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Old West Guns and Their Employers

Discussion in 'Blackpowder' started by XGibsonX, Jan 23, 2013.

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  1. XGibsonX

    XGibsonX Member

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    So here we go with the weaponry. . .

    Despite weak extreactors and whatever else, these bad boys were golden on that hot August day:

    11025895_1.jpg

    1860 Henry, used with deadly effectiveness by Colvin:

    800px-Henry_Rifle.jpg

    And the Winchester Model 1866 Carbine:

    9387383_1.jpg

    And let's not forget Zeke Colvin's1853 Enfield Pattern (Al's brother):

    [​IMG]

    From "Great Western Indian Fights" chapter by Appleman (merely for firearms data):

    hf11.jpg
    hf12.jpg
    hf13.jpg
     
  2. XGibsonX

    XGibsonX Member

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  3. XGibsonX

    XGibsonX Member

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    [Just an update. . . this forum is one of the few others I read. We have been slowly building, absolutely nothing like THR, more focused on the old west, bullet alloys, experimenters and meticulous craftsman.]

    http://www.wedealinlead.net/forum/index.php

    July 15, 1878 -July 19, 1878.

    A couple of images that are exceedingly important:

    mcsweenhouse.jpg

    btko.jpg

    Some bare bones backdrop. . . I am assuming most readers know something of thje Lincoln County War, from Mike Towers' Magazine article, Wild West, December 2004:

    " The Lincoln County War was a lawless episode in New Mexico history that is best remembered today for having triggered the legend of Billy the Kid. On April 1, 1878, during that bitter business feud, the Kid and other so-called Regulators killed Lincoln County Sheriff William Brady. New Mexico Territory Governor Lew Wallace never got around to giving Billy a pardon for killing Brady or for his other Lincoln County War escapades. After more than 120 years of media attention, interest in the Kid remains so high that the current governor of New Mexico has been considering giving Billy a posthumous pardon. But the Kid's story has been so romanticized that it has obscured the truth about the Lincoln County War."

    "An uncomplicated explanation of the Lincoln County War is that it was a feud involving two competing groups, termed "rings," intent on monopolizing trade, politics and vast stretches of land in New Mexico Territory. One ring, known as "the House," was a firmly entrenched local commercial empire, so named because most of its business dealings were conducted out of a store that resembled a house, and because the name appealed to the men operating its various nefarious enterprises. The House, besides holding a monopoly on domestic trade, often fulfilled beef contracts for the military through purchasing beef stolen by a band of outlaws known as "the boys," and used this gang as enforcers when necessary. By all accounts, the passel of Irishmen associated with the House--originally led by Lawrence G. Murphy--was as ruthless a band of brigands as ever existed in American commerce, as ready to terminate their detractors and competitors as they were to fleece customers."

    New Mexico Territorial Governor Axtell, soon after the siege was replaced by Lew "Ben Hur" Wallace:

    Samuel-Beach-Axtell-1876.jpg

    Enter Mr. John Tunstall as well as Alexander McSween. . . legendsofamerica. com:

    "In 1877 Alexander McSween, a lawyer, and John Tunstall, a wealthy 24-year old English cattleman and banker, set up a rival business called H.H. Tunstall & Company near the one owned by Dolan, Murphy and Riley.

    Supporting them was a large ranch owner named John Chisum, who owned more than 100,000 head of cattle.

    Furious at this development, Dolan attempted to goad Tunstall into a gunfight. However, Tunstall refused to use violence himself but soon recruited Billy the Kid, officially, as a "cattle guard.”

    In February, 1878, "The House” proprietors obtained a court order to seize some of Tunstall's horses as payment for an outstanding debt. When Tunstall refused to surrender the horses, Lincoln County Sheriff, William Brady, formed a posse led by deputy William Morton to seize them. After protesting the presence of the posse on his land, Tunstall was shot in the head on February 18, 1878. This incident started what became known as the Lincoln County War.

    Billy the Kid was deeply affected by the murder, claiming that Tunstall was one of the only men that treated him like he was "free-born and white." After Tunstall's funeral Billy swore: "I'll get every son-of-a-bitch who helped kill John if it's the last thing I do."

    20046472_118263258261.jpg

    20046472_122771808615.jpg

    Adding fuel to the fire, it was rumored that Tunstall had been murdered on the orders of James Dolan and Lawrence Murphy.

    However, Billy would not be able to immediately exact his revenge as he, along with Fred Waite, were briefly jailed by Sheriff William Brady. After he was released, Billy soon joined a posse led by Dick Brewer, Tunstall's Ranch Foreman, called the Regulators. The group's primary aim was to hunt for Tunstall's killer, William Morton.

    On March 6, 1878, the Regulators tracked Morton in the countryside near the Rio Peñasco. After a five mile running gunfight, Morton surrendered on the condition that his fellow deputy sheriff, Frank Baker, would be returned alive to Lincoln. However, on the third day of the journey back to Lincoln, on March 9th, Billy and another Regulator killed the prisoners, along with one of their fellow Regulators that had tried to stop them.

    Three weeks later Billy and several other Regulators holed up in Tunstall's store while Sheriff William Brady was searching for the killers of his deputies. They ambushed the sheriff and his men on April 1, 1878, killing Sheriff Brady and mortally wounding one of his deputies."

    There you have a quick and rough background for our 5 days of hell. . .

    Lincoln Counmty Courthouse 1930:

    lincoln%20county%20courthouse,%201930.jpg

    We will refer to the two sides as Regulators (the Tunstall-McSween faction), and the other as Murphy-Dolan faction (the Murphy-Dolan-Riley faction).
     
  4. XGibsonX

    XGibsonX Member

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    Late in the early Summer evening of Sunday April 14, 1878 McSween and the Regulators descend from their perch in the hills around Lincoln. They ride into the town and simply take over. They number upwards of 60 mean and they positions themselves strategically around the town.

    From an internet article, entitled "The Five-Day Battle":

    "The stage is set for the climatic battle of the Lincoln County War. Alex McSween has decided that the time has come for there to be one final showdown between his forces and Jimmy Dolan’s. One last test of strength and it will be determined which side will win Lincoln County. Shortly after nightfall on July 14, Alex McSween, tired of living in the hills and wanting to return to his home, and the Regulators rode into Lincoln and took over the town. McSween has no real battle plan, but he figures if he strikes first against the Dolan crowd and leaves it up to them to answer his challenge, his side will win. McSween and the Regulators do have several advantages over the Dolan men. First of all, after recently recruiting farmer Martin Chaves from Picacho and twenty-five or so Hispanics under his command, the Regulators now number about sixty, more than Dolan and Sheriff Peppin will be able to muster together. Secondly, the Regulators made it into Lincoln undetected and placed themselves in strategic locations throughout town. In the big, U-shaped McSween house are McSween himself, his wife Susan, Elizabeth Shield and her five children, Harvey Morris (a non-combatant tubercular law student who just happens to be in the McSween house studying law), and about six Regulators. To the immediate east, in the Tunstall store, are George Coe, Henry Brown, and “Tiger Sam” Smith, along with Dr. Taylor Ealy and his family and schoolteacher Susan Gates. Across the street in the Montano store are Martin Chaves, Fernando Herrera, Constable Atanacio Martinez, twenty to twenty-five more Hispanics, and Billy “the Kid“ Bonney. Next door in the Patron house are about four or five more Hispanic Regulators. In the Ellis house/store at the east end of town, are Josiah “Doc” Scurlock, John Middleton, Charlie Bowdre, Fred Waite, Frank Coe, John Scroggins, “Dirty Steve” Stephens, Dan Dedrick, and maybe eight more men. Although the Regulators took these locations without firing a single shot, they did manage to trap Dolan men (called “Murphs” by the Regulators) Deputy Jack Long, Jim McDaniels, Jim Reese, George “Roxy” Rose, Billy Mathews, Sam Perry, and a newcomer to the area known only as “the Dummy” in the torreon, located next-door to the Baca house and across the street from the Montano store. "

    The so-called "Dummy" is an odd bird. The man was labeled dummy because no one thought he could speak. However when lead began to fly he spoke aplenty. Strange but true.

    Tunstall-McSween Store:

    tunstall_store.jpg

    Montano Store:

    85512364.jpg
     
  5. XGibsonX

    XGibsonX Member

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    "The above photo was taken sometime around 1890, but shows Lincoln much as it would have looked during the war. Looking east, the House is the large building in the foreground. The Tunstall store is approximately in the middle of the photo, on the opposite side of the street as the House. The McSween house would have been located in the vacant lot neighboring the Tunstall store."

    lincolnwhole.jpg

    At first light Sheriff 'Dad' Peppin discovers what the regulators have done and sends out a rider for the posses of Murphy-Dolan men scouring the hills for the Regulators. Dad has a handful of men in town, six of which are trapped in the torrean he decides to wait for his posses of men under Buck Powell, John Kinney, and Marion Turner. It is dusk when these hell for leather, hard men amble toward the Wortley hotel. Appropriately a sever dust storm accompanies them. . . About half ornery and fully pissed off, they rein up at the hitching post just in front of the hotel and immediately pour a barrage of hot lead into the McSween house. Splintering window shutters and causing everyone to know hell had rolled in. (It was a volley of around 15 rounds, bluster, really.) These men were mostly sonsabitches and mercenaries. Don't have a lot of use for this rag tag bunch but they were without any doubt, killers.

    Stay tuned.
     
  6. XGibsonX

    XGibsonX Member

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  7. Steel Horse Rider

    Steel Horse Rider Member

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    I have a book about the Lincoln County War that was published by the University of Arizona Press that details the real story as accurately as possible given the passage of time, but as I recall the story closely parallels what you have posted. It is an interesting read if anyone cares to follow up. I can't recall the name right now but I will try to find the book and post the information later.
     
  8. XGibsonX

    XGibsonX Member

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    The Bisbee Massacre, December 8, 1883

    Thought you guys might be up for another tale from:

    http://www.wedealinlead.net/forum/index.php

    On Dec. 8, 1883, five heavily armed men rode into Bisbee, Arizona Territory, for the purpose of stealing the mine payroll from the Copper Queen Mine.

    Nine kinds of hell broke loose. . . You guys interested?

    Pretty brutal story, seriously, gruesome.

    Historic-Bisbee-012-201x300.jpg

    Bisbee 1909:

    Bisbee%20AZ,%201909-500.jpg

    Alright fellas, I told you this was a bloody scene. I believe that there were four laying dead plus an unborn child and at least one other seriously wounded. So we have five dead in the "massacre" (if I understand the way the accounts read, properly). In the following days six more meet their end as well.

    LOOK WHAT I DUG UP!

    "Bisbee daily review. (Bisbee, Ariz.) 1901-1971, November 26, 1911, SECTION TWO, Image 9

    This article was written ~27 years after the massacre.

    hbac.jpg
    fsyw.jpg
    m0kz.jpg
    yzlu.jpg
     
  9. XGibsonX

    XGibsonX Member

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  10. XGibsonX

    XGibsonX Member

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    December 8, 1883. It was evening when five Clifton cowboys rode stolidly into the town of Bisbee, Arizona, and, in this instance, hell did indeed follow with them.

    It was a cold late Fall evening, just past 7 pm, and then men wore heavy coats and MASKS. They spoke not a word as they rode their, by most accounts, very fine mounts up the gulch, past the Copper Queen smelter, and to the east end of Preston’s Lumberyard in Bisbee, Arizona Territory. The men were armed to the teeth! Each man had a pair of Colt's and a Winchester (probably 1873's model). These men meant business. 'Hard put and desperate men' seems a reasonable assessment from the subsequent events. They estimated the mines payroll to run at $7,000, a tidy sum for the era.

    Drawing by Bob Boze Bell editor of TrueWest Magazing:

    [​IMG]

    NYC Newspaper blurb from that December week in 1883:

    8wp6.jpg

    An article for the ruidosonews. com puts it much better than my above prose:

    "Late on the afternoon of Dec. 8, five hard-looking men rode slowly into Bisbee, their shadows long in the late afternoon sun beaming into the narrow canyon that is Bisbee. All five were armed to the teeth, carrying two pistols and a rifle each.

    Tethering their horses, the five grim-faced gunmen walked up the street to the Goldwater and Castaneda General Store. It was common knowledge that the payroll for the Copper Queen Mine was routinely brought to this store.

    Normally, the payroll was in the neighborhood of $7,000 - a pretty luxurious neighborhood for 1883. As luck - bad luck - would have it, the payroll had not yet arrived when the five bandits stepped up to the front of the store. Three of the men, Bill Delaney, Tex Howard and Dan Kelly, stepped into the store and drew their guns, commanding the owners of the store, as well as seven or eight customers, to remain calm and very still."

    Stay tuned, Pardners. . .
     
  11. XGibsonX

    XGibsonX Member

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    Bob Boze Bell truewestmagazine. com:

    [​IMG]
     
  12. XGibsonX

    XGibsonX Member

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    Bob Boze Bell:

    [​IMG]

    The five grim faced men, "Big Dan" Dowd, Omer W. "Red" Sample, Daniel "Yorkie" Kelly, James "Tex" Howard, and William E. Delaney, dismounted and split up, three going into the Goldwater-Castañeda store and two remaining outside to pin down any possible trouble.

    "Frontier Justice in the Wild West: Bungled, Bizarre and Fascinating Executions" By R. Michael Wilson


    5j0j.jpg
    12mp.jpg

    Note the subtle differences here in the truewestmagazine. com article "Bazing Bastards"

    "A Bisbee resident, James Krigbaum, hears the shooting, buckles on his gunbelt and heads downtown. On the way, he hears reports that bandits are holding up the store and shooting at anything that moves. Krigbaum slips down an alley and takes up a vantage point behind a rock wall. As he peers over, he sees two men, armed with rifles, firing at unseen adversaries. Krigbaum takes aim at the tallest gunman and fires, but he misses. His second shot merely grazes the outlaw’s coat. The outlaws return fire at Krigbaum’s position, and he ducks for cover.

    The doors of the Bon Ton Saloon swing open, and assayer John Tappiner and Joseph A. Bright, of Willcox, step out on the boardwalk. One outlaw barks at the two men, “You go back!”

    Bright runs up the street, but Tappiner defiantly declares, “I won’t.”

    A rifle slug rips into his forehead, and he drops in the street.

    Next to the Goldwater-Castañeda store is Joe May’s Saloon. A man named Howard steps out from its doors, and the outlaws gun him down as soon as he appears.

    D. Tom Smith, a deputy sheriff from the San Pedro River area, exits the Simas Restaurant and identifies himself as a lawman. “You’re the man we are lookin’ for,” one of the outlaws retorts. The gang’s rifle fire strikes the deputy twice; the second shot kills him.

    With three dead men lying on the street, the locals amazingly remain uncowed and keep coming. Annie Roberts, an expectant mother, exits her restaurant and is cut down. J.A. “Tex” Nolly, a Bisbee lumber dealer, is shot as he runs out of a nearby saloon.

    Inside the Goldwater-Castañeda store, the three robbers have lined up all the customers and employees and are ransacking counter drawers and shelves. In a bedroom at the rear of the store, Jose Castañeda is lying on the bed, feigning illness, in an attempt to protect the cash he has hidden beneath his pillow. His ploy fails. A robber bursts in, grabs Castañeda off the bed and takes the money.

    The outlaws force Joe Goldwater to open the safe. Expecting a large amount of cash for the mining payroll, they are crushed when they find only $600 in cash, a watch and a couple pieces of jewelry.

    The bandits take the loot and leave. As they mount their horses, several locals—including Krigbaum, two others and a deputy sheriff—fire down the gulch at the fleeing men. They escape, unscathed."

    So we have three accounts, the newspaper, the book, and the article. . . My take, and the hunt and capture, tomorrow.

    rjov.jpg
     
  13. XGibsonX

    XGibsonX Member

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    After the robbery and slaughter, a posse was quickly form and one John Heath (Heith) was chosen as a tracker. Not good for anyone involved, including Heath. Here is some information regarding the rewards offered. It is from truewest.ring. com, dig up by Doug Hocking:

    "From the Minutes of the County Board and the Book of Warrants:
    In December 1883, shortly after the Massacre the County Supervisors voted a reward of $2500 for arrest and conviction of the five to be issued at $500 for each of the five holdup men. (This argues strongly that there were only five robbers, not six).

    On February 28, 1884, the board issued warrants (authorizing the treasurer to pay) the following:
    JC. Ward, Sheriff, $500 for Kelly
    JC. Ward, $500 for Wm. Delaney
    AG. Hill, Deputy, $500 for Howard
    AG. Hill, $500 for OW. Sample
    WA. Daniels, Deputy, $500 for Dan Dowd

    The warrants were redeemed almost a year later with $40 in interest by Wells Fargo and Ben Williams. It appears that they paid the sheriff and deputies and had to wait a year to get paid by the county.

    Whether this was a separate and distinct reward from the $15,000 Parsons described, I don’t know. Subscription began at the same time the county voted on the reward in December. Parsons collected against subscription on behalf of the county treasurer five days before the payouts were made, that is, right after the trial. $500 per head seems a lot more reasonable than $3000. Perhaps Parsons memory in 1901 was faulty. If they took $7500 in subscriptions and were able to collect $3200, that sounds reasonable.

    Anyway, it seems a barber in Deming, an ex-girlfriend in Clifton, and two Rurales in Sonora got stiffed."

    So, back to Heath. . . he and another tracker are leading the posse BUT they constantly lead it in large circles. It does not take long for suspicion to grow around Heath. The lawmen soon catch on. Heath and his fellow tracker manage, eventually, to track the outlaws to Soldier's Hole, slightly north and east of Bisbee, but then lead the group back to Tombstone. Moments later six-shooters are yanked by the lawmen and Heath and his companion are arrested and charged with murder and robbery. The deputy clearly believed that they were involved and indeed it seems to be the case that John Heath was. His fellow tracker was exonerated.

    Heath took all of no time to begin naming names/ratting out his fellow filth. He named names and gave descriptions of the five cowboys. Flyers were circulated in the area and even below the border.
     
  14. XGibsonX

    XGibsonX Member

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    Store proprietor, Joseph Goldwater:

    [​IMG]

    "These two street views show the location of the Goldwater-Castañeda store (see the circles). Bisbee didn’t have a bank yet, so payroll money and valuables were often kept in the store’s safe. The outlaws were counting on a payroll of $7,000, but the Tombstone stage bringing the money was delayed. If the robbers had fled up the canyon, they would have run into the disabled stage and gotten the money!"

    [​IMG]

    alamogordonews. com, 05/22/2008 04:37:32 PM MDT

    "At first the posse that went in pursuit was unsuccessful, partially because of their "tracker" - a man named John Heath. When the frustrated posse returned to Bisbee, two local men - Billy Daniels and a man named Hatch - went out into the desert and found some evidence on their own.

    A clue

    When Daniels and Hatch arrived at the ranch of a man named Frank Buckle, the rancher had not yet heard of the tragedy. He did however, have an interesting tale to tell the two deputized citizens. He informed them that "five tough ones" had arrived at his ranch two or three days prior and bought some horses.

    He recalled that he had seen the quintet once before - in the company of John Heath.

    Of course, the deputies' ears pricked up at the mention of Heath's name, but before they could comment, the helpful Mr. Buckle continued, supplying them with the names of all the bandits: Dan Dowd, Omar "Red" Sample, Dan Kelly, Jack "Tex" Howard, and "a Delaney." Daniels and Hatch looked at each other. They had no earthly idea where to find the five desperadoes, but they knew exactly where they could lay their hands on John Heath.

    Heath's capture

    County Sheriff Bob Paul, along with Deputy Hatch, found Heath lounging in a saloon and closed in on him from two sides. Heath offered no resistance and was promptly dragged off to jail.

    There, the officers told a fib and informed Heath that they had already captured Dowd and Sample and the pair had implicated him. Heath bought it hook, line and sinker and promptly snitched on the entire group.

    Even with this confession, the lawmen knew that their job wasn't going to be easy. The moment the people of Bisbee discovered that one of the perpetrators - the mastermind, as it turned out - was in the calaboose they would instantly seize him and decorated the nearest tree - or any elevated position - with him.

    With this in mind, they quietly moved Heath from the Bisbee jail and transferred him to the more substantial jail at the county seat: Tombstone. Rewards were posted everywhere for the five gunmen. Something had to give, and it wasn't long before something did.

    Rewards of $1,500 per man were placed on the heads of the five men still at large. Sure enough, some of the stolen jewelry surfaced almost immediately at Clifton, Ariz., north of Bisbee. Two deputies, named Hovey and Hill, were informed of a man who had been spending money liberally at Clifton and when they approached him, it turned out to be Omar "Red" Sample, in the company of Jack Howard, another of the bandits.

    When the desperadoes were confronted, they elected to shoot it out. In the ensuing gun battle, Sample was wounded. Seeing his partner go down, Howard dropped his weapon and raised his hands. In short order, the two killers joined their associate, John Heath, in the Tombstone jail.

    After that, things got rather interesting, at least from a legal standpoint. Billy Daniels received word from Mexican friends south of the border that Dan Dowd was at Sabrinal, Mexico, where he had procured employment as a miner. Without the slightest legal authority, Daniels packed his gear and headed for the border. Billy Daniels was a saloon owner and now a deputy who had participated in the shootout in Bisbee and he felt a certain compulsion to see justice done, regardless of the legalities involved.

    Not long after, Daniels confronted Dowd in a mine bunkhouse and Dowd wisely chose not to shoot it out, possibly already aware of what had happened to his two comrades at Clifton.

    Daniels smuggled Dowd onto a freight train bound for El Paso. It was illegal, but it worked.

    That left only Dan Kelly and Bill Delaney.

    Dan Kelly and Bill Delaney

    Kelly was taken rather easily when he was surprised by deputies as he sat in a barber's chair in Deming.

    Delaney was a tad more difficult. Like Dowd, he had decided to take refuge in Old Mexico. Again, Billy Daniels was notified by his Mexican friends (apparently there were a lot of them) of Delaney's whereabouts, and once again he packed up and headed for the border.

    This time, however, it was a little more complicated. Delaney was already in jail in Mexico. Nevertheless, when the Mexican authorities heard about Delaney's transgressions, they allowed Daniels to simply walk away with the prisoner. Once again, Daniels slipped his prisoner onto a northbound freight.

    It took two months exactly, but on Feb. 8, 1884, all six perpetrators were securely - or so the lawmen thought - incarcerated in the Tombstone jail. The five gunmen all pled guilty, but Heath asked for, and received, a separate trial.

    Kelly, Howard, Delaney, Sample and Dowd were all found to be incredibly guilty and on Feb. 11 they were sentenced to hang. Ten days later, on Feb. 21, Heath was also found guilty, but of second degree murder and was sentenced to life imprisonment."

    [​IMG]
     
  15. XGibsonX

    XGibsonX Member

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    From a Cochise County newspaper article, dated March 29, 1884.

    "March 29, 1884
    The Gallows Eight men legally put to death, Five Murderers Suspended from One Beam at Tombstone Arizona A Riot as a side show.
    O.W. Sample, Dan Dowd, James Delany, James Howard and Dan Kelly were hanged here at quarter past one this afternoon, for the Bisbee Murders.
    The five bandits marched up the steps of the scaffold without flinching, and all declared their innocence. Heith, who was lynched here on February 22, was, they stated also innocent. They bade their friends goodbye. They expressed faith in the Christian religion, and requested that their bodies be delivered to Father Gallagher. Nothing occurred to mar the sheriff's plans. The murderers were all dropped off together, and, with the exception of Dowd, died without a struggle.
    A SIDE SHOW
    Over one thousand persons witnessed the execution. A large balcony had been erected outside of and overlooking the jail yard, the builder intending to charge a dollar and a half admission. The mob became indignant and tore the balcony down. In the row which followed seven persons were injured. One man had his leg broken and another his arm. The balcony would have seated five hundred persons. With this exception, everything passed off quietly.
    THE RAID ON BISBEE
    The residents of Tombstone were startled on the morning of the 9th of last December by the news that reached the city regarding the desperate work of a number of bandits, who had on the previous day entered Bisbee, a neighboring mining settlement, and robbed a number of citizens. The messengers who brought the news stated that on the afternoon of December 8 six men rode into the settlement. They dismounted in a quiet part of the place, and , leaving the horses in charge of one of their number, five visited the business portion of the settlement and commenced a series of robberies. Three of them entered the store of A.A, Castenado while two stood guard without. As they entered the door one of them immediately covered the book-keeper of the establishment with a revolver and commanded him to open the safe, which he did. They took from the safe about $800.00 and then robbed the attaches taking a gold watch and other valuables. Whole these scenes were being acted within, the watchmen on the outside when any one approached, cried out "Keep back, or we will kill you." and pointed a revolver at the head of the person so addressed. When they left the plundered store, they returned to their horses, stopping and robbing several citizens on the way.
    A number of people were soon in pursuit of the desperadoes, who, as they rode from the place, fatally shot Mrs. Roberts, D.T. Smith, J.A. Tappenier, and John A. Nolly. The highwaymen made their escape, carrying with them about $1200.00. A reward of $2000.00 was offered for the arrest and conviction of the persons implicated in the crimes. As the desperadoes, with one exception, all wore masks, it was at first difficult to trace them. Clues soon developed that led to the arrest of six men. These were Daniel Dowd, James "alias "Tex" Delaney, Oscar W. Sample alias "Red" Daniel Kelly, James Howard and John Heith. The first five named men were tried at Tombstone and convicted of murder in the first degree. The trial of Heith was separate, and he was found guilty of murder in the second degree, and sentenced to life imprisonment.
    As Heith was believed to be the instigator of the crime, this so enraged the citizens of Tombstone that they determined to lynch him. On the morning of Washington's birthday about one hundred men, mostly miners armed themselves and a committee of seven appointed to enter the jail and secure the murderer.
    They knocked at the door, and as it was about the time that the Chinese servant brought in the breakfast for the prisoners, the jailer, thinking it was he, threw open the door, and the lynches marched in, and, under the muzzle of a revolver, they compelled the turnkey to open Heith's cell. This was done, and after putting the rope around Heith's neck, they started to leave jail with him. As they descended the stairs of the jail it was suggested that they hang him from the balustrade, but as Sheriff Ward and several others came on the scene, it was prevented. The sheriff was knocked down by some of the mob, who then dragged Heith through the streets for several blocks, until a telegraph pole was reached. He was then informed that his time had come. He made one request of the mob before he was lynched saying "Don't riddle my body with bullets, boys" A pocket handkerchief was put over his eyes and the rope thrown over one of the cross pieces of the telegraph pole. The mob, seizing the rope, drew him up, and he was left hanging for half an hour, when he was cut down."

    John Heath:

    3904040_orig.jpg

    [​IMG]

    images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTc7LmN0gGq0uOaDkoNZ4bk3mHgekDs4Co4H_zJX3Dj1Ibe72MD.jpg

    FINIS.
     
  16. XGibsonX

    XGibsonX Member

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  17. Patocazador

    Patocazador Member

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    I wish we had swift justice like that today. Good story, thanks.
     
  18. XGibsonX

    XGibsonX Member

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    Thank you, Bob!
     
  19. Crawdad1

    Crawdad1 Member

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    Great info Gibs!!! I Love to read and reread your posts almost daily. They're packed with so much information that everytime you read them you find out even more.
    Good stuff!!!
     
  20. XGibsonX

    XGibsonX Member

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    Crawdad1:

    Very kind of you. I am obliged to you for the post.

    :)
     
  21. sail32

    sail32 Member

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    Interesting web site but too dark to read properly on my computer.
     
  22. XGibsonX

    XGibsonX Member

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    That's why it has 3 different styles.
     
  23. XGibsonX

    XGibsonX Member

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    FROM MY SITE: http://www.wedealinlead.net/forum/index.php

    John Bull the English born gunman who killed Langford "Farmer" Peel, in Helena M.T. in 1867, among other things, will be the subject of our next sketch.

    This will be a bare bones account as there is not a lot of ready material on the internet.

    Check back. . .

    A facsimile of original head marker for Peel:

    91279421_133902609127.jpg
     
  24. XGibsonX

    XGibsonX Member

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    John Edwin Bull first saw light in the year of our Lord, 1836, in England. Whatever went with his first 24 years of his life is not known. The date he relocated to the American West in also a mystery. However, at the age of 25 years he was firmly planted here and had been for a long while. He was a boom camp veteran and when the rush for Elk Creek Basin broke, he was slap in the middle of it. Off he went hell-for-leather.

    What kind of man was he? Well, this early story related in miner James Stuart's contemporary journal and backed by legendary pioneers Granville Stuart and N.P. Langford, gives some insight. . . HE WAS A GUNMAN. The event occurred on August 25, 1862, at the Gold Creek mining camp in Montana Territory.

    On a warm late August evening a man with dark eyes and a coal black beard ambled into the camp. He dismounted carrying a double-barreled cannon, Colt's Navy six-shooter strapped on his side. All business, all day. He had with him a man named Fox; he immediately told the miners who that they were looking for. They wee on the trail of horse thieves. These were not ordinary horses but were extremely valuable animals and had been filched in Elk City, Idaho. The miners were given descriptions.

    [Elk City, Idaho. . . "They found gold near the confluence of the American and Red rivers. Further prospecting discovered more and more “color.” By mid-June they had slapped together a log cabin to serve as a recorder's office, in which “Captain” L. B. Monson recorded the first claim on June 14, 1861.

    Some men returned to Orofino for supplies and the new rush began, somewhat dampened by worries about the Indians. However, as more and more prospectors struck pay dirt, the rush swelled. That finally led to the founding of Elk City.

    By the following summer, the town had four to six stores of various kinds, five saloons, and two decent hotels. Because of its location deep in the mountains, heavy winter snow shut down work on almost every claim. By the fall of 1862, a quickly-established Express company had shipped out over $900 thousand in gold dust (over $50 million at today’s prices).

    Gold discoveries in easier country in Montana drew many prospectors away from Elk City the next year. However, in 1864 and 1865, determined gold-seekers built ditches and flumes to begin large-scale hydraulic mining. Thus, the value of metal extracted from the region actually increased. A sawmill built to supply lumber for these flumes did a booming business."] :

    ElkCity1901.jpg

    Elk City, Idaho:

    ElkCity.jpg

    Quickly they related that three men fitting the descriptions given had arrived in the camp some days earlier. They were running a Spanish monte game in a tent saloon.
     
  25. XGibsonX

    XGibsonX Member

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    The men showed up with in camp with six fine horses in tow and it was pretty clear to miners and manhunters alike that these were they guys. Their names were: C.W. Spillman, William Arnett, and B.D. Jermagin. Two of them would shortly see God.

    John Bull obtained from the miners the location of the tent saloon occupied by the three and along with Fox and a few od the miners went to procure the men. Spillman was snatched up easily along the route to the saloon and gave no resistance, he was know around camp as a "rather quiet, reserved, pleasant young man", so says miner James Stuart in his contemporary diary. Bull, Fox Stuart and the small group of other miners made straight for the tent saloon with Bull leading the way, shotgun in his arm and Colt's on his ready, ready to roll.

    They found Arnett and Jermagin working their monte fame, as expected. According to Stuart, "Arnett was dealing and Jermagin was 'lookout' for him". John Bull plowed right into the place, brought his scattergun into dealing position and ordered the men to "throw up their hands!". Arnett kept a loaded, cocked, and primed, Colt's Navy on his lap when dealing and thought to stop Bull before he got started. Error in judgement. He quickly snatched his Colt's into play but he was a day late and a dollar short, Bull threw down on him with his shotgun right through front chest. He hit the ground dead as a doornail. Third man was then looking down the other barrel of Bull's death machine. . . he declined to clear leather. He, immediately, surrendered. He was tied up with Spillman for the night and in the morning the miners buried Arnett, WITH HIS SIX-SHOTER IN ONE HAND AND CARDS IN THE OTHER AS THEY COULD NOT GET HIS GRIP UNCLENCHED ! Jermagin and Spillman went on trial immediately. In a matter of a couple of hours, Jermagin convinced the miners that he innocently threw in with the thieves on the trail, evidently a while after they had stolen the horses. He was let go and banished. Spillman was not so fortunate. He was convicted in a few minutes, sentenced to death, and hanged less than an hour later.

    John Bull reloaded and left. . .

    Gold Creek, M.T.:

    5950472430_a5113b4561_z.png

    Line Rd. Gold Creek, Montana:

    [​IMG]

    Thus begins the story of a DEADLY gunman of the "American Old West", so far as we have record of. We will focus mostly on his gunfight with another LEGENDARY gunman of the old west known as Langford "Farmer" Peel". Interestingly enough, "Farmer" Peel was also an Englishman.

    John Bull was never a miner but spent decades following the mining camps. He did so in furtherance of his true profession, that of professional gambler. One other incident concerning Bull in these early years is related now and then we will adjourn until tomorrow.

    Fast forward to 1864. . .

    "At this time mining camps in Nevada Territory were booming, most promionent Aurora, and then Austin. John Bull settled at the silver camp of Austin, in the center of the Territory. Early in 1864 there came about a nationalistic dispute over who was “chief” in Austin - Irish vs. English. In deference to the late editorial against dueling with pistols and knives, the use of those weapons was rejected by involved parties. It so happened another talent of Johnny Bull was fisticuffs. The issue was finally settled between Bull and a particular Irishman. They met up late at night on February 21, in a saloon at the corner of Main and Cedar Streets. Inside within the presence of an excited crowd, the two combatants (with their seconds) came to an agreement in regards the rules of pugilism to be allowed:

    They thereupon adjourned to the street. Mac Waterhouse was selected by the Englishman as his second, and George Loney by the Irishman, and after these preliminaries had been gone through with, the mauling commenced about twelve o’clock. Twenty-one rounds were fought and for a time the battle was very hotly contested, both giving and receiving very hard knocks and showing no signs of yielding. But Johnny Bull’s endurance was too much for Irish grit, and the victory was decided in favor of the Englishman. It is claimed however, that the result was entirely owing to the instructions Mac gave his man during the twenty-first round; that is, to feint with his left, take one step back, and give an uppercut with his right. This direction was followed and gained the fight. Both men were severely punished. A large crowd witnessed the contest, many being present in dishabille [state of casual attire], not having time to dress themselves when they jumped out of bed to see what was going on. We are making fine progress in “muscular Christianity.” A prize fight in our public thoroughfare. Who can beat it?At this time mining camps in Nevada Territory were booming, most promionent Aurora, and then Austin. John Bull settled at the silver camp of Austin, in the center of the Territory. Early in 1864 there came about a nationalistic dispute over who was “chief” in Austin - Irish vs. English. In deference to the late editorial against dueling with pistols and knives, the use of those weapons was rejected by involved parties. It so happened another talent of Johnny Bull was fisticuffs. The issue was finally settled between Bull and a particular Irishman. They met up late at night on February 21, in a saloon at the corner of Main and Cedar Streets. Inside within the presence of an excited crowd, the two combatants (with their seconds) came to an agreement in regards the rules of pugilism to be allowed." That according to wikipedia.

    The epic fight was detailed thoroughly by the Reese River Reveille, Feb. 23, 1864:


    "They thereupon adjourned to the street. Mac Waterhouse was selected by the Englishman as his second, and George Loney by the Irishman, and after these preliminaries had been gone through with, the mauling commenced about twelve o’clock. Twenty-one rounds were fought and for a time the battle was very hotly contested, both giving and receiving very hard knocks and showing no signs of yielding. But Johnny Bull’s endurance was too much for Irish grit, and the victory was decided in favor of the Englishman. It is claimed however, that the result was entirely owing to the instructions Mac gave his man during the twenty-first round; that is, to feint with his left, take one step back, and give an uppercut with his right. This direction was followed and gained the fight. Both men were severely punished. A large crowd witnessed the contest, many being present in dishabille [state of casual attire], not having time to dress themselves when they jumped out of bed to see what was going on. We are making fine progress in “muscular Christianity.” A prize fight in our public thoroughfare. Who can beat it?"
     
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