Quantcast
  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Stupid gun book

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by jsalcedo, Nov 25, 2005.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. jsalcedo

    jsalcedo Member

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2002
    Messages:
    3,683
    I just bought a book called:
    From 1450 to the Present Day The World's Great Handguns. By Roger Ford

    It starts off pretty interesting like most of these type books, history of cannon, gun powder etc... but then it rambles on about gun manufacturers and in a scatter-brained manner jumps around describing different guns, ignition methods, actions etc...

    It loosely and haphazardly decribes his pistol designs in no particular order mixing colt dragoons with nambus and flintlocks.

    My main problem with the book is the illustrations. They do not match what is being described in the text.

    Each photograph or illustration gives the caliber of a gun as a number instead of a cartridge for example:

    Colt .38 special Detective
    Caliber .38 in 9.6mm

    Most people know a .38 is .357in :banghead:

    Every illustration unless the bullet size is exact they take the name literally

    .44 magnum 11.17 mm

    .44 mag is .429 which is 10.89mm

    I can't see how the author who is supposedly a weapons expert could let 80
    pages of these glaring errors be published.

    To make matters worse he turns this supposedly encylclopedic work into a politcal soap box:

    :cuss:
    The Author Roger Ford is a specialist military and aviation writer who has written the "definitive book on macine guns "The Grim Reaper"
    His area of expertise is weapons technology and employment of weapons on the battlefield. He currently lives in France.
     
  2. Chipperman

    Chipperman Member

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2002
    Messages:
    4,572
    Location:
    Essex Co, MA
    "He currently lives in France."

    'nuff said
     
  3. M99M12

    M99M12 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2003
    Messages:
    187
    Location:
    Vermont
    It's OK. Ignorance is bliss.
    Just had an out-of-state friend ask me if I had a license to carry. :banghead:
     
  4. GT

    GT Member

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2005
    Messages:
    353
    Location:
    CT
    His English isn't right either, he means disingenuously.

    G
     
  5. Chipperman

    Chipperman Member

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2002
    Messages:
    4,572
    Location:
    Essex Co, MA
    "Just had an out-of-state friend ask me if I had a license to carry."

    OK to be fair, how many people who are not heavily into guns would know that VT requires no license?
     
  6. Standing Wolf

    Standing Wolf Member in memoriam

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2002
    Messages:
    24,041
    Location:
    Idahohoho, the jolliest state
  7. dfariswheel

    dfariswheel Member

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2002
    Messages:
    6,117
    I suspect this is another of those British "Coffee table" gun books you often see for sale on the clearance table of the local book store.

    These are written by British authors who MAY be small arms experts, but what they appear to do is to go to a British museum that has a gun collection, and "do a book" on whatever happens to be in the collection.

    It's for this reason that you find oddities that don't belong in the book, but since it's in the collection, looks interesting, and pads out the book, it gets included.

    This accounts for finding things like a rare S&W Schofield revolver RIFLE in a book about Submachine guns, an pictures and descriptions of home-made guns and really strange alterations to firearms that some European sportsman thought was just great.

    The real trouble starts when the author's publisher hands it over to editors who know NOTHING about small arms, and couldn't care less.

    This is why you find pictures mislabeled or a picture of the wrong gun being described.

    I have one of these British books with a picture of a very well used, but fancy Colt 7 1/2" Single Action Army pictured in a description of a Webley double action revolver, and a picture of a standard Soviet AKM in a description of a Russian AK-SU "Krinkov".
     
  8. jsalcedo

    jsalcedo Member

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2002
    Messages:
    3,683
    I've got quite a few of these type books but they are by Ian V. Hogg :D
    Everything he writes or collaborates on is fantastic.

    It's when I stray and buy the brand new $10 book at the discount book store
    is when I run into trouble.
     
  9. mole

    mole Member

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2005
    Messages:
    460
    Location:
    Georgia
    I picked up a copy of The Gun and its Development which is a fairly good book. In the edition I have they give a brief description of the "new" 98 mauser and 1903 springfield and much isn't known about the Mosin Nagant.
     
  10. Jim K

    Jim K Member

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2002
    Messages:
    17,566
    Most gun books by Englishmen or Frenchmen are nonsense, simply because the authors have never seen any of the guns they write so knowingly about. Supposedly Ian Fleming had advice from experts, but his gun goofs are legendary and silly. Further, the effort of English writers to be politically correct and translate every measurement into metric becomes first painful, then ridiculous, as they never seem to be able to get things right. One writer mentions "...the .455 Webley (116mm)..." and then caps that with a picture of a "...powerful .09mm Lager pistol." I was not sure if he was referring to caliber or alcohol content.

    Jim
     
  11. jsalcedo

    jsalcedo Member

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2002
    Messages:
    3,683
    I'm sure the latter influenced the former.
     
  12. ACP230

    ACP230 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2002
    Messages:
    2,293
    Location:
    Upper Michigan
    While I wouldn't call it definitive The Grim Reaper is a good book on MGs.
     
  13. Justin

    Justin Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2002
    Messages:
    19,270
    Location:
    THE CHAIR IS AGAINST THE WALL
    It may be a good book, but the title is asinine.

    +1 for Ian V. Hogg's stuff, though. I understand he died a couple of years back.
     
  14. Hawkmoon

    Hawkmoon Member

    Joined:
    May 5, 2004
    Messages:
    3,454
    Location:
    Terra
    Sort of sums it up rather neatly, don't you think?
     
  15. jsalcedo

    jsalcedo Member

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2002
    Messages:
    3,683
    That would be sad news indeed. Where did you hear about his death

    Last gun show I passed up a Ian v. Hogg signed copy of 1969 edition of Small Arms of the world for $50
     
  16. antediluvianist

    antediluvianist Member

    Joined:
    May 16, 2003
    Messages:
    182
    Ah, France. Got run out of Vietnam. Just like...ah....never mind.
     
  17. Bridger

    Bridger Member

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2004
    Messages:
    530
    Location:
    NY, PA
    Yep, one of those british coffee table books as so aptly described above. I used to like them when I was a kid for the pretty pictures :cool:

    Was milling about the bookstore the other day and saw one of 'em for sale, picked it up, looked through it. I realized I just know a lot more than whoever wrote that book. Went on and saw some books by Massad Ayoob elsewhere in the store, much better!

    I just don't understand how someone can claim to be a weapons expert but not own any or live in one of those countries. If you can't handle and shoot firearms on a regular basis then you can't possibly be an expert!

    I wonder if these authors ever run into any Americans who tell them how little they know?
     
  18. dfariswheel

    dfariswheel Member

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2002
    Messages:
    6,117
    I think these European, especially British "experts" ARE experts........on current and recent issue MILITARY small arms.

    It's when they start talking about civilian firearms that they expose their inexperience.

    More inaccuracy creeps in when the totally ignorant editors start putting pictures and text together.

    The worst I ever saw was an older (1970's) Italian book on pistols.
    Virtually EVERY description and stats listing was completely wrong in almost every way.

    As an example, the Colt Detective Special was listed as having a 1 3/4" barrel, with a "manual safety", AND a "hammer mounted safety".

    This inaccurate info was repeated for ALL Colt DA revolvers.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page