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Kids Hearing Protection Suggestions

Discussion in 'Shooting Gear and Storage' started by CKweigand, Feb 23, 2018.

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  1. CKweigand
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    CKweigand Member

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    Hey Everyone,
    My four year old son (oldest) has been helping me out quite a bit in the reloading room here lately. He’s my number one guy when it comes to cleaning and sorting brass, lol.

    Now he’s starting to ask me to take him shooting. Which is awesome!!! I told him to consider it done but before we do so, we need to invest in some hearing protection.

    I want to make sure his hearing is completely protected and not end up like me.

    I’m looking for suggestions on earmuffs designed for little kids that meet the decibel level requirements for shooting firearms.
    Any fathers or mothers that have been down this road before, what did you find to be the best options available. Any help would be great! Thank you!


    CK
     
  2. rabid wombat

    rabid wombat Member

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    For my daughter, I started with Pro Ears Passive. As she has grown up, I have bought her a set of the electronic Pro Ears. Regardless, the key issue is fit. Gaps or space around the muff defeat the sound protection. Db rating helps, but does not help if the fit is poor. The fit can be compromised by the way a weapon is mounted. Sorry - not more specific.

    https://proears.com/
     
  3. George P

    George P Member

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    Don't forget eye protection. Personally, if you're talking about anything louder than a .22, he needs plugs AND muffs.
     
  4. CKweigand
    • Contributing Member

    CKweigand Member

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    Thanks wombat and George. He’s used to the safety glasses now that he’s been with me in the reloading room. I think I’m going to go with the junior peltors and see how they fit him.
     
  5. 1KPerDay

    1KPerDay Member

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    Get small sized plugs also. Guns are loud.
     
  6. Ruezim

    Ruezim Member

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    My oldest will be 7 this spring and we started shooting last spring. He is still only using my pellet gun, but we shoot at the local range so there is others shooting at times. I use a set of electric muffs for him that way he can hear me talk clearly, but still will cut out the back ground shooting. That seems to have to have been the best fit for us so far.
     
  7. Walkalong

    Walkalong Moderator

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    Plugs and muffs, not too close to the shooting, no heavy hitters. Hearing is precious and tinnitus is a .... well, it sucks.
     
    Grayrock and George P like this.
  8. khari

    khari Member

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    Like many folks on the board I have several sets of ear protection, from inexpensive to expensive, passive and electronic. I wanted to get my 7 seven year old son the best ear protection I could find so I dug around and came up with the Peltor X5 earmuffs. I have to say, I'm more impressed with the noise protection on these than I am with any of my others. I like them so much I bought a pair for me, my wife and my father.
     
  9. Varminterror

    Varminterror Member

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    Muffs aren’t enough for centerfires. Plugs and muffs. String plugs are nice, run them through the tag in the kid’s shirt or tie them around their shooting glasses. I have 4 pairs of child sized muffs, I’ll have to look to see what brand, I know they were about $35 each when I got them.

    I was still a kid when I lost over 50% of my hearing in my left ear and developed tinnitus, only 12yrs old. A couple range trips with a 44mag and a 270win, and the damage was irreparable, so I get to live with that the rest of my life. My son, 4 now, wears plugs and muffs any time we’re shooting.

    For kids of sufficient age, electronic muffs are great. The kids need to be old enough to understand the speakers are turned up too loud (hearing damage from your hearing protection!), but having better ability to hear instructions is a huge advantage. It goes hand in hand, by the time they are old enough to recognize when the volume is too high, they’re also typically old enough to follow instructions better and operate at the range more autonomously, so we end up getting outside of elbow reach (closer than arms’ reach), and audible commands are more important, so electronic muffs are a great safety device.
     
    Walkalong likes this.
  10. GRIZ22

    GRIZ22 Member

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    You also need to consider lead exposure if he's helping you in the reloading room. It takes much less lead to affect a young one.
     
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