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Mutton tallow

Discussion in 'Blackpowder' started by geraldbergeron, Jul 25, 2006.

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  1. geraldbergeron

    geraldbergeron Member

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    Hi,

    I want to follow rules from my ancestors ( I mean Gatofeo, hope he is not that old... LOL).

    I got a few pounds of mutton tallow from a nice girl at the public market..

    It is "cholesterol" that was taken around the kidney of mutton...

    I am keeping it "COLD"...

    NOW WHAT ? ? ?

    Option A: I use it AS IT IS to melt with beewax and paraffin ?

    Option B: I cook it ?

    Option C: neither A nor B ... just follow what the members of this forum will tell me to do

    Option D: neither A nor B nor C ... wait for an answer form Gatofeo ?

    Option E: do whatever I think my ancestor would have done ?


    Secondary questions:

    A- When I will put wads in that hot solution, I keep wads on one side only or turn them over to get the SLIPPERY JUICE on both side... ???

    B- Is the microwave as good as other methods of melting ?


    As you can see, I am a little bit (LOL) obsessive.

    Please, be kind enough to answer me tonight or I will not sleep for the next night...

    .................................................Gerald........................................../:banghead:
     
  2. arcticap

    arcticap Member

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    Could you "clarify" (mutton fat pun intended :D ) whether you have tallow that by definition, has already been rendered?
     
  3. geraldbergeron

    geraldbergeron Member

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    Well,

    The butcher took off the fat around the kidneys. And that is what I got.

    :confused:
     
  4. Third_Rail

    Third_Rail Member

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    You'll need to render it into tallow - right now, all you have is fat. :)
     
  5. geraldbergeron

    geraldbergeron Member

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    "You'll need to render it into tallow - right now, all you have is fat."

    I would like to know HOW to render it into tallow ??

    I do not want to ask my wife... she has to see the Ruger Old Army invoice... LOL

    Gerald
     
  6. Third_Rail

    Third_Rail Member

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    I don't remember, though I did it once in Boy Scouts. Smelly, messy, quite unpleasant to do.
     
  7. arcticap

    arcticap Member

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    Rendering involves liquifying and purifying the product. You need to melt it using lower heat, then boil off most of the water, then strain and filter it using a coffee filter. Once you have the more pure product refrigerated, the tallow should harden or float on top and can be separated further from any remaining broth. Then you will have to eventually decide which formula to follow to make your lube concoction with, if you're going to mix it at all. It may involve mixing in beeswax or other ingredients, hopefully with further assistance or research from others with experience. :D
     
  8. Car Knocker

    Car Knocker Member

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    If you Google using the term "rendering tallow", you will find more than you ever wanted to know about this subject.
     
  9. geraldbergeron

    geraldbergeron Member

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  10. Duncaninfrance

    Duncaninfrance Member

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    Gerald

    Once you have got tallow, a good suggestion that I got on here was to soak the felt that I was going to stamp out as wads BEFORE I stamped them out. Soak it both sides and lay it out to dry on a grill of some kind to keep it flat. Then stamp out the wads. Do this with a punch on a cross section of tree stump or large branch/log so as not to damage the cutting edge of the punch. This will make it easy to keep them apart.
    Duncan
     
  11. Manyirons

    Manyirons member

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    Ya know, unless yer jus DYIN fer the stench and nasty of renderin, ya could jus BUY tha lube already made up!

    "Gatofeo Number One Lube" i named it and BIGIRON sells it!
     
  12. Third_Rail

    Third_Rail Member

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    Thom, Thom, everyone should render fat so they know why it's such a better idea to buy the lube if possible. :D
     
  13. Manyirons

    Manyirons member

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    Yup! Spose its like hittin yerself on tha head witha hammer, ya gotta do it ta know!
     
  14. Duncaninfrance

    Duncaninfrance Member

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    Why not just roast the lamb and see what is left over THEN go and buy some :neener:
    Duncan
     
  15. geraldbergeron

    geraldbergeron Member

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    Gatofeo Number One Lube

    Manyirons said:

    Where can i find that on the site ? Or I am totally blind...LOL

    ...........................................................................Gerald........../
     
  16. Manyirons

    Manyirons member

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    Lookit tha tag line on Third Rails post!
     
  17. Manyirons

    Manyirons member

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    Oh!

    Its by tha stick fer five bucks or a four ounce bulk fer $12.50.
     
  18. gmatov

    gmatov member

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    Rendering the lamb fat is easier than frying bacon. Most bacon is water cured, so it spatters all over the stove when you fry it.

    You lanb fat is almost pure fat, dice it as small as you can and put it in a kettle, a large saucepan, whatever, put it on the stove, turn up the heat, stir it till it gets submerged in melted fat, then it will be like deepfrying it.

    When the cracklings are all browned well, you,ve got the bulk of the fat out of it, you can scoop them out and eat them like pork rinds ( I like lamb fat, it's an ethnic thing I guess.), or throw them away.

    Strain the fat through a couple layers of cheesecloth. Pour some of the liquid fat into the batch of lube you're making, if you got one in process.

    Cover and refrigerate, if you want to, but it takes a long time for pure animal fats to go rancid.

    I get mine free, well, 4 to 6 bcks a pound, if you consider the fat that bakes out of the lamb I barbecue is part of the weight of the roast or ribs or whatever. Figure that they would charge more if they cut off all the fat, mebbe you should say I am getting it free.

    Try buying and barbecuing at high heat a nice leg 'o lamb and you might decide you found a new delicacy.

    Just for the hell of it, Sam Fadala says NO grease has any effect on powder fouling, they won't break down the fouling. Takes water to do that.

    FWIW.

    Cheers,

    George
     
  19. Third_Rail

    Third_Rail Member

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    George - you seem to be leaving steps out. If he were to liquify the fat by heat, strain, and then use as-is, it wouldn't be pure tallow, and it wouldn't work as well (as far as I know)


    You'd need to let it cool after liquifying and straining, then take the top (almost pure white) layer off the cooled fat - this is tallow. My $.02

    :)


    EDIT: George, you're right on this one; I thought you were going by a different procedure (boil the fat in water, go from there) so you'd have to let it cool on top of the water and use that. How much tallow do you lose by doing it the way you described, if any significant amount?
     
  20. RON in PA

    RON in PA Member

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    Ifin some of you folks want a tallow and beeswax patch lube and don't want to mess with rendering and mixing, Dixie Gun Works sells Old Zip patch lube by the tin.
     
  21. gmatov

    gmatov member

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    Third Rail,

    I'd almost bet you asked der Feuhrer if he ever heard of this and he said, Of course, that is what ve did ven ve killed a pig. The only part of the pig ve did not use vas the squeal.

    My apologies to der Hauptmann, I know he does not speak that way. Well, mebbe when he gets excited..

    No, I did not mean to boil it, nor would you, I hope, boil bacon, although with the garbage we buy from the stores, all bacon is more or less boiled, what with all the water in it. I buy slab bacon frequently from Kentucky, home cured and home smoked, and IT does not spatter all over the place like your Superiors and your Sugerdales do. AND, it leaves less fat in the pan than those quasi bacons do. THEM, you WOULD have to seperate into the fat layer and the watery layer.

    Did I just tell you more than you wanted to know? Ask Jule if he would like to buy a slab of bacon for about 30 bucks, about 10 pounds, shipped, from Scott Hams. That is damned cheap, if you consider the garbage you buy in the supermarkets. Actually, I think there is a shipping charge, I know it gets ther in about 3 days, no refrigeration, so you should get the idea it is REAL bacon.

    The fat you render from that will make some more ball lube.

    Cheers,

    George
     
  22. Manyirons

    Manyirons member

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    Scott bacon? Think he already orders that ifin i'm right, ya gotta cut it yerself? Only he calls it SPECK.

    Says when he wassa kid, they'd visit relatives in tha islands, cant spell em, everbody had SHARP pocket knives fer air dried mutton, they'd jus cut a chunk an chew fer awhile!

    Says he WONT eat eels though! Hated em as a kid! Said they'd have salt eels dried like jerky in tha markets. DOES like herring in cream with onions an garlic! Been at his house round breakfast time, some days ya jus gotta take a walk!
     
  23. gmatov

    gmatov member

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    MI,

    Mutton is entirely different than lamb. Mutton is soup meat, or, as jule says, a drying meat. I don't know how they dried it. Here, in the US, smoking was the way to preserve meat, OR, you boiled and put into a crock and covered with melted tallow, to seal out the air, OR, you salt cured it.

    In most of Europe, they made salami of it, or knackwurst, or other sausages.

    Here, again, if you were a native, and this would include the frontiersmaen, who learned from the Indians, you would "jerk" the meat of anything you shot, or you would make "pemmican", pulverized meat, mixed with berries and the like for flavoring, and fat, the fat being the bulk of your energy over the winter, the meat itself being the protien you needed in your diet over the winter.

    Preserved beef is probably why the Brits are even today called "Beefeaters", it was their mainstay on year long ship cruises, or longer.

    They also pickled pork, or salted it, which is the same thing. And herring and anything else which they could make stand still long enough.

    The rest of the world did, too. Ask Jule why there is sauerkraut. Why there is dried beef. Why there are cured sausages and salamis.

    Hell, why is there CHEESE!! Milk from the cow or the camel or the sheep or the yak or the musk ox, or, damme, if you can milk a rabbit, would still sour within a couple days.

    Somehow I think I have veered off topic a bit. What was the question?

    Cheers,

    George
     
  24. gmatov

    gmatov member

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    MI,

    I shoulda picked up on "speck".

    We call it bacon, the Brits call it "streaky bacon", the Canadians probably do, too.

    Here, we make "bacon" only from the sowbelly, the fattiest part of the pig, the "offal", if you will. Should be rendered to fat, but the butchers decided they could charge a premium for it, so today we STILL eat this stuff.

    Canucks consider bacon to be what we call "Canadian Bacon", cured pork loins.

    Brits cure the whole pig. ALL of the pig is bacon. How they charge for it, I don't know.

    I DO know, they use the same process, pincushion of needles, inject with curing solution, tomorrow you got bacon. Enzymes to break down the tissue. Flavotings to make it taste like bacon. Just don't try to eat it after the "sell by" date. Vaccuum packed, my ass. It rots in the package..

    Buy a dry cured slab, hang it in the cellar stairway and cut a chunk off next year, same as last year.

    This is about as OT as you can get here, ain't it?

    Cheers,

    George
     
  25. Duncaninfrance

    Duncaninfrance Member

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    Brits cure the whole pig. ALL of the pig is bacon. How they charge for it, I don't know.
    No it isn't George. Most of it is PORK. Most of the BACON sold in the UK is Danish or Dutch and tastes like fish cos thats what they feed it on. Dry Cured bacon is another thing - wonderful. Cut a slice - in the pan - serve with eggs, sausage, beans, fried bread, mushrooms and black pudding and a bib blob of brown sauce - PERFECTION :D
    Duncan
     
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