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Looking at an old Marlin 336

Discussion in 'Firearms Research' started by bobbo, Feb 19, 2011.

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  1. bobbo

    bobbo Member.

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    I've been looking for a deer rifle. At the gun shop, they have a Marlin 336 RC in .35 Remington. The rifle has Ballard-style rifling (not Micro-Groove), a wide walnut forearm stock (compared to others on the rack, it bulges out behind the barrel band), and is not drilled and tapped for a scope mount. Overall, the wood is in very nice condition, as is the metal (like 90% or so).

    Two questions:
    1) When was it made (roughly). I'm thinking late 1950s, myself. I'll get the serial number on Monday, so I can date it more accurately, but trying to get a heads-up now
    2) How much would you pay for it?

    Any info will be appreciated :)

    Thanks,
    --Bobbo
     
  2. waidmann

    waidmann Member

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    The Marlin 336 RC (Regular Carbine) had a run of 1948-68. It was offered in .30-30, .32 Win. Spl. and .35 Rem. The 29th Blue Book puts 100% at $495; 60% at $175.

    85% tracks just south of $300. I suppose an adjustment for two years inflation is appropriate.

    Unless you have a compelling reason to have a .35 Rem. I'd pass in favor of a .30-30. Likely one that is already drilled and tapped.
     
  3. towboat_er

    towboat_er Member

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    I've been on the lookout for one of those. They are hard to find. Any I've found were overpriced.
     
  4. bobbo

    bobbo Member.

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    What's your definition of overpriced? $350? I honestly don't know, that's why I'm asking :) .
     
  5. Boxerrider

    Boxerrider Member

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    D&T

    A 336 in 35 Rem, with Ballard rifling that has not been drilled & tapped for a scope is harder to find than a later model in 30-30 so that will tend to push the price up. A Gunbroker.com search for guns that sold will allow you to match the rifle and condition with what somebody really paid for it.

    Collector value depends on original condition so if you are wanting to hunt with a scope I would look for a slightly newer one that came drilled & tapped from the factory. Street values vary widely across the country depending on availability.

    30-30 ammo is cheap & plentiful. 35 Rem is neither.

    Enjoy!
     
  6. waidmann

    waidmann Member

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    For me $350 is overpriced. I don't collect leverguns. I agree with the notion that .32's especially and .35's to a lesser degree don't offer enough in comparison to a .30-30 to justify the bother. If this were to be my first deer rifle I would be inclined to scope it. Three or four holes at $25 or so a hole jacks the price up.

    If you want this gun, consider it in the context of its condition and the Blue Book or what they are bringing on the auction sites weighing about $60 in expenses (or more) versus sales tax at the LGS.
     
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