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Jack Weaver: Shooting thumb location...

Discussion in 'Handguns: General Discussion' started by Mad Magyar, Aug 24, 2009.

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  1. Mad Magyar

    Mad Magyar Member

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    I don't shoot revolvers too often, but notice how the "Master" positions his shooting thumb resting against the cylinder. From many previous discussions,
    some consider this a "no-no" for a few reasons.
    BTW, this is from a 1962 article...
    Any thoughts or opinions being changed? I find my SS thumb more in a handshake postion...
    t0oxow.jpg
     
  2. rcmodel

    rcmodel Member in memoriam

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    Well, he won't have a bloody thumb from the cylinder latch barking it every shot, that's for sure.

    And you can't fault the guys speed & accuracy, that's for sure too.

    So, it must be good!

    I've shot the hard kicking calibers that way for about 45 years now.

    rc
     
  3. Mad Magyar

    Mad Magyar Member

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    RC, the fact that Jack W. became equally adept with the autoloader; I'm assuming the "high thumb ride" became natural for both..... :)
    Oro, good pts....
     
    Last edited: Aug 25, 2009
  4. Oro

    Oro Member

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    If my hands were that big - maybe ;)

    Take a look at the proportion of his hands and the gun. His hands are easily 25% or more larger than mine - I have a typical US male's hand - glove size Large. His hands are massive, and that must have played a big role in how he decided to settle on the grip he did.

    In particular, try:

    1) to see where the base of his thumb on his right hand is (imagine it from his thumb position - it's partially hidden by his left hand),
    2) now look at his trigger finger - he's got the trigger on the pad of his 2nd phalangeal bone, not the 1st or even in the joint.

    That's a massive reach. I'm not saying what he has to teach is not relevant because of that massive set of hands. In fact when I finally read what Jack Weaver said about gripping a handgun, instead of letting others interpret it for me, my shooting got much better. He's one of the true "gurus" of handgunning in my book.
     
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