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Name These Plants and Their Properties

Discussion in 'Hunting' started by Joshua M. Smith, May 28, 2012.

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  1. Joshua M. Smith

    Joshua M. Smith Member

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    Hi Folks,

    I thought this might be fun to do.

    Can you name these common plants and their useful properties? They are found in Indiana and throughout the Midwest United States, as well as many other areas. They are very common!

    1.
    1.jpg

    2.
    2.jpg

    3.
    3.jpg

    4.
    4.jpg

    Have at it... and post your own pics if you're so inclined, of plants you find useful and/or harmful.

    Regards,

    Josh
     
  2. Bobson

    Bobson Member

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    I recognize the first three from my youth in rural Washington state, but I can't name any of them or their useful properties lol.

    Plant #2 may or may not be what I'm thinking of, but there was one specific point when I had this wound on my ankle. Don't remember what it was or how I got it, but my dad went out and got some of that and wrapped it around that part of my leg with a handkerchief.

    He grew up in Eastern Europe, so Idk if that plant helped, or if it was an old wives tale...
     
  3. Texan Scott

    Texan Scott Member

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    HAHAHA... good stuff for hunters...

    Leaves of three, let them be.... and when you go, take your own TP.

    also, as a rule of thumb... if you see deer pellets and bug eaten plants, but also leaves that neither deer of bugs will eat, there's probably a reason.

    to put down a similar old wives' tale, though- the opposite is NOT true. Just because deer eat it does NOT mean you can (wild rhubarb, for instance). Remember, they have 4-chamber stomachs and regurgitate BY DESIGN... just because they can eat it doesn't mean it won't make you very, very sorry.
     
  4. SimplyChad

    SimplyChad Member

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    Yours look familiar but I really cant be sure.
     

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  5. wankerjake

    wankerjake Member

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    #1 posion Ivy? I don't recognize the others.
     
  6. .45Guy

    .45Guy Member

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    1. Not sure, but not poison ivy. not even close.
    2. is broad leaf plantain, it is edible.
    3. looks like dock... also edible, and a PITA on the farm.
    4. not sure. almost looks like wild turnip
     
    Last edited: May 28, 2012
  7. Sam1911

    Sam1911 Moderator Emeritus

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    Yup, got no 2. Plantain is edible and makes a very decent coagulant. Called the "Soldiers' Herb" for that reason. Also useful, when steeped as a sort of tea, for stopping bleeding after childbirth. Got lots in the yard but never had to use it that way.

    It was not native to North America and spread with the arrival of Europeans, hence another traditional name, "White Man's Footprint."
     
  8. Sam1911

    Sam1911 Moderator Emeritus

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    Here's one most should be able to ID immediately:

    5.
    052812056.jpg
     
    Last edited: May 28, 2012
  9. Sam1911

    Sam1911 Moderator Emeritus

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    How about this:

    6.
    052812054.jpg

    What? Which? What's it good for? What is it related to?
     
    Last edited: May 28, 2012
  10. floorit76

    floorit76 Member

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    Nightshade. Kill you dead.
     
  11. Sam1911

    Sam1911 Moderator Emeritus

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    Eh, sortof. Almost.
     
  12. Sam1911

    Sam1911 Moderator Emeritus

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    [​IMG]

    Chad's looks like "Angelica" aka "Devil's Club" aka "Devil's Walking Stick."

    I kept one as a potted plant in my bedroom back in highschool. I had strange interests. :eek:
     
  13. .45Guy

    .45Guy Member

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    1. Poison Ivy
    2. Nightshade family... belladonna?

    oops... 5 and 6
     
  14. zxcvbob

    zxcvbob Member

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    #6 is peppervine. It is a nightshade but I don't think it's all that poisonous. Related to eggplant, potatoes, peppers, and tomatoes. (i didn't think it was good for anything)
     
  15. zxcvbob

    zxcvbob Member

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    That thorny branch looks kind of like wild rose.
     
  16. drsfmd

    drsfmd Member

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    #3 looks like Rhubarb.
     
  17. Sam1911

    Sam1911 Moderator Emeritus

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    6 is Woody Nightshade or "Bittersweet." (Peppervine? Cool name!) Closer to potatoes and tomatoes (Genus: solanum) than to deadly nightshade, though they look pretty similar. Supposedly good for eczema and ringworm fungus. (Though I don't know how you use it, exactly.)

    It is mildly toxic, but more like tummy ache toxic than "notify next of kin" toxic.
     
  18. Sam1911

    Sam1911 Moderator Emeritus

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    Ha! I was right about the devil's walking stick -- at least Chad's image appears when you google the name! ;)
     
  19. SimplyChad

    SimplyChad Member

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    Its devils walking stick. My dad uses it for tooth aches and when I was a kid a hiker friend of ours cut his leg pretty bad. While my brothers were getting our boat my dad TKed the leg and chewed so of it up to put in the wound. Numbed the guy up pretty quick and helped it clot.
     
  20. Sam1911

    Sam1911 Moderator Emeritus

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    Someone sent me a PM with a request to ID this one:

    5.
    052812056.jpg

    I've had to learn to spot it almost by "Spidey sense" as I'm so sensitive to that my outbreaks cause mass panic in others! :D

    Poison Ivy can look surprisingly different but it will always appear in the clusters of three as everyone knows. But lots of plants put out leaves in threes. The color can be varied from a light grass green to a darker emerald -- and the plant in my photo shows both. It changes with the seasonal foliage, too, often coming out crimson in the fall.

    The surface of the leaves can look like a flat, matte green, or a shinier almost waxy sheen.

    The stalk is a great climber and puts out millions of "hairs" that make it look sort of shaggy as it gets bigger. The leaves can get quite large -- I've seen them 5" wide or more. If the plant is climbing up a tree it will often put out horizontal branches that project 2'-3' from the trunk, each holding a cluster of leaves, and often berry clusters, too.

    As said, it takes on surpisingly different appearances. Around here, there won't be many "teeth." Maybe one or two large (1/4") "teeth" per edge, but the real kicker is that they're always arranged a certain way. The center leaf may have no serrations, or one or two, etc -- and they'll be on both edges. The right leaf will have those big "teeth" only on the right edge (or, if there are a larger number of teeth, the number will be biased to the right edge), and the left leaf will only have them on the left edge (or, again, if there are a larger number of teeth, the number will be biased to the left edge.
     
  21. amflyer

    amflyer Member

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    Like I told my Mother-in-Law..."Leaves of three, wipe with me."
     
  22. Sam1911

    Sam1911 Moderator Emeritus

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    So, Josh? Help us out with 1, 3, and 4! :)
     
  23. SimplyChad

    SimplyChad Member

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    Is he ever gonna put the answers up
     
  24. hang fire

    hang fire Member

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    Poke salad, must be cooked, poisonous otherwise, great with scrabbled eggs or just boil, season, and eat with corn bread for soppens.


    polk4.jpg

    Watermellon berry, delicious, when young before bearing ,is called cucumber weed and we used it a lot in salads when lived in Alaska.

    [​IMG]

    Fireweed flowers, makes some of the best faux honey & syrups there is. Young fireweed leaves and stems are great in fresh salads.

    Fireweed+2.jpg
     
    Last edited: Jun 19, 2012
  25. janobles14

    janobles14 Member

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    is #2 dandelion?
     
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