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WD40 and a Resurrection Story

Discussion in 'Gunsmithing and Repairs' started by edwardware, Jun 15, 2020.

  1. Demi-human

    Demi-human Member

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    It’s totally easy.

    Just clean and anoint said firearm with “The Devils Yellow Mark” and dote upon it. Protect it. Imagine the day that a buck/duck/coyote is in its way and about to fall.
    Get really excited about it!

    Oh, dang. You missed the opportunity. Drench her down to keep her lubed for next year. Deposit in safe. Repeat.

    Remove rifle from safe and observe slight sluggish action. Little worry, spritz her down! Enjoy the range day with your friends. Wipe down the firearm to get the dust off and deposit it into the safe.

    Repeat step two and forget about it in the safe, since it’s been operating hard lately, replace it with a New Hotness...

    I’ll call you in ten years to tell you how to finish the rest of the experiment...


    A single experiment, even an empirically evidenced and scientifically methodized one with lots of jargon and data points, is anecdotal.

    Coincidentally, I found your result(one) on the internet...:neener:
     
  2. tws3b2

    tws3b2 Member

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    Been using wd40 on guns (The same guns) for over 40 years. The problem with people that bash wd40 is they Never Actually Used It Themselves. You pour wd40 or the finest oil money can buy on a gun (or anything else for that matter) If you don't go back and clean it once in a while you going to have problems. I had a gunsmith try to tell me that he gets Remington pumps all the time that the pump action stops working because of wd40 build up. Think about that. How is (ANYTHING) going to Build Up if you go in there once in awhile and clean it??? I have guns that I bought New 50, 60 years ago that I use wd40 on all the time. Never any problems. As a matter of fact- Remington 700, 30 06, 1974, Winchester 30 30, 1964. H&R 650, 22 revolver 1978. Muzzleloading Armoury 50cal. Black powder that I clean with soap and water. And more. None of these guns have ever had a single misfire, part need replaced or repaired. No problems whatsoever and I'll put the Wood Work and Metal Finish against any gun that age. Never a speck of rust on Any. All this bashing WD40 is purely bs by people who have nothing to do but cry and whine. Much like Democrats.
     
  3. Coop45

    Coop45 Member

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    I heard a lot of politicians have been sniffing it for years. I don't know who turned Favre on to it.
     
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  4. Demi-human

    Demi-human Member

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    Are you sure it’s not just humans with a different experience than yours?

    And yes, it does come out when cleaned.
    Kind of not the point though, huh? When so many other actual lubricants don’t do that.

    We don’t use rendered beef tallow anymore either.

    Nice HighRoading by the way.

    To try to offend Dems, non-dems, firearms owners that don’t use it, ones that do but are obviously slobs that can’t clean and others that can read an MSDS and know what the spray is for.

    The condition of your firearms has more to do with your own damn elbow grease than anything WD-40 has done for you.

    You sell yourself short, then place praise on a spray wax, while slighting others as ignorant or lazy, when all they’ve found is a better product.

    Yawn, nothing special. See it on the Evening News all the time.:)

    (Now tell me how terrible OneShot is...:D)
     
  5. FL-NC

    FL-NC Member

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    I use it for things like squeaky door hinges and sticky pliers.
     
  6. beag_nut

    beag_nut Member

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    Except for what it was initially designed for (displacing moisture in an old-style distributor cap), WD40 should be banned from the market.
     
  7. tws3b2

    tws3b2 Member

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    How many mossbergs soaked in wd40 and thrown in the dirt have you seen? I'm 73 and can say I've never see one. So, I don't know what a Mossberg soaked in wd40 and thrown in the dirt would look like.
     
  8. tws3b2

    tws3b2 Member

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    The kind of bs I was talking about. Notice Not one word of ever actually using wd on any gun. Not one word of having any experience with wd what so ever. Yawn, Just another pile of BS.
     
  9. Demi-human

    Demi-human Member

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    That’s because I don’t use it. I use gun oils.
    Oils specifically designed to lubricate firearms, not drive water from mechanical rotors, those things that computers killed.
    Funny, I use motor oil on motors and engine oil in engines, too. I use cooking oil to cook.

    Mostly because I’m not an septuagenarian Jack Wagon know it all, that believes nothing has changed from the fifties.

    (Helpful hint, things have.)

    But also because when my grandfather teaches me to use things proper I listen to him, not some curmudgeon on the net with a crusade.

    It’s actually a little hilarious you use my idiot cousin’s Mossberg as the example. Cheapskate meets cheap gun and used cheap lube. Stuck forearm. And yes. It did, unnecessarily, need to be cleaned out.
    And if you actually use them hunting, yes, they get mud in them. You have been duck hunting in your seventy-odd years so that you actually speak from experience, haven’t you? It’s not dry and clean...

    USE ALL THE WD-40 YOU WANT! You have my personal permission! In fact, I am happy you have a product you use and love. Even if it isn’t for lubrication.

    In fact, the company knew there original formal was garbage for lube, hence they came out with several more specifically oriented formulas.
    Way after you learned everything already.

    Did you know the Studebaker isn’t the best car anymore either?

    #ScienceisnotBS. I might have been born after you, but it wasn’t yesterday...
     
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  10. Jackrabbit1957

    Jackrabbit1957 Member

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    I wasn't gonna weigh in on this one but here goes, I have used WD40 off and on for years on my muzzleloaders with no adverse effects, some have sat for as long as 3 years without any issues what so ever. Not saying someone has not seen the problem described... I have personally never seen it. I generally clean my stuff after a day at the range be it black powder or modern so maybe the wd40 does not get a chance to become a problem. Most folks will stash their guns muzzle up in a closet or safe, I do too, one would think that gravity would settle the wd40 into all the little nooks and crannies goo up the works. I have never had any problems with this happening, even with traditional muzzleloaders.
     
  11. Dibbs

    Dibbs Member

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    THIS.

    Y'all do realize, that it's not JUST WD40 that does this, right ? Most oils, left for years on end, will desiccate, to a sticky varnish-like goo.
     
  12. MI2600

    MI2600 Member

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    Did you ever read those reports about all the different things WD-40 works wonders on? Did you ever see ANY reference to guns?

    Testimonial: I cleaned and liberally lubed 6-7 rifles with WD-40 prior to a three year stint in Germany years ago. They were stored in a dry, warm environment. Upon return, most, especially the lever actions, exhibited a very sluggish manner when working the actions. A through cleaning of the WD-40 restored them.
    I now use WD-40 for cleaning road tar off my car.
     
  13. tws3b2

    tws3b2 Member

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    Yes, as a matter of fact I have.
     
  14. Scooter22

    Scooter22 Member

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    I think this thread should be stopped. Seems theres no middle ground. I and many others know WD-40 will gum up guns. The faithful say it ain't so. Its the magic spray of God. They will keep the gunsmiths in easy money when their guns don't work.
     
  15. tws3b2

    tws3b2 Member

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    I don't say it's the magic spray of God. All I say is that I have used it myself for over 40 years on the same guns. That's the Same Guns for Over 40 Years. None have ever seen a gunsmith. None have ever had a failure of any kind. None have ever had any part replaced. WD has never had any affect on the wood finish what so ever. WD has never had any affect on the Blueing, Nickel Finish or Stainless Steel what so ever. And that includes my muzzleloader that I clean with soap and water. And I'll put my guns against yours or anyone's of the same age. I have used WD on all of these gun for as long as I have had them with absolutely no ill affects what so ever. Why don't you try it for yourself instead repeating all the bs you've been reading on the internet.
     

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  16. Scooter22

    Scooter22 Member

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    I know several gunsmiths that get gummed up guns every year since the 70s. They ask what the owner has been using. WD-40 is the usual answere. I,ve bought many used guns. Most of the sticky, gummy ones you can smell WD-40. I did use it sparingly when I first got into hunting/shooting back in the 70s with no problem. Mostly on the outside which is fine. Hoppes gun oil inside. Then I found G96 complete gun spray and have used that since. Great product.
     
  17. Carl N. Brown

    Carl N. Brown Member

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    Scooter22: "In my area your hunting guns usually get rained or snowed on. Plus it,s cold so they sweat when you bring them in."

    When you bring a gun in from the cold, put it under several layers of blankets to reduce moisture condensation.

    As a kid I stumbled on a reprint of C.S. Landis' book "Hunting With The .22".
    Since I was hunting with with my uncle with my .22, I read the book up.
    It also reprinted several stories about hunting and trapping in the Yukon
    (adventure stories for a teenage boy, but probable a hard life for the trappers and hunters).
    That's where I read the cold weather tip to avoid most of the gun sweating by putting the gun under blankets until it warmed up to room temperture, then pull maintenance.
     
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  18. Carl N. Brown

    Carl N. Brown Member

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    " How is (ANYTHING) going to Build Up if you go in there once in awhile and clean it???"

    THAT's the problem. Too many people don't go in there and clean it. They just spray again until it loosens up. Years later their gun is inherited gummed up years after last cleaning. My uncle and the insides of his Colt Junior .25 pistol, my som-in-law's late granma and the lock work of her S&W Chief's Special .38 revolver, my son's friend and the action's of his grandpa's Marlin Model 60 .22 rifle. Cleaning those up was a chore I only assumed for the sake of the heirs. OK, they were challenges and I took them on gladly, but I wouldn't do it for strangers.

    I'll use WD40 as a cheap readily available cleaner if I can remove the parts and wipe them down after cleaning. But for semi-permanent assemblies that should only be disassembled to replace broken parts (the lockwork of the Colt Juniot .25 or the S&W Model 36 for example) I do not recommend WD40 and my miserly Scrooge self will actual use part of my precious stash of Outers or Hoppes vetted for long term protectant.

    WD40 is so often abused rather than used there is a huge prejudice against it. It's the modern equivalent of 3-in-1 Oil.
     
  19. Scooter22

    Scooter22 Member

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    When you bring a gun in from the cold, put it under several layers of blankets to reduce moisture condensation.

    Good posts Carl. Never thought about a blanket. Old cotton one should wick any moisture away. Just don,t forget it or rust may start. I'd stand any cold guns in a floor rack with a small fan blowing on low to bring it to room temp and evaporate any condensation before cleaning. A friend thoroughly cleaned a still cold gun and put it away. It continued to sweat inside and he found rust when he pulled it out at a later date.
     
  20. JohnKSa

    JohnKSa Moderator Staff Member

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    'Anecdotal' and 'experiment' have accepted definitions and they don't overlap much. A properly conducted experiment is reasonably close to being the opposite of anecdotal--especially if it is repeatable.

    anecdotal 1: based on or consisting of reports or observations of usually unscientific observers

    experiment c: an operation or procedure carried out under controlled conditions in order to discover an unknown effect or law, to test or establish a hypothesis, or to illustrate a known law​

    The value of a properly conducted experiment is that it can be repeated. The proper method for disproving the results of an experiment is to repeat the experiment and demonstrate that the results are not as claimed. Alternatively, one could look for other similar experiments that were conducted properly to see if they provided similar results.

    Simply calling an experiment "anecdotal" doesn't dismiss its results.
     
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  21. Sistema1927

    Sistema1927 Member

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    My Dad believes that you only need two things in your toolbox: Duct Tape and WD-40. He says that if it moves, and it shouldn't, use the duct tape. If it doesn't move, and it should, use the WD-40.

    I keep the stuff far, far away from my guns, fishing tackle, and locks. It is good, as designed, for displacing water, but I haven't owned a car with a distributor cap, or lived where rain is a big problem, for many decades. And, I almost forgot, it works very well in getting soap scum off and water mineral deposits off a glass shower door.
     
  22. .38 Special

    .38 Special Member

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    Well, there is actually a middle ground. Several folks on this thread have noted that, used appropriately, WD-40 is fine on guns. And that really is the key. I doubt anyone here would argue that loading up the lockwork, year after year, is a good idea and cannot lead to problems. But frankly, I'm not sure if there is anything which can be used in that way without causing trouble.
     
  23. Demi-human

    Demi-human Member

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    Then I’d like to read the controls statement.:)

    Just like this statement.
    Yet we have plenty of contrary evidence.

    I find the last one the most interesting. I have found this statement to be true.
    Oil sludges, grease crumbles and paint dries. The sun shines. The wind blows.

    Yet, somehow, WD-40 doesn’t gum.:D

    We know it does, at a faster rate than other lubricants, gluing guns together. The same would happen with any other lube, paste wax, or grease. If left long enough with no maintenance. That’s why it is such a good rust preventative, it evaporates and leaves behind wax.

    Using it properly and having no issues says more of the impeccable care and maintenance of the owner than the wonderment of the formula.


    Since a vast majority of our experiences can not be isolated and controlled, let alone repeated exactly, those with the vehement assertion that the others are wrong have little to stand on.
    Similar the the stand on OneShot being terrible/wonderful, despite following the instructions perfectly/loosely and doing small/BMG cases.

    There are controlled experiments that say both ways are true for both compounds. Non hardened wax in suspension is a lubricant. Hardened old wax is gummy glue. These statements are true.
    Just as there are better firearms lubricants and protectants, and some humans don’t need them.:)
     
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  24. JohnKSa

    JohnKSa Moderator Staff Member

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    If there is a problem with HOW an experiment is conducted, that is worth pointing out. Had you stated that: "An 'experiment' that is not conducted properly, is anecdotal." that would have been reasonably accurate. However, your comment was: "A single experiment, even an empirically evidenced and scientifically methodized one with lots of jargon and data points, is anecdotal."

    You stated, in effect, that even if an experiment is carried out correctly, the information it provides is still anecdotal. That simply isn't correct. A properly conducted experiment provides repeatable results that either prove or disprove the hypothesis. That is, in fact, what makes those results so valuable.
    I'm not really arguing the point of the thread, merely pointing out a problematic statement.

    Continuing in that vein, 'evidence' (with no other qualifications) is a tricky word. I would say that both sides of this argument have provided 'evidence', the problem is that most of it isn't based on carefully controlled observations.

    Here are some examples I made up:

    I found a gummed up gun which is 'evidence' that WD40 gums up guns. (How do we know, with certainty, WD40 was used on the gun? How do we know that there weren't other contributing factors that are critical to the outcome? )

    I have used WD40 on guns and they never gummed up--that is 'evidence' that WD40 doesn't gum up guns. (WD40 has changed their formulation over the years and makes more than one product--which one was used? How do we know that there weren't other contributing factors--e.g. frequent cleaning, no use of other products which might interact negatively with WD40?)
     
  25. Ironicaintit

    Ironicaintit Member

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    I actually don’t doubt that wd40 may work as part of a process of cleaning/lubing. I think the problems show up when there’s no real cleaning, just continued lubing over a period of years.
     
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