStore and pick up an old lockable steel filing cabinet. If no local ReStore then look on Craig's List or estate auctions. .50 and .30 GI Ammo cans will fit inside.
    Pick up two steel filing cabinets and a solid core door and you'll have a pretty good reloading bench as well.
     
  16. hdwhit

    hdwhit Member

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    Yes, it is possible to jerk up a heavily loaded ammunition can and generate enough flexure in the lid to break the seal, although the amount of air/water allowed in (or out, depending on the relative pressures) during that momentary "snap" of the lid is likely to be immaterial.

    Still, since I have steel ammunition cans that are buried in various locations, all of my "crucial cans" have a bead of silicone sealant around the rubber gasket to avoid losing the seal due to degration of the seal, rusting of the metal or the movement of the can within the hole.
     
  17. hdwhit

    hdwhit Member

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    Ah, who would have ever thought of Habitat for Humanity becoming a source for reloading accessories? Seriously, John has a good idea here and the ReStore is a good place to pick up stuff like that.
     
  18. ponchh

    ponchh Member

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    Old refrigerator is as good as it gets for ammo or reloading supplies storage.
    Nope the shelves won't get it done, you will have to build some. Mine are steel. Wood 2x2 with hurricane brackets would work. Use 1/4 in. Bolts, don't depend on wood screws to support 100#.
    Back of shelves 1/4 in. Lower than front to keep weight to back a little. Attach shelves to wall with L angles.
    Make DESICCANT PACKS with kitty litter. Will read on back of package 100% SILICA
    If it has clay or anything else in it you don't want it. Some 20 cup coffee filters and a stapler, you ready to make lots of desiccant packs.
     
  19. ohihunter2014

    ohihunter2014 Member

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  20. Ks5shooter

    Ks5shooter Member

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    It varies but right now the word SALUTE will get you 10 percent off 49 dollars or more until midnight tonight:thumbup::thumbup:
     
  21. Big7

    Big7 Member

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    Big saltwater coolers are your friend if you have limited indoor space.

    Majority of mine are in a fairly new tool shed in saltwater coolers.

    No problems so far.

    Carry fodder, varmint and extreme range hunting loads are in the house
    in a safe.
     
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