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new brass prep question

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by Kevwyo, Dec 6, 2008.

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  1. Kevwyo

    Kevwyo Member

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    Just curious what you guys think about the need for brand new brass prep. Just received some brand new Winchester brass in 5.56. Is there a need to run it through a sizing die or do you think I can just start it through the reloading process?
     
  2. R.W.Dale

    R.W.Dale Member

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    if the case mouths are round and not deformed I just load new brass and save the prep for the second loading
     
  3. snuffy

    snuffy Member

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    I at least run new cases part way into my FL die. That makes sure the mouth is round. Then I inside chamfer the neck. That allows the bullet to start without shaving jacket material of the outside of the bullet.

    Some go as far as de-burring the inside of the primer flash hole before loading the first time. Also primer pocket uniforming. Up to you for what you want to do.
     
  4. Kevwyo

    Kevwyo Member

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    thanks .... this brass appears to need no prep work at all as I would expect from brand new brass. Just the same I thought I've heard otherwise and so my question.
     
  5. Ben Shepherd

    Ben Shepherd Member

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    ALWAYS, ALWAYS, ALWAYS run new brass through a FL sizing die. And check them all for proper length as well. Ninety nine percent of the time you'll have no trouble if you don't. But if you do.........:banghead:
     
  6. cracked butt

    cracked butt Member

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    FL size them first, ask me how I know this:p
     
  7. The Bushmaster

    The Bushmaster Member

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    What Ben Shepherd said...Resize, measure (trim if needed), chamfer, debur flash holes and inspect all new brass...
     
    Last edited: Dec 6, 2008
  8. SASS#23149

    SASS#23149 Member

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    FL size always is my rule.same goes for handgun brass.I tried using new brass one time for my hand gun and the bullet has almost zero neck tension .
    ymmv
     
  9. Ben Shepherd

    Ben Shepherd Member

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    Yep.

    1. With rifle/bottleneck brass you will find a few with out-of-round mouths.

    2. Pistol brass, as noted by SASS#23149, will have very poor neck tension. The last batch of new 44 mag winchester brass I did came out of the sizing die .003" smaller than it went in.
     
  10. qajaq59

    qajaq59 Member

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    I prep and inspect mine as well.
     
  11. Remo-99

    Remo-99 Member

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    With brand new brass (unprimed cases) I'm basically just looking to fireform to my chamber, to neck size only for bolt action calibres.

    Once they have been fired, then it's time for me to get serious about case prep.

    It's a little different for an auto loader, but it's rare for quality components to be so far out of wack, that they won't chamber reliably, if loaded correctly.

    As for casemouths being un-round, if boattail bullets are being seated theres no problem there.

    And if I'm loading flatbased bullets I just use a Lee universal casemouth expander to help start them, then crimp off the flare.
     
  12. NCsmitty

    NCsmitty Member

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    Don't start out being lazy in your habits when you reload.

    You need to do an inside and outside neck chamfer to remove burrs, and I give the primer pocket a little chamfer while it's in my hands. Then lube and run through your properly adjusted FL die, and random check the case length to make sure it's holding spec. If it's a fresh setup, I try the first couple brass in the rifle to make sure it fits with the die settings. I never trust the factory to give me perfect cases every time because **** happens.
    I'm the final QC manager in the line.
    I know it's a tedious but necessary step to a good reloading experience.
    Once the case prep is done properly, you can concentrate on developing or shooting your loads more confidently.

    NCsmitty
     
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2008
  13. Remo-99

    Remo-99 Member

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    That is a point too, maybe I should take the next two weeks off work so I can mic up and wiegh each and every one of the 2,000 55gr .224" FMJ's I just bought, just to be sure they are all spot on QC.
     
  14. The Bushmaster

    The Bushmaster Member

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    Yup, Remo-99. Maybe you should...:D
     
  15. Grumulkin

    Grumulkin Member

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    I guess I'm pretty lazy when I reload. In several decades of reloading I have NEVER resized or trimmed new brass. Do you think the brass the manufacturer sends you is any different than what they load factory ammo in? I think not.

    If you're loading all lead or flat based jacketed bullets in the case, it's not a bad idea to chamfer the case mouth. Boat tailed bullets slip right into the case with no problem whether or not the mouth is chamfered.

    Inspecting new cases isn't a bad idea. I bought a lot of new 222 Remington cases once in which several cases had very eccentric flash holes. One was so far off center that I doubt a primer could have lit the powder through it.
     
  16. NCsmitty

    NCsmitty Member

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    Well you boys just go ahead and load any way you want. That's how I do it. I'm retired. LOL

    Oh, and Remo-99, if you're shooting FMJ, it's obvious your not concerned about accuracy anyway. They're probably for your spray and pray technique.

    NCsmitty
     
  17. snuffy

    snuffy Member

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    I think SO! The first thing the factory loading machines do is make the mouth of the cases round. They also expand the mouth a little to ease insertion of the bullet. Most, if not all, of the factory rounds are crimped, so that takes care of the mouth that was flared at the first station.

    Lapua, norma, and now nosler make/sell match cases. Those are the only ones I'd NOT do a partial FL size to before loading. However, I would still chamfer the inside of the mouth with this tool;
    http://www.midwayusa.com/eproductpage.exe/showproduct?saleitemid=342199

    Years ago I was having problems with the case mouth peeling bits of jacket material off the driving surface of the bullets. That was AFTER using one of the commonly available 45 degree chamfer tools. Especially the nosler ballistic tips. I got one of the VLD Lyman tools, no problemo since!
     
  18. Remo-99

    Remo-99 Member

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    Smitty, when I'm loading up bulk stuff, accuracy isn't 'the main' factor, quantity is (for me anyways).


    Snuffy, the simple & cheap Lee universal casemouth expander die, does the task well, in preventing the shaving of bullet material, rounding the mouths and flaring slightly to ease bullet starting/seating. IMO. All in one quick operation.

    Speaking of Spray N Pray shooting, I have loads of fun plinking large falling plates at close ranges with a compensated 1911, accuracy isn't as critical as time, where the objective is to knock all the plates down in the fastest possible time.

    Heck most of the time I ain't even aiming, just pointing and shooting. Using standard sights just burns up milli seconds, reflex optic sights are nice though.

    Practice is what gets those plates to fall, and 500rds in a single session is not unusual, hence quantity. Prayn' prolly would help too, or atleast take the focus away, when having an off day. lol.

    Ya got me all keen, now, to head out to the range and 'Brass up'.
     
  19. Kevwyo

    Kevwyo Member

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    Thanks for all the responses to my OP. As I looked through the brass I'd say about 1 or 2 out of every 10 were not round at the case mouth and definitely needed some sizing. I even had to throw one case out .... case was all jacked up.

    So now I am in the midst of resizing 500 5.56 brass cases which just adds a few more steps to the process .... :(.
     
  20. NCsmitty

    NCsmitty Member

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    Just treat it as a step to producing the best ammo that you can. It will pay off in a more consistent round and eliminate any question about case prep. Then all you need to concentrate on is the charge weight and bullet seating to the correct COL, to give the best accuracy.

    NCsmitty
     
  21. USSR

    USSR Member

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    +1. Just chamfer the necks and you are GTG. FL resizing new brass does nothing except open up the neck and resize it back down. The body of the brass is already smaller than a regular FL resizing die can produce.

    Don
     
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