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Standing Brass on it's Head

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by SC_Dave, Jan 17, 2013.

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  1. Twmaster

    Twmaster Member

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    Since I sort my brass by headstamp finding that odd 380 or 9MM Mak case is easy.
     
  2. dagger dog

    dagger dog Member

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    A Lee case collator is available for 12 bucks at fsreloading.com, you could make a stand then use it to drop the cases mouth up side by side on a flat tray.
     
  3. fguffey

    fguffey Member

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    "Using onion bags for sorted brass elevates that problem"



    Rather than talk about how bad things are going to be or how difficult components are going to be find I purchased 23,000 cases by the pound, 'onion skin bags?', The cases were sold in a 25 gallon metal barrel and 5 gallon buckets.



    Was not my intentions to out run you, it is called sweat equity, the junk disseminators do not care what a case is worth, they sell junk to metal dealers that do not have time to sort brass from brass, I know things have got to be different in Indiana, but in Yonkers when I ask them to sort the brass by size they 'HOLLER' NEXT! Then there is that part where I did not go to the business looking for 50/50 tin/lead bars and or fired cases, I do my best to make them to think I am not interested but for the correct price, I am tempted.



    Case inside of a case inside of a case? All the stacking happened before i purchased the cases.



    The question about sorting brass, was not my intension to miss you, the case head is heavier, when sorting by head stamp it is easier to sort when the cases are case head up, problem: the case head is heavier than the mouth of the case, not a problem for me, I shake the case tray to get the heavy end of the 9mm down, then cover the top with a flat tray, then flip. One more time, I sort by head stamp, and I do not use onion bags, I do not use zip lock bags, I have to be concerned about space, I purchase 4"X4"X4" boxes for .08 cents each, the boxes come in a bundle of 25. One 4"X4"X4" box will hold 288 223 Remington cases, 100 30/06 cases etc..



    Then there is cutting the 4" square boxes in half, 80 30/06 cases in each half, 2 X 80? 160 30/06 cases stacked, sorted neatly by head stamp and by year for 8 cents.



    Again, I do not know how it is done in Indiana.



    F. Guffey
     
  4. wtr100

    wtr100 Member

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    Jan 2, 2008
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    my sons can now tell the difference by sound when a .380 gets tossed into the 9 mm bucket

    :eek:
     
  5. fguffey

    fguffey Member

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    wtr100, I offered to share cases with anyone willing to sort, my grandaughter, at the time 5 years old, offered to help, not easy for me to concentrate when most of my time is spent telling her what a great job he was doing. I did have one friend come over and help, he was interested in the 10MM and 38 Special +P cases, I had to remind both to wash their hands. Her mother, my daughter wanted to know why it was necessary for her to wash her hands, then I was left with no help.



    F. Guffey
     
  6. lightman

    lightman Member

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    I use loading trays to sort brass. The odd 9's and 380's are easier to sort in a tray, standing up. I have several, as I buy stuff like this when on sale. Lightman
     
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