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How much gets thrown away?

Discussion in 'Hunting' started by HankR, Dec 5, 2013.

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  1. HankR

    HankR Member

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    So, a smaller size (#5 vs #8) just costs me time, assuming good quality? When people say "more than 2 deer a year", they are referring to the time I'll spend, not necessarily wearing out the grinder?

    Thanks for the food for thought (and the pics of real food). I appreciate the time you all took to help educate me.

    Hank
     
  2. 3212

    3212 Member

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    For what its worth, the PA Game Commission says you get 44% meat yield of the live weight from our deer.I have found this to be pretty accurate depending on bullet damage.I usually get 55 to 65 lbs from a 140 to 150 lb adult.
     
  3. buck460XVR

    buck460XVR Member

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    Better grinders grind meat better. They do this because more power keeps the feed and the cutting by the plates consistent. It also means the meat can be ground partially frozen and thus not allowed to warm up and have the taste degrade. Cheap, small grinders will not readily grind semi-frozen meat and will turn it into mush more so than good looking burger. Spending more time trying to grind the meat makes it warm up to room temperature, thus degrading taste. The cheaper grinders also do not do a good job at grinding tendons and sinew so the meat needs to be trimmed more or the grinder will clog. Larger grinders also take larger chunks of meat, this meat needs to be handled less when processing. I like to coarse grind my venison burger....once for use in Chili, twice for everything else. I also like to keep my meat in larger pieces and grind the burger in smaller quantities as I need it, as ground meat tends to degrade in the freezer faster than whole meat. If I am going to add beef or pork fat to the burger, I do it at the time of cooking as the other fats, especially pork, tends to break down and rancify, even when frozen, when exposed to the enzymes found in venison. This is why sausage, bologna and wieners your butcher makes from your venison tastes so good when you first bring it home, but gets a "freezer" taste to it after being frozen for several months.
     
  4. baronthered

    baronthered Member

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    Lots of opinions on what is wastefull and what is not. I'd recommend getting as much as you can/want in the environment that is available.

    As to grinders; a few years ago being unemployed and wanting to save some cash i found the largest hand grinder I could find at the local "junk store" and a relatively slow speed motor and cobbled them together to get a good powered grinder. not pretty but it'll churn through LOTS of meat.
     
  5. Lloyd Smale

    Lloyd Smale Member

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    first like buck460 said a bigger grinder just does a better job. They have bigger motors along with bigger throats for easier feeding and a good grinder will grind faster then you can feed it. i sure wouldnt fool with any grinder smaller then a #8 and even wouldnt fool with a #8 unless it was a good all steal grinder from a reputable company. you may only grind one deer a year now into burger but that could change in the future and if you ever want to fool with making summer sauage or beef sticks or something else that requires a second grind, it brutal work with a small grinder trying to push allready ground meat through it where as with a big grinder its a joy. I had one of those cabela #10s with the white plastic motor cover. I made alot of sausage with that grinder but it was work. The first day i used my weston i was flat in love. It usually took me about 3 hours to process 16 sticks of summer sausage from raw meat to stuffed. With the new grinder that time was cut right in half and my arms werent sore from trying to push meat through a grinder. Id sell guns before i sold this grinder! even if i only had to use it for one deer a year.
     
  6. Andrew Leigh

    Andrew Leigh Member

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    Although limited to African game species this is an excellent yield calculator based on a variety of hunting areas (yes they get bigger and smaller dependant on area) you can also select the % of condition you believe based on the feed available.

    Have a look purely for interest sake, I think the percentages will be very much the same. You will note a financial calculator as we pay for all our deer, put in a value for the calculator to work.

    http://www.stealthadventures.co.za/CarcassProcessingCalculator.aspx
     
  7. HankR

    HankR Member

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    you may only grind one deer a year now into burger but that could change in the future

    My concern is that it may change the other way. My son has a tag to fill, and supposedly loves to hunt. It was snowy yesterday, and we did work outside for an hour or so, and it was cold, but not cold (Probably right around 0, with very little wind). We knocked off early so we could warm up before coming back out, but he didn't bother to go sit out at dusk. I'd hate to drop $300 on a grinder and have him outgrow hunting. He's 15 and what is "cool" changes on an hourly basis. I never hunted growing up. I like it OK, but I'm not obsessed (well, yet anyway). Hunting is mainly time to spend w/ my son (and maybe in a few years my daughter) and a chance to teach him to do things for himself.
     
  8. Lloyd Smale

    Lloyd Smale Member

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    you have a point too hank. Ive got a couple grand rapped up in butcher tools. We shoot crop damage deer and i use the stuff alot. But ive also thought that if this ended all these tools would be an overkill for one or two deer a year. One thing though is even if i only did one deer id rather do it on a good grinder then a cheap one. But then if i knew it would on be one deer a year i doubt i would have bothered buying it.
     
  9. coyote315

    coyote315 Member

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    There is little waste on a deer.

    A good grinder salvages a lot of the marginal meat. Combine w/ 10% liver for healthy sausage.

    The scraps you don't use, roast then boil for stock w/ the rib and long bones.
    Keep the stock, strain off the rest, use for dog food (except the cooked bones)

    Boil the fat (trimmed) alone, throw it in the blender/ food processor, and bring it to boil again. Let it cool skim off and use for soap. The junk underneath is the same as premium wet dog food, minus the salt and chemicals. If you don't have dogs, use it for trapping or coyote bait.

    Everything else is bait for fish or coyotes. Which should fill maybe a 5 gallon bucket, counting the pelvis and spine.

    Do it right, and one deer start to finish takes one day. No muss, no fuss, no time to spoil and nothing but pleasure in your toil.
     
  10. 788Ham

    788Ham Member

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    Grind up the neck portion? Man, there are good neck roasts on there, thats just plain lazy ! If they had to depend on that deer to make it through the winter, I hope they starve. From the sounds of your friends, they're just plain wasteful !
     
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