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question about combining powders

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by raddiver, Jul 6, 2011.

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  1. raddiver

    raddiver Member

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    So I've gone though most of my first jug of Bullseye.
    I picked up another jug of BE last night.
    Is it safe to pour whats left of the old BE in with the new BE to consolidate space or should i leave them separate?
     
  2. USSR

    USSR Member

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    Yep, no problem. Not enough variance between lot-to-lot cannister grades of powder to worry about.

    Don
     
  3. ReloaderFred

    ReloaderFred Member

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    Just mix and shake and you're good to go. Bullseye is one of the oldest and most consistant of the smokeless powders, and there's no danger in mixing lots.

    Hope this helps.

    Fred
     
  4. raddiver

    raddiver Member

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    I thought that i had read something like that before. But obviously i wanted to make sure, before i actually did it and took the chance on blowing myself up. :)

    Thanks for the confirmation.
     
  5. MtnCreek

    MtnCreek Member

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    Does everyone here re-work their loads when changing from one can of powder to the next?
    Let's say you're loading .223 on a progressive; if using 1 lb cans of powder, you would re-work a load two to three times per hr.
    Loading .308 with 4 lb cans, you would re-work once per hr.
     
  6. billybob44

    billybob44 Member

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    Each to his own, but I just add to the powder measure+keep on trucking..Bill.
     
  7. ReloaderFred

    ReloaderFred Member

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    I've been reloading since 1963 and currently load for 31 different calibers. In all that time, I've only had one lot of powder that required reworking a load. That was one lot of Winchester 748 that I purchased around 1979 or so. In that case, I had to drop the powder charge one full grain for a .223 load, since the new lot showed pressure signs that the old lots didn't. Once I reworked the charge, the accuracy returned and the pressure signs disappeared. In fact, I still have a target that has 5 rounds into 5/8" at 200 yards with that load from my Remington 700 BDL Varminter. The amazing part is that group was fired with bullets I had pulled from rounds that had exhibited pressure signs and reloaded over the new powder charge.

    I buy most of my powders in 8 pound kegs, and full case lots of 32 pounds when I can. This helps me to know that all the powder of one type will be consistant within that lot.

    Canister powders are blended for burning rates, within fairly strict parameters, just like fine blended whiskey. If the final product varies much, the consumer will know right away...

    Hope this helps.

    Fred
     
  8. Clark

    Clark Member

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    How did you determine that the effort was not required?
    Stain gauge?
    Same velocity?
    Threshold of brass sticky?
    Threshold of loose primer pockets?
    Threshold of sticky bolt lift?
    Primers looked happy?

    Have you quantified how well the different lots match?
    I am going to guess 1%.
     
  9. ReloaderFred

    ReloaderFred Member

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    Chronographs weren't common in 1979, nor affordable, so I couldn't tell what the velocity was on the loads in question. I determined there was a problem from sticky bolt opening, a measurable difference in the expansion of the case just above the web, and a marked difference in accuracy. Once I worked the load up again to the same accuracy level as the older batches of that powder, I was exactly one grain below the other loads. Since the original load was 25.5 grains of powder, and the errant lot ended up at 24.5 grains, the percentage was enough to make me sit up and take notice. And yes, the primers "weren't happy".

    It's much easier now to develop loads, since chronographs are quite affordable and common. I personally own the PACT Professional Chronograph, with printer, and find it a valuable tool.

    Hope this helps.

    Fred
     
  10. brickeyee

    brickeyee Member

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    If your loads are well off maximum the variation from lot to lot of canister powders should not be significant.

    If you have loads near max you need to back off and work up again for different lots.

    Non-canister grade powders have significant variation from lot to lot.
     
  11. Arkansas Paul

    Arkansas Paul Member

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    I'm with Fred. Just pour and give it a shake and you're good to go.
     
  12. x_wrench

    x_wrench Member

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    i do it all the time. actually, i try to time my purchases so there is about 1/4 of a bottle left so i can combine them. that way IF there is a slight variation between lots, i can make it even a little less different.
     
  13. kingmt

    kingmt Member

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    What makes you think your getting it blended? It is hard to mix two dry substances. It should be tumbled instead of shaken. You are probably ending up with 3 of lot A 3 of B 5 of A 10 of B so on.....

    However I do it all the time.
     
  14. Rollis R. Karvellis

    Rollis R. Karvellis Member

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    Are you claiming that a wood, and blue rifle was able to shoot groups smaller then a foot. Balderdash!
     
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