Quantcast
  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Pros and cons of bluing

Discussion in 'Blackpowder' started by Snaggletooth, Mar 31, 2012.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Snaggletooth

    Snaggletooth Member

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2006
    Messages:
    381
    Location:
    Missouri Ozarks
    Im trying to find whis the better of bluing or Parkerizing. Ive used paste with some success. I want to do a double barrel. Would a plastic container work for the parkerizing, Im sure someone has used both methods.
     
  2. Jaymo

    Jaymo Member

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2010
    Messages:
    3,530
    Parkerizing requires less heat than hot bluing.
    Parkerizing is much better for rust prevention, PROVIDED you oil it. The phosphate coating that is parkerizing is not what prevents rust.
    Parkerizing absorbs and holds oil, which prevents rusting. That's why it's used for military guns.
    That, and it's easier to do well, and doesn't require polishing beforehand.

    Parkerizing is one of my favorite finishes, because it holds oil so well.

    High polish bluing, like Colt's Royal Blue, is gorgeous.
    Parkerizing is more practical.

    Parkerizing can be done on a kitchen stove.
    Hot bluing requires about 285-315 degrees Fahrenheit.
     
  3. martysport

    martysport Member

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2011
    Messages:
    68
    Location:
    Frogland

    So can hot bluing :)

    I've re-blued an 1860 barrel and cylinder along with an 1858 cylinder and Marlin 25N bolt :cool:
     
  4. 4v50 Gary

    4v50 Gary Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2002
    Messages:
    18,930
    I think parkerizing is a more durable finish. Polished Blue is prettier.
     
  5. jimmyraythomason

    jimmyraythomason Member

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2006
    Messages:
    7,416
    Location:
    Alabama
    It CAN be but it isn't a very good idea. I've done hot salt bluing since the late 1970s and I can assure you that this is not something you want to do in your house.
     
  6. Snaggletooth

    Snaggletooth Member

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2006
    Messages:
    381
    Location:
    Missouri Ozarks
    Thanks for the infornation.. Ive got one project gun and may have another. One is a 12 ga. shotgun from a kit that was advertised as "new, out of the box, never been fiter." It should have read, never been finished. Oh well, live and learn
     
  7. Nappers

    Nappers Member

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2011
    Messages:
    236
    Location:
    Yreka, CA
    I prefer browning, the shiny of a muzzleloader barrel plays games with my eyes and the browning I can see the sights just wonderful (with my prescrip glasses mind you!)
     
  8. CraigC
    • Contributing Member

    CraigC Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2006
    Messages:
    15,267
    Location:
    West Tennessee
    As stated, contrary to popular misconception, parkerizing is not more corrosion resistant than bluing all by itself. Its claim to fame is that it holds oil, a lot of it.
     
  9. BCRider

    BCRider Member

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2008
    Messages:
    7,772
    Location:
    Pacific North"Wet" Coast of Canada
    Parkerizing is more for modern stuff. Also I find that while it's quite durable for protecting the underlying metal it DOES mark easily so the surface soon has a random scuffed look from all the burnish marks.

    For my firearms which I want to enjoy looking at I far and away prefer a lovely moderate sheen blueing or browning. Far more traditional in the old world sense. But if I were out for a WWII military like 1911 or something of that sort it woud be parkerized all the way.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page