Quantcast
  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Springfield 1911 Loaded problems

Discussion in 'Handguns: Autoloaders' started by predator20, Apr 23, 2011.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. predator20

    predator20 Member

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2008
    Messages:
    33
    Location:
    FL panhandle
    I have Springfield Loaded I purchased several months ago. Overall it has been a good shooting gun. Today when I had it out it stovepiped on me twice. The cases were beat to hell when it did it. Ammo is WWB, bought it about a week ago. It had this same problem the last time I had it out (stovepiped once). But I thought it was because I was shooting reloads (GA Arms).

    http://youtu.be/lBDLt-Ia0mM

    I shot maybe three more mags after this and it shot fine. I bought the gun used, it had some custom work done prior to me buying it. Checkering, magwell, maybe some internal things too. I bought it off Gunbroker, so no idea who did the work. Bought it from Dean Forest RD. Guns and Ammo in GA.

    What's causing the cases to get beat up that bad?
     
    Last edited: Apr 24, 2011
  2. wow6599

    wow6599 Member

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2008
    Messages:
    2,417
    Location:
    Wildwood, MO
    Uh, the slide catching it and applying pressure...............

    Try using something besides WWB and change out your recoil spring.........if you bought it used you should replace the springs regardless.
     
  3. predator20

    predator20 Member

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2008
    Messages:
    33
    Location:
    FL panhandle
    Recoil spring has been changed. I went with a slightly heavier spring than standard, 18 lb. Do I need to go back to a 16 lb because of WWB?
     
  4. wow6599

    wow6599 Member

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2008
    Messages:
    2,417
    Location:
    Wildwood, MO
    With the crap Winchester has been putting out lately, you could probably go with a 14# spring..........or just keep the 18# in it and buy S&B, Federal, Remington, etc. Pretty much all in the same price range (Federal is cheaper, and my favorite) and can be found anywhere.

    Here is a thread going on about some WWB problems - http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=588520&highlight=WWB
     
  5. bofe954

    bofe954 Member

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2004
    Messages:
    502
    Your camera angle makes it hard to tell, but it looks like the brass is dribbling out of the gun. You could try the 16lb spring. Why go heavier anyway?

    That failure to feed that happened made me wonder if your extractor was too tight. Has the extractor been removed and cleaned lately?
     
  6. predator20

    predator20 Member

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2008
    Messages:
    33
    Location:
    FL panhandle
    Since the gun was used, I figured it needed a spring change, I didn't think an 18 lb spring would cause problems.

    No I haven't removed or cleaned the extractor lately. I'll do a detail clean tomorrow.

    Thanks for the help guys.
     
  7. J2FLAN

    J2FLAN Member

    Joined:
    Feb 29, 2008
    Messages:
    269
    Location:
    Calhoun Tn.
    May be a ejection problem if if it does it with different mags.see if the extractor is "clocking" or if the extractor hook is damaged. Pull the extractor and inspect and clean it and the tunnel then check it for proper tension. Also check the ejector nose profile and see if it is broke. those things can cause the brass to get eat-up in the ejection port. If you are not running a steady diet of +P ammo why not use the standard 16# recoil spring, thats is what is made to run with. I have had your problem with a couple of 1911s and have corrected it addressing one of those issues.
    OR, just try griping the gun correctly if that was you in the video, might be it.
     
    Last edited: Apr 24, 2011
  8. Skylerbone

    Skylerbone Member

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2010
    Messages:
    3,378
    Whatever the problem you'll need to start saving for a new video camera. Always point the muzzle down range. Always. Then change your spring. In the video, your brass is indeed dribbling out. If you plan on mostly WWB you can go 14, if you were simply checking function with cheap ammo put the old spring back in and see where it puts brass before spending more money. It shouldn't hit your shoes and it shouldn't hit the guy 3 lanes down. Somewhere in between is where you want to be with the ammo you plan to shoot.
     
  9. predator20

    predator20 Member

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2008
    Messages:
    33
    Location:
    FL panhandle
    While I guess I should be more aware of my muzzle. I'm completely surrounded by woods and nobody else is there but me. The camera is on a tripod. If someone else was doing the filming, I wouldn't have pointed towards them.
     
  10. Skylerbone

    Skylerbone Member

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2010
    Messages:
    3,378
    Always.

    I was hoping that was the case, as it apeared to be but still a rule to follow (or if you prefer, that whole 'never point a gun at anything you are not willing to destroy' bit). I know it may sound picky but old habbits...

    I saw little in your grip to indicate any problem and you look to be well in control at all times. My guess is still spring.
     
  11. predator20

    predator20 Member

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2008
    Messages:
    33
    Location:
    FL panhandle
    I know what you mean. I generally like shooting by myself so I can be more lax. But it is an easy way to pick up bad habits. If I am shooting with someone else, I'm well aware of my muzzle.


    My first few shots you can see I re-tighten my grip (just the ends of my fingers) and then I'm generally okay. That's the reason I brought the camera out there, so I can study it later.



    I've cleaned out the extractor tunnel, it was pretty filthy. I swapped in a spare 16 lb spring, so I give an update the next time I get back up there.
     
    Last edited: Apr 24, 2011
  12. gschoelles

    gschoelles Member

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2010
    Messages:
    44
    Sounds like weak ammo to me. I think I'd go there before switching springs.
     
  13. Skylerbone

    Skylerbone Member

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2010
    Messages:
    3,378
    Spring rate correlates to ammo used. A light spring will shoot most anything without fail but will allow the frame and slide to beat eachother to death when using higher velocity rounds. A heavy spring will force the slide forward too soon causing the FTE shown.

    There is no need or sense in spending money for premium loads unless the pistol is meant to be used for that express purpose.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page