Loads for S&W Model 25 45 Colt

Barmcd

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I see load data for 1873 Army clones and modern Ruger revolvers. Is there separate data for Smith and Wesson N frame revolvers in 45 Colt? I’m interested in a modern revolver and favor S&W over Ruger. I’d think they could handle a pretty stout load since they are also chambered in 44 mag.
 
The difference being that the .45 puts bigger holes in the cylinder with thinner walls, especially at the cylinder stop notches.

Brian Pearce came up with graduated loads for different revolvers; I recall he lumped the M25-5 in with recent production SAAs for loads up to 23000 psi because those guns are also made in .45 ACP and should therefore handle .45 Colt at .45 ACP +P pressures.

Earlier thread at https://www.thehighroad.org/index.php?threads/handloader-337s-23k-psi-45-colt-loads.903095/

Unfortunately I cannot find that article for free download any more, but Handloader will cheerfully sell you a copy.
 
They are chambered in .44Mag but those also shoot loose with factory loads. They are not deemed strong enough for "Ruger only" loads. In the Blackhawk, the cylinder is the weakest link. In the S&W, it's the frame/lockwork, which has more to do with the design than anything. As Jim said, they should be kept to .45ACP equivalent loads at 21-23,000psi. If you want to regularly shoot +300gr bullets, S&W is not a good launching platform.
 
I have a "Mountain Gun" in .45 Colt. My standard load is a 255 gr coated Keith SWC over 5.0gr of Clays with a Federal primer. Velocity is a bit over 820fps. Soft-shooting and very accurate.
With the correct placement, I'd be happy to use it anything from cottontails to deer.
 
I run with 8 grains of unique in my SW 25-5. 200 -250 grain bullets.
I love that load. I believe that’s one of John Taffin’s favorite loads. I use a 255 grain Bear Creek Supply moly coated RNFP bullets for that load.
John Taffin on the .45 Colt:

I load all my .45 Colt for my model 25-15 within SAAMI specs.

After I got my model 25-15 I called Smith & Wesson and asked them about what type of ammo and loads the 25-15 would safely withstand. I asked if the 25 was as stout as the model 29 or variants of the 29 in .44 Magnum. I was basically told “Use only ammunition loaded within SAAMI specifications in your model 25. The 25 and the 29 are made differently with different processes for hardening the steel.
Do not use Ruger only loads in your model 25”
 
There's an issue of Handloader magazine that has some 45 Colt data for the M25, I bought it because I had one and I don't have it anymore but it has a lot of data. It's the April 2022 edition (No. 337), it's got a lot of good data from Brian Pearce, real good stuff you can order an issue from their website.

From what I've gathered from the article, the M25 is capable of 23K PSI level loads
 
Here are some .45 Colt loads that are accurate from my model 25-15.

- 255 grain RNFP over 8 grains of Unique

- 255 grain RNFP over 7.2 grains of Universal. It’s about 825fps

- 205 grain RNFP over 5.9 grains of Trail Boss. Low recoil. Soft shooting at approximately 750fps.

- 205 grain RNFP over 8.7 grains of Universal. This load is traveling just over 1000fps.
 
For my 25-5's, I stick to standard 45 Colt pressures. No hot rodding for me.

I pressed my first 25-5 into IHMSA Silhouette competition once when I cracked the forcing cone on my 357 Magnum Model 19.

If I hit the 200 meter rams, it would topple. But the rainbow trajectory was brutal. I had to aim about 20 feet above the b erm to hit the rams.

The advantage of 44 Magnum or 357 Magnum was the flatter trajectory out to the 200 meter rams.

Anyway, for moderate sized game, I figured the standard 45 Colt loads were adequate. If I was hunting something more dangerous, I'd get something more powerful.
 
Thanks for the input. I've got a Uberti Cattleman with a 5 1/2" barrel and I've been told its a very strong firearm for a 1873 clone. I understand people are shooting loads up to 1000 FPS which is a lot stouter load than I currently use. I'm using 9.9 gr. of Accurate No. 5 which nets me 750 FPS with a 250 grain bullet. It's an accurate soft shooting load. I'm thinking of buying a model 25 in 45 Colt and wondered how hot a load you could shoot in that gun. It just seems like an N frame should be stronger than an 1873 clone. I won't making hot loads for it
 
The difference being that the .45 puts bigger holes in the cylinder with thinner walls, especially at the cylinder stop notches.

Brian Pearce came up with graduated loads for different revolvers; I recall he lumped the M25-5 in with recent production SAAs for loads up to 23000 psi because those guns are also made in .45 ACP and should therefore handle .45 Colt at .45 ACP +P pressures.

Earlier thread at https://www.thehighroad.org/index.php?threads/handloader-337s-23k-psi-45-colt-loads.903095/

Unfortunately I cannot find that article for free download any more, but Handloader will cheerfully sell you a copy.
 
I see load data for 1873 Army clones and modern Ruger revolvers. Is there separate data for Smith and Wesson N frame revolvers in 45 Colt? I’m interested in a modern revolver and favor S&W over Ruger. I’d think they could handle a pretty stout load since they are also chambered in 44 mag.
I keep my .45C loads no hotter than 800-825 fps MV in any of my revolvers chambered for it, and I have three; a 4"S&W M25-5, a 5-1/2" Uberti 1873 Colt SAA, and a 7-1/2" Taylor's (Uberti) Remington 1875, and that's my own chronographed data and not what the manuals list. I know them to be safe loads and they don't beat up the guns. There's no real point in pushing hot loads in these guns. A 250 grain JHP or RNFP will go through a white tail at 50 yards at that velocity and a shoulder shot will knock it off its feet like it had been hit by a car. The same load I make for the revolvers will go just under 1000 fps in my Henry Big Boy with a 20" barrel. I've done some heavier loads for the rifle, up to 1100 fps using the same bullets, but their only advantage is a slightly flatter trajectory for 100 yard shooting.

The Hornady manual splits .45C handloads into three categories in the manual: rifle, "standard" revolvers, and another for Thompson and Ruger handguns. I've founf using the standard loads and working up a little at a time gave me better results for the rifle than using the rifle data. Accurate #5 works great for the handgun loads, Accurate #9 is good for the rifle (slightly slower powder). Power Pistol works well for both.
 
I keep my .45C loads no hotter than 800-825 fps MV in any of my revolvers chambered for it, and I have three; a 4"S&W M25-5, a 5-1/2" Uberti 1873 Colt SAA, and a 7-1/2" Taylor's (Uberti) Remington 1875, and that's my own chronographed data and not what the manuals list. I know them to be safe loads and they don't beat up the guns. There's no real point in pushing hot loads in these guns. A 250 grain JHP or RNFP will go through a white tail at 50 yards at that velocity and a shoulder shot will knock it off its feet like it had been hit by a car. The same load I make for the revolvers will go just under 1000 fps in my Henry Big Boy with a 20" barrel. I've done some heavier loads for the rifle, up to 1100 fps using the same bullets, but their only advantage is a slightly flatter trajectory for 100 yard shooting.

The Hornady manual splits .45C handloads into three categories in the manual: rifle, "standard" revolvers, and another for Thompson and Ruger handguns. I've founf using the standard loads and working up a little at a time gave me better results for the rifle than using the rifle data. Accurate #5 works great for the handgun loads, Accurate #9 is good for the rifle (slightly slower powder). Power Pistol works well for both.
I use two different loads in my rifle, my normal pistol load of Accurate No. 5 and a 250 grain Berry's bullet gives me about 750 FPS. It gains over 200 FPS in the rifle. I also use 2400 which gives me over 1400 FPS in the rifle using Hornady XTP JHP bullets. I use the hotter loads for shooting steel targets at 100 yards. I load those in nickel cases so I don't accidentally use them in a handgun. My initial question came about because I thought a S&W N frame would have been stronger than an Italian 1873 clone.
 
My old Hodgen manual has a section on "Ruger Only" loads. Pressure is given for each load. When loading for my Colt New Service, I find starting loads at or below 21,000 PSI and that's what I go with,
 
My old Hodgen manual has a section on "Ruger Only" loads. Pressure is given for each load. When loading for my Colt New Service, I find starting loads at or below 21,000 PSI and that's what I go with,
I don't think the newer Hogdon manual lists pressures, just velocities.
 
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