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Shot a revolver the other day. Did not like much.

Discussion in 'Handguns: Revolvers' started by JesseJames, Jul 31, 2006.

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  1. JesseJames

    JesseJames Member

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    It was a double action .22lr revolver.
    It felt unbalanced in my hand and the action itself felt cumbersome. Seemed to take forever for the hammer to cock and the cylinder to rotate and the gun to go off. This can only contribute to detrimental accuracy. Which was the result when I shot it compared to a semi-auto that I also shot.
    I was surprised. I thought that I would favor the revolver but no. I shot very well with the semi-auto. Even during rapid fire. It felt right in my hand. As the weight was more, in my palm.
    Maybe I should try shooting in single-action for the revolver.
    Funny thing is I shoot better when I shoot fast. When I take my time to aim I shoot worse. The NRA rangemaster was a little irked that I seemed to just rapid fire the trigger. Probably thinking "He's totally ignoring follow-through! Damn him! That target's going to look like buckshot.". Then he saw my target when I was checking it and looked puzzled.
     
  2. Majic

    Majic Member

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    You have Jesse James for a name and can't shoot a revolver. :p
     
  3. MCgunner

    MCgunner Member

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    With DA, it's all about trigger control. You don't learn over night.
     
  4. GUNKWAZY

    GUNKWAZY Member

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    Nice one Majic :D

    By the way, you didn't specify the type of wheel you were pokin' holes with ?
    Could you give us that info ?

    Jeff (GUNKWAZY)
     
  5. JesseJames

    JesseJames Member

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    :D Hey, my handle is in honor of Jesses James of the Monster Garage. Not the outlaw!

    I don't know the brand of the wheelgun but it was a .22lr with like 10 round cylinder. The ejector rod was a pain in the arse. Seemed like it got stuck everytime.
     
  6. GUNKWAZY

    GUNKWAZY Member

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    Sounds like a crappy gun from the get go.
    Maybe you need to step up to a real Wheel ?
    Don't judge the entire wheelgun family by one bad spoke.
    Try another one, if you still don't like it, go back to beeing a bottom feeder.;)

    Jeff (GUNKWAZY)
     
  7. MCgunner

    MCgunner Member

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    H&R I'm betting
     
  8. miko

    miko Member

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    22 revolvers are harder to shoot than, say, 38 or 357 revolvers.
    I have a 7-shot 686 and 10-shot 617 which look like twins and 22 is harder in several respects.
    Same was with a friend's 8-rd J-frame snub in 22 compared to the one in 5-rd 357.

    It takes more power for a hammer to reliably set off a rim-fire than a center-fire primer. Also, more rounds in a cylinder mens same action should be accomplished in a shorter pull. Some people who got used to 6-rd 686 hate the feel of 7-rd model.

    Still, what seems to take forever and cumbersome the first try may become unnoticeable after even a limited amount of practice.
    Heavier/longer trigger pull are not that good for target shooting but they make the revolvers more suitable for real-life SD applications in the hands of someone who is not an expert.

    I suggest a lot of dry-fire practice - 5-10 minutes a day for a few weeks, before you shoot real ammo, even 22, again. Get your motor memory tuned up so you could concentrate on your target rather than trigger control.

    miko
     
  9. Deanimator

    Deanimator Member

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    It's a skill acquired with considerable difficulty, but well worth the effort.
     
  10. Deanimator

    Deanimator Member

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    That's often an ammunition issue.

    What brand and type of ammunition were you shooting?
     
  11. JesseJames

    JesseJames Member

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    I'm not concerned guys. It wasn't my gun and I don't plan on shooting it anytime again.
    I want to check out the Ruger Bisley .45 Colt though. I might even buy one. Ruger is tops in my book.
    Oh yeah, the semi-auto was a Ruger Mark III and I loved it.
     
  12. Dain Bramage

    Dain Bramage Member

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    Recently at the rental range I was comparing .22 revolvers, a Taurus M94 and a Smith & Wesson 617. The Taurus was adequate as a kit gun, and the Smith was reasonably accurate, but the action was not up to their usual standards, and I kept having misfires.

    On a lark, I tried their Ruger MkII as a counterpoint to the revolvers. Being more of a wheelgun guy, I didn't expect to like it.

    It's been a while since I shot a 'Mark'. It's bigger than you expect a .22 auto to be. Despite some odd bits (like the heel mag release) and the Star Wars blaster styling, I really loved it! The grip angle was good and the trigger was great. Right off, on this rental queen, I shot my best 25 yard group ever.

    Next time, at another nearby range, I'm going to compare a MkIII and a Buckmark. They have a couple of 617s I'll use as a counterpoint, to see if the first time was a fluke.

    In my opinion, there are no currently made .22 DA revolvers worth buying.
     
  13. Sunray

    Sunray Member

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    "...felt unbalanced in my hand..." That says it all. That revolver doesn't fit your hand.
    "...the action was not up to their usual standards, and I kept having misfires..." More likely the ammo. Mind you, all new firearms need a trigger job and few, if any, rental ranges will go to the expense.
     
  14. timothy75

    timothy75 Member

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    DA shooting is more physical than SA but once you get it down it acctually FEELS good to practice and is a lot of fun once you get the rythem down. You'll also shoot better when you go back to semi's. Its good to be proficient with either platform and you'll be rewarded with a sense of pride once mastered. Shop around for a used S&W 38spl to learn on, those guns come guaranteed with the smoothest DA triggers you've ever felt. Good luck
     
  15. Lonestar

    Lonestar Member

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    .22 rental guns always stink. They are usually the most dirty and abused out of the whole lot.
     
  16. EddieCoyle

    EddieCoyle Member

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    Yup. I got one and I love it too - right up until I have to clean it.

    I also have an old S&W Model 17. If you're going to be up my way (western edge of Middlesex County) PM me - we can go to my range. I'll bring the Model 17 and you'll find out how good a .22 revolver can be. If you want to try a .38, I'll bring a Model 14 - guaranteed to be one of the most accurate handguns you'll ever use.
     
  17. KIDGLOCK

    KIDGLOCK member

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    #1 why ?? see rule #1 below
    #2 some one tries to rob me I will be angery and theY will get a gun pointed at them .
    #3 Are you talking to a 2 year old ??


    The 4 below are the right rules .

    RULE I: ALL GUNS ARE ALWAYS LOADED

    RULE II: NEVER LET THE MUZZLE COVER ANYTHING YOU ARE NOT WILLING TO DESTROY

    RULE III: KEEP YOUR FINGER OFF THE TRIGGER UNTIL YOUR SIGHTS ARE ON THE TARGET

    RULE IV: BE SURE OF YOUR TARGET


    If you cant shoot a revolver , you should learn .
     
    Last edited: Aug 1, 2006
  18. Dain Bramage

    Dain Bramage Member

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    Maybe. The CCI Minimags in 36g HP didn't choke the Taurus or Ruger.

    A dirty gun is probably a good guess. I enjoyed shooting the 617 enough to rent one again.

    I'm just not in the market for a 10-shot, L-frame, DA .22. Something like the old model 17s would be nice, though.
     
  19. Eightball

    Eightball Member

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    Get a good Smith, and you'll be hooked. Revolvers are like beer, women, and just about anything with differing quality levels--try a good one, you'll be hooked. My S&W 620 4" balances perfectly, has a crisp trigger, feels amazing....shooting it for the first time in 2 days. I'm pumped.

    Just try a decent one, you won't be sorry.
     
  20. foghornl

    foghornl Member

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    I have several .22's, and they are ALWAYS way up on the "Fun Gun" list...plus, they are cheap to shoot. :D :D :D :D :D

    Got a MK II, and a Convertible Single Six, and a couple of .22 rifles, too. Looks like Ruger has discontinued the SP-101 in .22...Oh, Nubbins. Always meant to get one of those... :(
     
  21. Nhsport

    Nhsport Member

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    The 617s generally need to have the chambers brushed out every 4 or 5 cylinder full of ammo to stay slick.Some dirty type ammo will be worse than others.
    A double action revolver will take some time shooting to "learn" the trigger. You will never shoot some strange gun as well as one that you have shot a bunch,every trigger is a little different.
    When I was shooting my revolver a bunch when I was shooting 3 or so plate shoots a month (pluss practise)I could shoot much beter groups double action than single action
     
  22. ScottsGT

    ScottsGT Member

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    Modified slightly for any new shooters that might be reading.
     
  23. peteinct

    peteinct Member

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    Ive got a couple revolvers that work

    And I live in ct. You rev. may have been a poor specimen. My model 66 has a sweet trigger and my new 587 is ok. PM me if you want to meet up sometime. Search on my name and you can find some info about my club.
    pete
     
  24. BluesBear

    BluesBear member

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    If it was an eight shot is could be from a variety of companies.
    If it was a nine shot it was more than likely a Harrington & Richardson.
    If it was a ten shot it was preobably a Smith & Wesson.

    I have a 1979 H&R 999 that I'll put up against anyones revolver when shot single action. In double action it's still pretty dang accurate. The only misfires it ever had is with the .22 rounds I scavage from the range's dud-bucket that already had one firing pin strike on them. (most of those still fire just fine.)

    I have found that most .22 duds are a gun problem.
     
  25. Hammerdown

    Hammerdown member

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    Dont Give up on Quality .22 Revolvers Yet..

    Hello Jesse James
    I take it, this was your first attempt at revolver shooting? Unfortunately The caliber you had is known for lead build up and filthy Powder residue, which I am sure you are well aware of. I also see where another responder said that the Rental K-22 he fired had cycling issues, and I have seen but Not fired rental revolver's at local ranges where I live, and ALL have looked horrid and very neglected as far as cleaning and up keep. This will make any revolver suffer if the cleaning gets ignored no matter what brand it is. Another thing is, Most that fire this . 22 ammo also buy in quantity, or grab the Local Walmart specials in Bulk pack that are often Lead bullets as well, and I have found that cheaper ammo, and lead bullets add up to quick leading and cycling problem's along with sticky extraction in the K-22's along with other revolver's. Having a half dozen S&W K-22's I can say that they are without a doubt one of the best built durable revolvers Bar None. 30 Years ago, I started out with my first revolver being a H&R 922. This was a double action . 22 Revolver, and back then I hadn't learned to appreciate top quality, and was buying on a budget that limited my Purchase power to this functional but Cheap made revolver. I had it for a couple of years, until I got the opportunity to fire a friends K-22 Smith & Wesson. That was the turning point in my selection of quality from there forward as well. I swapped out that H&R for a Smith & Wesson K-22, and never looked back. I also found the Old Adage often said, "You get What You Pay For" to ring very true once I stepped up, and Paid the price to own a revolver of this quality and durability, and when I swapped off that H&R quickly learned it was a Low resale revolver, that I Lost money on. Smith & Wesson put many years of research and development into their K-22 Line, to make certain their revolver was one of the best out there. I Slipped once, from the Smith & Wesson line, and Bought a Colt Official Police in a . 22 as well, Although This is a collectible often sought after revolver, I found myself again to only return back to the K-22 as they seem to be temperamental on ammo selection, at least the one I had was, and timing was an issue on some of the early Official Police revolvers so I swapped it off Before I had any issues with it, that could prove costly. Again a purchase of a high demand quality revolver like that Colt netted me the funds to add replacement K-22 to my collection without having to pay any more out of pocket. I have never had a K-22 that did not shoot well, Either in double or single action. The Key to any revolver shooting . 22 Ammo, is owners responsibility of making sure it is cleaned and cleaned good after all shooting. 22 Ammo is perhaps the worse ammo for lead build up and powder residue that I know of. It does not take long to have sticky chambers or cycling problems even with a well built K-22 if Maintenance is neglected and lead starts to build up. This is the reason I shoot Only CCI Brand Mini mags in all my K-22's as well. This Ammo is a little more expensive, but burns as clean as the early Winchester yellow box ammo that is collector status today, hard to find and pricey when found. I shoot only copper plated bullets as well, as this cuts way back on the lead build up in the cylinder, forcing cone, Top strap, and face of the cylinder. I always clean all my K-22's after shooting them, and have no problems with extraction or cycling because of this, much required effort, that often gets over looked. I hope that first attempt with a revolver will not set the pace for you in the future and I would suggest that you shoot a K-22 in place of the one you fired and encountered problems with. If you ask any K-22 owner out there I have not heard any complain, and I believe Smith & Wesson named their revolver the appropriate name as the K-22 Masterpiece. I own a multitude of years in the K-22 line as well, Since the first issue was 1931 and there are plenty of them out there used, and have to say without a doubt they seem to have the smoothest action, fit and function, but the Winner of overall quality would have to go to the Original First edition K-22 fondly named the Outdoorsman. This revolver I have is a Prewar, and they hand fitted the parts back in this era, which makes the world of difference in quality. Today's revolver's all have drop in parts, and although I have the Modern versions of the K-22, None of which are new enough to have M. I. M. part's Yet, they are not as smooth as the Early Prewar editions that were the Start of later K-22 Masterpiece series to follow. I would defiantly shoot a K-22 before making a purchase, as I too was intrigued by Price one time to buy a Ruger Single Six and later replaced that with an SP-101. The Single Six, was a great trail companion, but did not hold a candle to the K-22 revolver on target shooting. The SP-101 was a heavy built revolver, and the action had a lot of creep and was not at all as smooth as any K-22 I have owned. Both Ruger revolver's functioned fine, but did not have the Target appeal or smooth actions of the K-22 Smith & Wesson's I replaced them with. Sadly, I also took a beating on resale of both Ruger's when I swapped them off and this was a learning experience as well. If fit, function, durability eye appeal, and smooth actions are of importance to you, then a K-22 will live up to it's expectations, and Grow in resale value as well. If you Think You Paid Too Much for a used K-22, a few years will Prove they are going up at an alarming rate due to consumer demands.Below are some of my K-22s for your viewing pleasure, that I have kept and updated to over the years, along with the Only Colt revolver I had for a short time. Best regards, Hammerdown

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