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Uncle Mikes Combat Grips for n Frame??

Discussion in 'Handguns: Revolvers' started by LubeckTech, Sep 28, 2010.

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  1. LubeckTech

    LubeckTech Member

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    Were Uncle Mike's combat grips ever made for the S&W N frame? I'd like to find a set for my 610 if they ever existed.
     
  2. Old Fuff

    Old Fuff Member

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    I'm not sure, but check out www.cdnnsports.com

    I understand they bought out all of the remaining supply of Uncle Mikes' when they quit the business.
     
  3. LubeckTech

    LubeckTech Member

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    From what I am finding UM didn't make their combat grips for the N frame.
    I have Pachmyer grippers on my S&W 610 (N frame RB) presently and want to reduce the trigger weight to around 8lbs and use Winchester or Federal Primers to get reliable ignition. The problem is the hole for the grip screw is in just the wrong place and won't let this happen. I like neoprene grips and have some Uncle Mikes on a L frame RB now. I will look to see if it may be possible to modify a K/L Uncle Mike grip to fit a N frame RB. More than likely it can't be done and I will wind up putting my original Hogues back on until I find something I like.
     
  4. Old Fuff

    Old Fuff Member

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    The only other option I can think of is Pachmayr.

    If the stocks cover both the backstrap and butt, you can modify ones made for the square-butt N-frame by filling in the void at the the rear/bottom with rubber culk compound.

    If the screw hole problem is caused because you are shortning the mainspring strain screw, don't do it. There are better answers.

    What you really want is a 10-pound trigger pull that feels like 8 - or less.
     
  5. TuckerNielson

    TuckerNielson Member

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    Last edited: Sep 29, 2010
  6. LubeckTech

    LubeckTech Member

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    I like the Pachmyrs I am using with it now and where the trigger is at the moment which is between 10lbs and 11 lbs gives me consistant ignition with CCI primers and I feel if it will light CCIs it will shoot anything. Basically the trigger is pretty close to where I want it now. I bought this 610 new about a year ago and I have noticed the older S&W revolvers I have tend to have much better triggers than the newer guns. I run my k and l frame guns at between 8lbs and 9lbs by purchasing a replacement strain screw (keep the original in a safe place) and file the replacement down until I get the trigger where it provides consistant ignition, feels good and can tighten the screw to a point where it is secure without being too tight. I have never tried anything else except to thouroghly clean and lubricate the interior. What would you suggest I start with to improve the trigger feel? The first thing which springs to mind is polish the surfaces inside the mechanisim which generate friction and possibly changing the trigger reset spring to a lighter one. Can shims be used to make the trigger and hammer move in a straighter line and remove any "wobble"?
     
  7. LubeckTech

    LubeckTech Member

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    Tucker,

    Hogues have came with most of the newer S&W revolvers I own and I prefer UM or Pachmyers. There is just something I don't like about the feel of them. I do have a Muchulek grip on my 617 - If you still have your JM wood grip would you like to sell it? I also have some Houges for warious revolvers if you would be interested in trading.
     
  8. Old Fuff

    Old Fuff Member

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    Questions, so many questions... :D


    Maybe, but if you get too light a hit (which you shouldn't at 10 to 11 pounds) a hang-fire may result, and if you are shooting a fast string in the double-action mode you may not be able to stop, and then fire the second round just as the first ones goes off. :eek: You really, really don't want too do that. :uhoh:

    Yes, I've noticed that too... :D But doing what works on the older guns won't necessarily help those with MIM lockwork. This is not to say that they can't be made better, but rather that some of the methods which are successfully used aren't the same.

    Not a good idea because you change the way the spring is curved or arced, and that curve is very important.

    Very good!! You are a lot smarter then some people I know. Never do anything unless you understand what you are doing, and all of the possible consequences.

    You're going to have to wait until I have time to send you (or post) a longer answer. But for the time being I STRONGLY suggest that you do neither. I have an unfortunately large collection of ruined parts that I obtained from people who didn't take my advice. The owners have another thing in common. They paid a stiff price to have their revolvers made right again.


    Yes, but more explanation is required.

    I hope that in the near future I can post a long and extensive thread that will go into much more detail on the right way trigger jobs are done, rather then the usual advise given over the Internet.
     
  9. TuckerNielson

    TuckerNielson Member

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    Old Fuff - I eagerly await that post.
     
  10. Old Fuff

    Old Fuff Member

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    I hope others are interested too. My problem is time, as the post (or posts as the case may be) is going to have to be a long one. The most common recommendation is to "polish the lockwork and then replace the mainspring (and sometimes also the rebound slide spring) with lighter ones. Almost anyone can do this, but it's not a good way at all. Professionals who specialize in working on revolvers, particularly Smith & Wesson's (I call them "pro-smiths") don't often do it this way for a number of good reasons, but others are unlikely to do it the pro-way because it requires a substantial outlay of money to buy the specialized tools, jigs, fixtures and gauges that are required. Anyway it should prove to be interesting... :uhoh:
     
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