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Inspecting the Bore of a Brand New Gun?

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by Bruno2, May 13, 2013.

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  1. 12many

    12many Member

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    yes. I often check it before use even if not new or when cleaning it. ALso check it when I buy it before leaving shop if possible, such as with a bolt action.
     
  2. Bruno2

    Bruno2 Member

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    Bill I agree, I really have to know the previous owner of a gun like a bolt action rifle before I will buy it used. Not too many people know the damage that leaving a bore dirty after a range trip causes. The possibility of throat erosion or letting a bbl get too hot when shooting is another issue as well. I would rather buy one new if I don't know the type of gun owner a used rifle is coming from.

    A rifle bore will copper foul after about 15 rnds and to maintain accuracy it needs to be brushed before firing another 15. The accuracy will drop off if you don't do this. It is very obvious when shooting that a bbl is fouling when it quits grouping as well as it did.
     
  3. MutinousDoug

    MutinousDoug Member

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    About 12 years ago a friend and I decided to get into NRA High Power so we bought AR lower receivers and parts, assembled uppers and went to town. As a matter of course he pushed a patch through the bore and it hung up. After some work, he got it through, torn almost in half.
    An inspection of the bore revealed a curl of steel in the bore from the gas port drill. A return to the manufacturer corrected the issue.
    I wonder how much that curl would have damaged the bore should he have put a round down the bore and never known? Obviously the mfgr didn't bother test firing the upper.
    A quick bore inspection is cheap insurance.
     
  4. Hokkmike

    Hokkmike Member

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    Add me to the inspect and clean crowd. Never know what oil lurks therein.
     
  5. GBExpat

    GBExpat Member

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    With the exception of a very small percentage of shooters/shooting-type, what you have described is far beyond what I would consider to be "overzealous" for every single one of the many firearms that I own.

    Also, keep in mind that while cleaning too little can effect accuracy, so can cleaning too much. ;)
     
  6. pockets

    pockets Member

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    What RC said in post #6.

    A 'brand-spanking-new' or a 'used-but-new-to-me' gun gets cleaned & lubed before shooting.
    .
     
  7. AlexanderA

    AlexanderA Member

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    Inspecting the bore of a new gun should be a no-brainer. Manufacturers often put a rust-inhibiting wick (cardboard tube) in there, or leave lots of grease. If you shot the gun with the wick still inside, it would be like a barrel obstruction and could blow up the gun!
     
  8. COgunner

    COgunner Member

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    I did on a brand new, name-brand pistol and discovered NO RIFLING in the bore. Probably wouldn't have shot very well.:eek:
     
  9. LeonCarr

    LeonCarr Member

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    A buddy bought a brand new Remington 700 BDL .270 that would not chamber factory ammo, like they had used a roughing reamer and forgot the finish reamer or polishing :).

    Sent it to the factory, brand new barrel, free of charge.

    Yes, I inspect new ones :).

    Just my .02,
    LeonCarr
     
  10. WoodchuckAssassin

    WoodchuckAssassin Member

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    You're not paranoid if their really out to get you. Haha! I do the same thing. Heck, I do a complete takedown before I use it at the range. Something else I take careful note of is the condition of the barrel crown. A gun can still preform if the bore is a little fuddled up, but if the muzzel is damaged in any way, you're looking at a costly repair.
     
  11. x_wrench

    x_wrench Member

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    after the purchase of my last new rifle, i will be taking a bore light, and an eye loupe with me when i pick out another one. be it pistol or rifle. the rifle was a Marlin 1895g 45-70. the bore in that thing was so rough, it would shred cleaning patches!
     
  12. tactikel

    tactikel Member

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    I disassemble, clean and lube every firearm I acquire. My Mossberg 835 yielded 4 patches full of some brown rust inhibitor! After a good cleaning it patterns great.
     
  13. Old Dog Man

    Old Dog Man Member

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    Checking New Rifle and Pistol Barrels

    I always check them wheather mine or a customers when, I was smithing I found several that the rifling saw not hammer forged all the way back to the freebore evenly. Never found a button rifled barrel that way or a pistol. Al
     
  14. Deus Machina

    Deus Machina Member

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    I always check everything new. Want to catch any defects, uncleaned shavings, or overzealous greasing before I shoot anything.

    For instance, a friend bought a Mosin Nagant that, aside from a few bubbles, was packed almost muzzle to chamber with old half-gummed grease. Just enough you couldn't see it without looking straight in, the outside was most free of cosmoline, and a round would have chambered perfectly fine. The first shot would not have been fun.
     
  15. Bruno2

    Bruno2 Member

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    I hope this guy has been reading the thread.
     
  16. pintler

    pintler Member

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    I found a 4 or 5 inch 'tail' from a plastic zip tie halfway down the bore of a brand new 223 once.

    Pulling a patch through doesn't take much time.
     
  17. Scooter22

    Scooter22 Member

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    I do since the 80s. I bought brand new a Win 94AE from a dealer. Got it home and was giving it the once over and found one of the grooves in the barrel looked like a RR track. Dealer didn't want to know nothin so I had to send it back to the factory. Needles to say I was really PO'd.:cuss:
     
  18. deputy tom

    deputy tom Member

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    I agree with pockets' post #31. tom. :cool:
     
  19. 22-rimfire

    22-rimfire Member

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    I usually check the bore as part of my inspection of any gun I am interested in buying.

    I have to chuckle... I am mostly a DA revolver person. I was buying a single action and I checked to make sure it was unloaded and proceeded to try to sight down the bore. Looked like I was trying to shoot myself. I laughed when I realized I couldn't "see" anything anyway that way without removing the cylinder.

    I don't field strip new guns. I do run a patch down the barrel before shooting the first time.
     
  20. Krandock

    Krandock Member

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    I have been selling firearms for about 15 years. This statement is very true. Some manufactures recommend cleaning the firearm before firing.
     
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