Quantcast

Issue with Hornady Match Grade FLS

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by syhunt, Oct 9, 2019.

  1. Metal God

    Metal God Member

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2015
    Messages:
    273
    Measure the OD of the neck of your fired brass . If it's .008+ larger then your sized OD neck . You will need to size your necks in .005 increments or use the expander button when sizing to equal the necks . Yep I'm not kidding , I went through this with the Redding bushing dies and for reasons still not clear to me . For what ever reason if you need to size your necks more then .007 or .008 using bushing dies you either have to also still use the expander button or size the necks in increments of .005 or less . Meaning if your fired neck measures .318 and you want .310 , you first size with a .314 bushing then again with a .310 bushing .

    I know this seems odd but it's true . The reason many have never heard of this is standard dies size the neck way to much and the expander is needed to size them back out resulting in removing that unevenness we see when using a bushing die without expander when sizing the neck down more then .007 to .008 .

    But don't take my word for it , Read my thread on another forum and the corresponding emails to Redding .
    https://thefiringline.com/forums/sh...ght=does+your+redding+type+sizing+die+do+this

    Quoted from Redding email in link above
    ( I have pasted below a quick explanation of how this can occur.
    It has come to our attention through customer calls and our own use of the bushing style sizing dies that in certain instances, a given neck sizing bushing will produce a case neck diameter that can be several thousandths of an inch smaller than the actual diameter of the bushing. This idiosyncrasy occurs when the neck diameter of the fired case is a great deal larger than the diameter of the neck sizing bushing, such as occurs when factory chambers are on the large side of the tolerance range. Typically, we have not noticed any problems until the case neck is reduced more than 0.008-0.010". (your fired case .254 - .245 bushing = .009")


    Solutions include, increasing bushing diameter to compensate and/or the use of a size button. Reducing the neck diameter in two smaller steps by using an intermediate diameter bushing will also help. More concentric necks will also result using this method, as the case necks are stressed less during sizing. Don't forget to properly chamfer the inside and outside of the case mouths and apply a light coating of lubricant to the case necks before sizing. )
     
  2. syhunt

    syhunt Member

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2019
    Messages:
    31
    Location:
    wTX
    @Blue68f100 that is how I selected the .309 and .310 bushings. Loaded round diameters are .3125 for my Nosler brass and .313 for hornady brass.

    @FLIGHT762 thank you for clarifiying. I’m on the same page there. Ive heard of Larry Willis’ collet die. I don’t think I need that yet but heard good things and its in my back pocket for order some day if needed.

    @Metal God that is interesting, thank you for sharing. My fired cartridges avg 0.3155” - 0.316” so i might be in the same boat. Is it worth testing with this sized problem brass?
     
  3. Metal God

    Metal God Member

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2015
    Messages:
    273
    I don't know that's up to you . If It's just a few , use those for your lower charges and or sighting in shots . If you have hundreds of them sized that way you might consider sizing them again with the expander ( neck only if you have that choice ). I use my expander more now and it does not seem to be effecting me to much . Keeping in mind it's not completely defeating the purpose of the bushing die if you use the expander . Remember by using a bushing die you are not sizing down or working the neck as much to begin with as a standard sizing die . So the expander is working the brass less as well when it pulls back through . How much does that matter , for me not to much but I'm not a 1k yard benchrest shooter . With my LC brass and factory Savage model 10 and Ruger PR and American ( all in 308 ) I can shoot sub MOA out to 300yds all day long . I've never been able to shoot in the 1's or 2's but maybe that's cus of my crappy brass and bushing dies :D
     
    Last edited: Oct 27, 2019
    syhunt likes this.
  4. syhunt

    syhunt Member

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2019
    Messages:
    31
    Location:
    wTX
    Ive tried just about everything i can think of with no promising results. I flipped the bushing over thinking maybe it was stamped on the wrong side. Tried resizing with the expander ball (calipered at .284”). One last thing ill try today is to remove the decapper rod. Sam over on the Panhandle Precision channel does this with his Redding Type S dies, although he doesn’t mention why. No matter which way i skin this cat its going to cost me more $$. Anyone want to buy 35 pieces of once fired Nosler brass :)?

    I have 15 new cases left so I’m not dead in the water yet. I have to believe that neck thickness is playing a bigger role. Will probably order a .308 and .307 bushing even though that’s technically .0045-.0055 NT. Might not be a big deal since it’s a magnum and will be used for hunting. Going to order a standard F/L die when I order a ball mic also.

    One last stab in the dark. Would adding a crimp solve this problem? The factory Nosler ammo I have is crimped.
     
  5. FLIGHT762

    FLIGHT762 Member

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2011
    Messages:
    254
    Location:
    Nor Cal/SFO area
    The .307-308 bushing will solve your problem. No, a crimp is not necessary. If you want to use one, go ahead. I load for about 12 bottle neck rifle cartridges and I haven't had the need to crimp. Bolt, lever, autos and pumps, no crimps necessary.

    I do crimp my 38, 357, 41 mag. and 44 mag pistol cartridges. A crimp is necessary for them.
     
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice