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seeking advice

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by Agent P, Aug 16, 2005.

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  1. Agent P

    Agent P Member

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    I'm new to the world of guns, and I was curious as to what you experienced folks would tell yourselves if you could go back to when you were a newbie. What is something important you wished you knew from the get-go? Thanks.
     
  2. pax

    pax Member

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    I wish I'd had the money to buy a .22 and a defense gun in a bigger caliber. As it was, I bought my defense gun (9mm) and learned on it, but I think I would have been a better shooter, sooner, if I'd started on a .22.

    One thing I did right: I started taking classes right away. Yeah, they cost money. And yeah, it's embarrassing to be the newest shooter in the class. But they save you soooo much time, effort, and aggravation -- not to mention avoiding bad habits from the beginning -- that good classes are absolutely worth it for a beginner.

    pax
     
  3. ZenMasterJG

    ZenMasterJG Member

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    Hey Agent P!
    My advice:
    Figure out what you want to shoot. Pistol, rifle, shotgun, blunderbuss, whatever.
    Poke around and find a good deal on somthing. If your shooting pistol, i'd start with a .22 or 9mm or thereabouts (great deals available, not too expensive ammo), picking up a .45 is a sure way to develop a flinch (and empty your bank account QUICK)

    Pick somthing that feels good in your hands. I feel in love with the 1911 platform the first time i handled one... it just felt *RIGHT* Same with my Browing Auto-5 shotgun.

    Next:
    Step 1) Buy ammo.
    Step 2) Use up.
    Step 3) Repeat.
    (BA/UU/R :D You'll probably see it frequently 'round here.)

    Simple, right? :)
    Addictive as heck too.

    Welcome to the sport!
    (Oh, guns have a nasty habit of reproducing while your not looking. Be prepared :evil: )
     
  4. Standing Wolf

    Standing Wolf Member in memoriam

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    I've always wished I had sense enough to buy more high end guns in my youth, when they were more plentiful and affordable, although I didn't have a great deal of money then. They High Standards and Pythons I buy today generally need a fair amount of work. If I'd bought them decades ago, they'd still be in tip-top shape.
     
  5. jefnvk

    jefnvk Member

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    .22's are great beginner guns. Sure, bigger guns are fun for making more noise and bigger holes, but after 10 years of hunting/shooting and a year or two of more intensive target shooting, I find myself buying .22's to fill all the holes where my collection should have started.

    That, and milsurp guns can be a great deal. The Swiss K31 is a great gun, and can be had under $100.
     
  6. ID_shooting

    ID_shooting Member

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    I have go with the "get a .22" camp as well. after shooting for over 20 years, my most used guns are my single-six and my 10/22
     
  7. taliv

    taliv Moderator

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    i would have started competing years earlier. most of the guys on the HP line are old and can't see anymore. they all complain about how they wish they'd started shooting HP in their youth.
     
  8. JohnKSa

    JohnKSa Member

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    1. Don't sell a gun unless you're absolutely certain you don't want it.

    2. Don't be seduced by low price. Save a little longer and get what you REALLY want.

    3. Spend a little more time researching accessories before buying.

    4. Never buy a gun just because it's cheap.

    5. Shoot more.
     
  9. Telperion

    Telperion Member

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    "Don't take that job in California" :uhoh:
     
  10. SASS#23149

    SASS#23149 Member

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    there are good guns,and cheap guns,but the two very seldom go together.Buy a few good guns instead of a bunch of 'pawn shop' junkers that 'could be fixed up/spruced up',etc.
     
  11. CARRY'IN

    CARRY'IN member

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    The most fun I ever had with a gun is bunnywabbits with a .22 pistol. Loved every minute of it, every bowl of rabbit chili. I also hunted ptarmigan but that was in Alaska and I am told shooting birds on the ground with a pistol is just not done in the lower 48. If I had it to do over again I would have hunted those snow bunnies with a .36 navy cap and ball pistol. I would always shoot them in the neck anyway so the .36 would work. Get as far away from everyone as you can, alone. Enjoy.
     
  12. ID_shooting

    ID_shooting Member

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    "I am told shooting birds on the ground with a pistol is just not done in the lower 48."

    Grouse, but that is it.
     
  13. 22-rimfire

    22-rimfire Member

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    (1) Shoot with someone who has some experience at first. (2) Learn the safety rules for handling firearms. (3) Buy a good 22 revolver or auto pistol to learn how to shoot. (4) Learn how to disassembe auto pistols like the 1911 if you buy one. (5) Don't buy a lot of things like holsters unless you intend to carry out in the woods or carry concealed. I have wasted a lot of money on good holsters just to let them gather dust. (5) Buy only quality firearms. Don't be too influenced by price although the Ruger 22 pistols are very good. (6) If you like revolvers, buy them and don't be too influenced by all the young shooters with their 9mm autos and larger capacity magazines. (7) As mentioned, don't sell your guns unless you absolutely don't like it. View quality firearms as something akin to gold... price generally increases over the long haul. (8) Don't get too hung up on price; look for FAIR prices on the firearms you desire to own and buy them. (9) Buy your guns before you get married as things may change. Priorities certainly change. (10) If you desire to start collecting guns, decide what you really like and stick to that general area. You are less likely to sell or trade them. (11) In most cases, if you see a gun at a gun show or store and it is sold before you made a decision, don't sweat it as there usually will be another one just like it. (There are exceptions.) (12) If you like gun shows, take cash enough for whatever that special something you desire is worth. (13) Start a envelope fund for guns and use that for shows and purchases. (14) Buy reference materials if you collect guns. Knowledge is important.
     
  14. Agent P

    Agent P Member

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    I appreciate all the advice. Thanks everyone!
     
  15. ShackleMeNot

    ShackleMeNot Member

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    Take as much training as possible as early as possible.

    I wasted a lot of time and ammo before I learned how to fight.
     
  16. Len

    Len Member

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    Great advice. I'll reinforce with:

    When starting out, have an experienced shooter guide you for a little while...it really helps to catch poor shooting procedures before they become habits. I had no idea what a "sight picture" was when I got started.

    When shooting, have fun, be safe, and concentrate on doing it by the numbers...improvement and skill are more a factor of sheer repetition than inherent "talent." I spent way too much time early on beating myself up for "terrible groups." As I shot more and more, concentrating on consistence, not groups, it just "happened" to get much, much better.

    Make your gun selection decision based on your needs, abilities and preferences, mixed with a little dose of friendly input. [As you can see on this site, there are endless discussions regarding "revolvers vs. autos," and "the 'best' calibers."] After a little practice, input from shooters...you're the one that has to shoot the thing, get what you like. I fell for the idea that "big is always better" when I purchased my first, a Ruger .41 mag. Let me tell you, that was no way to get started!

    Be safe, relax, determine your needs and desires for gun purchases, and shoot often.
     
  17. MikeIsaj

    MikeIsaj Member

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    Everything Len said.

    You need to build shooting skills on a sound foundation. Learn the fundamentals. You can learn them from a qualified experienced friend or pay for a class or three. Too many will spend $700.00 on the machine yet, hesitate to spend $50.00 on learning how to use it, then wonder why they don't enjoy it.

    Buy the guns you want, not what I want you to own. Listen to everyone but make up your own mind based on what suits you.

    The .22 is great to have on hand. I have been shooting at various levels for 30 years. I recently found myself flinching. Spent some time with the .22 erasing a bad habit that had developed.

    Make shooting a social event. It is much more fun and you will learn much as well as meet people with a common interest.

    Have fun.
     
  18. Greg L

    Greg L Member

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    Learn how to properly hold a semi auto pistol. Otherwise you may end up with an interesting slide shaped scar on your off hand thumb.

    Huh? Why that's just a bit of random information that popped into my head. I would never do something so foolish.... :uhoh:

    :D
     
  19. dfaugh

    dfaugh Member

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    Another vote for a .22

    I ALWAYS take one with me to the range...least expensive trigger time you can get...which means you improve faster,and get more comfortable faster...Can get whole box of .22s for what it costs for 1 round of some of my centerfire rifles...

    But I disagree somewhat about buying inexpensive guns...There's quite few out there, reasonable priced, and more than adequate for a beginner...And,until you find out what you really like, they'll get you started. If you buy used, you can often trade/sell them later without losing much of anything. Heck the most expensive gun I own cost $350, the least expensive(2)were given to me...There's a bunch in between, and all do exactly what I expect of them.
     
  20. BobCat

    BobCat Member

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    Another vote for getting involved in organized competition - not to get too "serious" - just for fun.

    You probably will find the really good shooters will be supportive and provide some coaching, to get you started with good habits, not bad habits.

    No one at the match ever told me to go home and not come back until I could post respectable scores. I think you will be pleased to find that most really good shooters are not snotty like that - they honestly want you to come to the match, shoot well, and enjoy the sport. Not interested in belittling your performance - interested in getting you to shoot better, have fun, and swell the ranks.

    Oh - and "Yes!" to the .22 - everything others have said good about the .22 is right, and you may find that even after you are comfortable with more "powerful" calibers, you go back to the .22 for relaxation and to hone your edge.

    Have fun!
     
  21. ACP230

    ACP230 Member

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    Don't sell guns.
    You'll miss the ones you let get away.
     
  22. entropy

    entropy Member

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    What the heck was post #17? :confused:
     
  23. Ala Dan

    Ala Dan Member in memoriam

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    Att: Agent P

    From past experience, I'd say stay away from POS firearms! You know,
    those inexpensive knock off's that are on most dealers shelves.
    If money is an object (which it is for many persons, including myself),
    save up the dollars and buy only quality firearms as made by a
    reputable manufactuer of fine firearms. :D
     
  24. Sunray

    Sunray Member

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    If you know what it is and you have the money, buy it. Even if you just got laid off. The government is going to change the laws so you can't have it. I'd have a BAR if I had known that.
    If you're looking at any Lee-Enfield from anywhere or anybody, always check the head space.
     
  25. halvey

    halvey Member

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    "Hi cap" guns allow you to miss more. :cuss:
     
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