Quantcast

Tips for buying a used O/U for skeet ($1500 range)

Discussion in 'Shotguns' started by rugerdude, Oct 19, 2013.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. rugerdude

    rugerdude Member

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2004
    Messages:
    575
    Okay, so the big gunshow in Tulsa is coming up in a few weeks and I'll be looking for a dedicated skeet gun. What manufacturers should I be looking for?

    So far, I know that Browning, SKB, Winchester, and Beretta are safe bets, but are there any other I should be aware of that may realistically fall into my price range? What about Weatherby or Fausti shotguns?

    Franchi and CZ make some tempting sporting models at the upper end of my price range. I personally like Franchi's quite a bit (I have two) and from what I've heard the CZ's are one of the better Turkish guns....but they're still Turkish. Any new manufacture guns that may be worth at least checking out?

    I'll be shooting about 3k-4k shells a year for the next few years, if that helps narrow down the suitable options.
     
  2. kudu
    • Contributing Member

    kudu Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2003
    Messages:
    3,712
    Location:
    north central indiana
    Rather than a gun show I would be looking at gun clubs that cater to skeet shooters. Someone is always trying to upgrade and sell their old skeet setup, many times at a decent discount over going through a FFL.

    I would suggest a nicer used Beretta or Browning, they should be in your price range. I can't really comment on Weatherby shotguns as I have never seen one at a skeet, trap, or sporting clays range in the 25 years that I have been shooting. That in itself might keep me from getting one. I have shot SKB's and found them nice, but don't know how long they will hold up. I would suggest you stay away from Ruger Red Labels, had 2, wore the one out at less than 40,000 rounds, went back to Ruger, they replaced many parts, within another 10,000 it was acting up again, went back, they replaced a bunch of other parts. I then sold it to an occassional shooter. He was happy with it.

    I still have 28 gauge Red Label, it has a problem with the barrel selector if I shoot the top barrel first, so I just keep it on the bottom and go with it. I would get rid of it, but it is a joy to shoot.

    My current gun is a Beretta 682 with well over the 50k mark. I've seen some nice Blaser shotguns of late that the owners are very happy with as well.
     
  3. clang

    clang Member

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2005
    Messages:
    647
    It's hard to go wrong with a nice used Beretta 682.

    That being said, you really should try a few different guns before you buy one. The Brownings and Berettas are safe bets on the used market and they fell very different from each other.
     
  4. rugerdude

    rugerdude Member

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2004
    Messages:
    575
    Thanks! I had always heard mixed reviews of the Red Labels. Checking on armslist nationally I should be able to find several Beretta 68x models in my range, as well as Onyx models. They seem a little more refined in terms of feel. I know the Citori's last, but they feel like a 2x4 to me. I'd rather get a gun that will last me a few years that I LIKE than one that I don't that will last forever.
     
  5. kudu
    • Contributing Member

    kudu Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2003
    Messages:
    3,712
    Location:
    north central indiana
    I really loved the way my old Red Label shot, but there is a reason that Ruger quit making them. I have high regards for most all Ruger products, but the shotguns were not made for high volume shooters. The Beretta was as close to feeling like a Ruger handled as I could find, actually feels better to me, but was a big step up in price.

    I could shoot the Browning guns, but could never warm up to how they fit me, to me they swung like the proverbial 2x4. In other people's hands they were best thing since sliced bread. It is all in fit and feel, that's why there are so many variations of shotguns. I shoot all Remington gas and pump guns extremely well also, they just fit me and feel right. I have a M12 Winchester that is like a laser on the trap range to me also, bit it is custom fit.

    Find one that fits and go from there.
     
  6. Lerk

    Lerk Member

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2012
    Messages:
    267
    Location:
    MN
    I own an SKB built Weatherby Orion that I would have to be pried from my cold dead hands before I part with it. Has a nice solid feel to it but isn't on the real heavy side. Also fit me like a glove. One of the only O/U's that actually felt good to me, the only others ones that I liked the feel of were Red Labels.. I pick mine up barely used for IIRC around $900. I'm about 9,000-10,000 rds into mine without a single hiccup. The only thing I did was added a grind to fit limbsaver, the stock weatherby butt pad is practically tire rubber (solid as a rock). That also increased my LOP by 1/2" which makes it nearly perfect length now.

    If I ever happen to wear out the Orion, I'll likely be on the lookout for another one to replace, you just don't mess with a good thing.
     
  7. Virginian

    Virginian Member

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2003
    Messages:
    4,150
    Location:
    Williamsburg, Virginia
    There are lots of good choices, but my advice would be to stick with the Berettas and Brownings and go with whichever one feels best to you, because to me they do not feel alike at all.
     
  8. John3921

    John3921 Member

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2012
    Messages:
    483
    Location:
    Montana
    Beretta or Browning - I personally do not like Browning - as said above they feel like a club to me. But, fit is important in skeet - so get the one that fits best.

    The ideal skeet gun is heavy - mine is about 10 lbs with subgauge tubes installed. 30" bbl is the norm on o/u's. Adjustable combs and butt plates are common-especially if you are thiking about registered skeet.

    You'd likely be fine with a 28" bbl - they are pretty common on the used market because everyone HAS to have 30's now. You can purchase new bbls for Berettas (you can't buy browing bbls) and have them fit - but it's fairly expensive to do so.

    Make sure it locks up tight, the lever shouldn't be past 6:00. (if it is they can replace the locking lugs with oversize lugs and you're good for another 100,000 rounds or so.) Cock the gun (open it and close it) take off the forearm and the bbls and check that the 2 cocking rods in the bottom of the receiver operate correctly. They should be lightly spring loaded and pushed forward in their ways. If either is just loose then there is a jammed cocking rod lever in there that needs serviced.
     
  9. Snarlingiron

    Snarlingiron Member

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2006
    Messages:
    1,362
    Location:
    Fort Worth, Texas (Where men are men, and a lot of
    Give the Browning Cynergy a try. They have a locking system similar to the Berettas which allows the barrels to sit much lower in the receiver than the Citori. I bought one new with adjustable cheek piece and 30" barrels for $1600.00 a couple of years ago. I bought a used Beretta 686 first, but just couldn't warm up to it (fit issue, nothing wrong with the gun). I sold it and bought the Cynergy. It is the only one I use for clays now.
     
  10. rugerdude

    rugerdude Member

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2004
    Messages:
    575
    The Cynergy is definitely something I'm interested in. I'm 5'10" and 175lbs so 90% of factory guns fit me just fine. I'll have a hard time not snagging a Cynergy if I can afford one. I really like the simple-yet-aggressive styling and it does certainly look less 2x4-ish feeling than the Citori.
     
  11. cfullgraf

    cfullgraf Member

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2010
    Messages:
    8,552
    Location:
    East TN
    I would also suggest a Beretta or Browning. I would also see if you can get a used Skeet model. Skeet models have a stock and features geared towards skeet. Not a big deal but every little bit helps.

    While 30" barrels are the hot set up these days, 28" barrels were the norm for a long time. A 28" skeet gun would be an excellent starting point. You may even find one with a set of sub tubes. .410 skeet is a hoot and a humbling experience.
     
  12. GrandmasterB

    GrandmasterB Member

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2002
    Messages:
    735
    Location:
    Fort Worth, TX
    If you do a lot of reading over at Shotgunworld, they will tell you that a used Browning or Beretta is your best first choice, and if you can't find or afford one of these, the SKB is another very viable option.

    SKBs were made under the Ithaca and Weatherby names also. Many of these guns are older and have fixed chokes, but some have choke tubes and the ones that are fixed can be opened up for around $150 or less and you will have a gun that will last and can take the repeated firing and numerous rounds required by the game of Skeet.

    Often these SKB guns can be found in the $650 price range, much cheaper than a "B" gun, but still very effective, reliable and durable.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice