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Practicality of a Lanyard

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by CWL, Jan 23, 2008.

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  1. CWL

    CWL Member

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    Y'all,

    Does anyone regularly use a lanyard for his sidearm? Except for Brittish Leftennants about to receive a Zulu charge, are there any practical needs for them anymore?

    Given the fact that I own several pistols with lanyard holes, I finally made the effort and bought one.

    Attached to pistol and my belt, it did not affect my draw in any way, nor did it affect my ability to change magazines. I did however, feel stupid to have one more thing attached to me.
     
  2. rero360

    rero360 Member

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    we were required to use them when I was over in Iraq, but given the types of individuals we had in the company (only a select few, but lord were they incompitent) it was probably a good idea. I had my pistol in a chest rig, tactical talior, and I found it would catch on stuff every now and then but I never cared if it broke, kind of hoped it would so i wouldn't have to use it any more.
     
  3. Glockman17366

    Glockman17366 Member

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    In the true chaos of a gunfight, when your body takes over and your thinking may not be as clear as it should be; you might appreciate having your pistol on a lanyard.
     
  4. Blacksmoke

    Blacksmoke Member

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    Oh, I don't know, a braided lanyard in gold attached to the but of a Royal Blue Colt Python with a 6 inch barrel and carried in a flap holster would make quite an impression. You would cut a handsome figure strolling through the mall;).

    It is not a bad idea for a nightwatchman or a security guard in a public place (a simple lanyard, not something out of "The Student Prince"). These people are less likely to be involved in a hand-to-hand scuffle with a perp who could grab the lanyard or a necktie and use it to his advantage. I could see a Harbor Master or Harbor Patrolman using a lanyard. If he dropped his weapon, it might never be seen again.
     
  5. The Lone Haranguer

    The Lone Haranguer Member

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    It is better to have a lanyard attachment and not need it, than need it and not have it. I am not sure what need I have, but I think a lanyard would be a benefit to a mounted or motorcycle police officer.
     
  6. takhtakaal

    takhtakaal Member

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    Sometimes we find ourselves rolling around trying to stay in a fight that hasn't gotten to guns yet, or we find ourselves suddenly in a strange position that may or may not have us halfway upside down. The advantage of a lanyard is that the pistol is never further away than its length.
     
  7. TimM

    TimM Member

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    Ok, I am gonna ask another dumb question. What is the proper way to use a lanyard? Does anyone have photos?
     
  8. Glockamania®

    Glockamania® Member

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    For military, a necessity for combat factors.

    For a civie, a cool factor.
     
  9. Vern Humphrey

    Vern Humphrey Member

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    The lanyard loop goes over the head, so the cord passes over the left shoulder and under the right arm. To put it around your neck invites someone to strangle you.

    Lanyards were essential on horseback, and pretty critical for parachute operations.
     
  10. junyo

    junyo Member

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    Mossy rock, rotten log, a quick slip, head over tea kettle down a slope, strewing personal effects down a hill, face to face with a pissed off critter at the bottom. Canoe tipped over, supplies headed for the bottom, three day walk back to civilization.

    Lanyard would be real handy two seconds after either. I never thought of a lanyard for modern combat, but consider it essential for the woods.
     
  11. TimM

    TimM Member

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    Stupid question #2. How would this work with a concealed weapon or would it?
     
  12. Bones11b

    Bones11b Member

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    I used to think lanyards were silly. Then I went days on end with little or no rest and realized were it not for lanyards I would have lost most of the equipment that I depended on. Not to mention going head over heels down a mud slide in the jungle. Capsizing a zodiac in the ocean. Sliding on my butt down an ice covered slope. Wrestling a person into submission. As for how best to utilize a lanyard I tie mine just long enough so my gear doesn't hit the ground.
     
  13. average_shooter

    average_shooter Member

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    Most of the modern lanyards I've seen don't go over the head or anything, they just attach to the belt. For CCW it might work, if you feel it is necessary. Some lanyards are not much more than a length of paracord, others have "bungie"-like material in them so they act like a telephone cord, they coil up when at rest but allow for full extension when needed.
     
  14. DoubleTapDrew

    DoubleTapDrew Member

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    You loop one end through the lanyard hole and the other end to your wallet. It adds to the "OMG!" factor if you lose your sidearm :neener:
     
  15. peyton

    peyton Member

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    As the Platoon Sergeant, I had the "Pleasure" of training new Lieutenants. One of the first things taught is when the pistol is checked out of the arms room, the lanyard is attached to the pistol and then to them. Rifles are easier to find if "Left Behind" or forgotten during a field exercise, Pistols are almost impossible to retrieve. Not wanting to have an embarrassed new leader, I explained that weapon and personnel accountability was the Platoon Leaders number one job. NOT said is everyone would try to take the pistol if unattended in order to make the new LT look like a dummy. In the sandbox here, I see a wide variety of pistol retention straps.
     
  16. 1911Tuner

    1911Tuner Moderator Emeritus

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    All my carry pistols have lanyard loops, even though I rarely have need for a lanyard these days...since I gave up trampin' through the bush and 4-wheelin' and such. They're all still there. They don't weigh much, and they don't eat, so why not. I used a lanyard on a 4-wheeler even with the gun in a flapped holster. Overkill...but there it is.

    My method was to use a length of parachute cord, long enough to bring the pistol to eye level in both hands, and just tuck the excess length into my pants, right behind or under the holster...between holster and belt.

    Another good method is to carry a Commander in a military flapped holster with the lanyard coiled up and tucked into the bottom to take up the space left by the shorter slide.
     
  17. Joe Demko

    Joe Demko Member

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    I like lanyards. The first one I ever used was the surplus leather one that came with my Makarov. I liked it so much I started using "field expedient" lanyards on my other pieces that have loops.
    My wife is from Ukraine and grew up there during the Soviet-era. According to her lanyards are for "when moscali is drunk and drop pistolet, he not lose."
     
  18. wheelgunslinger

    wheelgunslinger Member

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    I use one for hiking and backpacking. It's only a foot or two of paracord.

    I don't do any tactical responses to anything, so I suppose that's all I need it for.

    Though, this thread does have me thinking about a wrist lanyard for a nightstand weapon.
     
  19. novaDAK

    novaDAK Member

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    If I were on a ship, a harbor, on a bridge, rock climbing, on a moving train, shooting from a car, shooting on a roof, etc., I would want a lanyard.

    I highly doubt I'd ever be doing any of the above, but I wouldn't mind if my gun had an attachment point on it just to be prepared :)
     
  20. Onmilo

    Onmilo Member

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    I use my lanyards when my buddy and I get in a canoe or flatbottom boat and go floating around his lake and the ajacent part of a certain river where asian flying carp are particularly abundent.
    I won't admit what we do with the pistols but the lanyards are a great added safety feature that keeps the guns from going into the drink.
    P.S. I like CCI shotshells. :)
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  21. AK103K

    AK103K Member

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    This is pretty much the way I do it too.

    Pretty much any pistol I carry has a lanyard loop of some sort, or I rig one if possible

    Anyone who canoes or kayaks, and especially on a river, knows their value. It will amaze you what the river will remove from your "secure" pockets.


    Onmilo,

    Those British 58 web holsters are one of the best all around field holsters going. They are cheap, very well made, easily adapted to many different uses, and provide great protection. They work well with a number of different pistols too, and not just the HP.
     
  22. El Tejon

    El Tejon Member

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    With a pistol, depends on what I'm doing. Unlike most THR members, I do not regularly jump out of helicopters and dispatch tangos with swift Judo chops, thus I do not use them.

    I think for canoeing or backpacking (or jumping out of helicopters or tooling around on SF tinkertoy cars), the use of a lanyard makes a lot of sense to me.

    I prefer to use a lanyard on a flashlight.
     
  23. Bwana John

    Bwana John Member

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    While I have a lanyard loop on my 1911, it does get in the way of putting a mag in, if the mag doesent have a bumper on the bottom.

    With the bumper no problem, but without a bumper it kinda hurts the heal of the hand while seating the mag.
     
  24. 1911Tuner

    1911Tuner Moderator Emeritus

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    Don't place the heel of your hand so far to the rear. Once ya practice it a little, you can slam one in and never touch the loop.
     
  25. ceetee

    ceetee Member

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    Dang... we gotta get El T up to speed!:neener:

    That said, the only time I've ever been armed and felt in danger of losing my CCW was on a lengthy (five-day) canoe trip. I though of rigging up something, but instead, just wound up stuffing it into a large (not made for CCW) fanny pack, and calling it good. Maybe the gods smiled upon me that trip, but it WAS good!
     
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