What do you use for choke tube lubricant?

Discussion in 'Shotguns' started by whatnickname, May 2, 2021.

  1. whatnickname

    whatnickname Member

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    i don’t know that this subject gets much attention. I’ve seen some people use nothing at all for choke tube lubricant. I have also seen chokes that become permanently fused to the point that the barrel was destroyed getting the choke out. Perhaps the most commonly encountered choke tube lubricant is the one made by Birchwood & Casey. Looks to me like it’s grease mixed with graphite. Only problem with this stuff is that it’s a mess...hard to get off your hands and impossible to get off your clothes. Bought some Briley chokes the other day and saw that they had their own brand of lube. Ordered some. It appears to be a synthetic grease. Works well and not as messy as Birchwood & Casey. I also have some anti-seize lube infused with what appears to be copper. Good stuff but every bit as messy as Birchwood & Casey. Still a good size can for not much money (Brownells). I’m starting to think the kind of lube doesn’t much matter as long as some lube is applied. I’ve got several types of grease that I use on my automatic pistols one appears to be automotive grease sold by Wilson Combat. The other is a synthetic recommended for automatic pistols. Then there’s the old stand-by RIG. Is one as good as another? Is all of it marketing hype? Would we be as well served by buying a pint can of axel grease? What is your opinion?
     
  2. natman

    natman Member

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    Anti-seize is the best, but as you've noted it's messy and stains are impossible to remove. Regular grease is a reasonable compromise.

    My recommendation would depend on how you use the shotgun. If you have a duck gun that wears a Modified tube all year long, use anti-seize. If you are changing tubes constantly on a sporting clays course, I might even consider using oil. Grease splits the difference. In any case you should remove, clean and relube your choke tubes once or twice a year.
     
  3. entropy

    entropy Member

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    Well said, natman.
     
  4. mokin

    mokin Member

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    I bought a pint (probably a lifetime supply) of molly grease a dozen years or so ago when I assembled my first AR-15. I use that. Additionally, as natman recommended, I remove the tubes and clean the threads a couple times a year.
     
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  5. 12Bravo20

    12Bravo20 Member

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    I'm with everyone else. A good grease if you are changing out chokes on a regular basis. I also like using anti-seize for waterfowl hunting environments. Either way, it is not a bad idea to remove the chokes and clean everything up really well a few times a year. When I did a lot of waterfowl hunting, I always pulled the choke out and cleaned the barrel and threads really good after each hunting trip.
     
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  6. Arkansas Paul

    Arkansas Paul Member

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    I don't change choke tubes very often. Mine usually just has the standard full left in.
    I just use the same grease that I use for my breach plug in my muzzleloader.

    Somebody tell me if this is a bad idea. I figured it was close to the same stuff and saw no need to have 2 different types.
     
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  7. 1911JAS

    1911JAS Member

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    In my experience , I have found that lubricants for firearms are over priced for what they do. A quality molly or synthetic grease from the auto store will last a lifetime. As does a synthetic oil.
    If you are worried about clean up of standard anti seize, the food grade anti seize cleans up well.
     
  8. Virginian

    Virginian Member

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    I use Rem Oil or similar on extended target tubes. They always get removed and wiped down when I get home, and only get finger tightened. I use nickel Never-Seez on hunting chokes, and I never change those in the field. Never an issue in over 40 years.
    Can't recount all the stuck choke tubes that were brought to me for removal over the years when I was gunsmithing..
     
  9. Thomasss

    Thomasss Member

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    In the past as an active trap shooter, deer hunter and duck hunter something is better than nothing in the cold rain or snow; like Rem oil, silicone or auto grease. For the past 6 years I've been using Extreme Weapons Grease, (EWG) from slip2000.com. I found out about it at a military shoot when the temps were hovering around 10 degrees F. EWG grease continues to lube my Garand from -100 degrees F all the way up to +750 degrees F. Guns get hot and cool off quickly and it doesn't affect this stuff. It stays where you put it. I use very little. It works on choke tubes, muzzle loader nipples and breach plugs, Garand lube and fishing reels. I know they got lubes for all these items, but the grease is just fine. I bought 4 oz. tub and haven't used a fourth of it yet.
     
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  10. ColtPythonElite

    ColtPythonElite Member

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    White grease from a spray can
     
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  11. entropy

    entropy Member

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    Been shooting on Mars and Venus again, eh? ;)
    Slip 2000 makes some good products.
     
  12. Milkmaster

    Milkmaster Member

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    I have a small tube of white lithium grease. Not smelly or messy. Had that same tube for a decade or more. Little goes a long way.
     
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  13. FL-NC

    FL-NC Member

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    I have a tube of that stuff called choke tube lube somewhere. Seems automotive anti-seize would work great too- if it frees spark plugs in a cylinder head, no reason it wouldn't work on a scattergun I guess. Cylinder heads on a Harley get much hotter than my shotgun barrel.
     
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  14. ApacheCoTodd

    ApacheCoTodd member

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    3in1 or Marvel's Mystery Oil, motor oil or whatever came with the last used cleaning kit I bought for its rods.

    I'm not picky and have no regrets - yet.


    Todd.
     
  15. cdb1

    cdb1 Member

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    Spanish Jim’s Rust Remover
    C55049C6-33BF-4D2E-B720-35FF55ACEAD9.jpeg
    Make rust head south of the border with Spanish Jim's!"
     
  16. cfullgraf

    cfullgraf Member

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    I use the grease sold by Briley. But, if I got into changing the choke tubes frequently than I currently do, I'd have to find a more economical substitute.
     
  17. red rick

    red rick Member

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    I use white lithium grease or the grease that I use for my muzzleloader , which ever one that I can find when I am cleaning my gun . I also use it every time that I clean my gun .
     
  18. George P

    George P member

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    If you shoot a lot, you should be cleaning your gun after every range trip; clean your chokes at the same time as well as the threads inside the barrel. It's amazing how much gunk from powder can get in between the wall and the tube
     
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  19. George P

    George P member

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    I have used RIG, Shooter's Choice grease, silver anti-freeze from the auto parts store, basic gun oil; in reality ANY lubricant will work
     
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  20. natman

    natman Member

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    Good advice. I should have made it clearer that cleaning the tube once a year is the minimum for guns that are not shot often.
     
  21. Fishingted

    Fishingted Member

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    Gorilla Grease. Same as I use for breech plugs and Nipples om my muzzle loaders.
     
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  22. BillWM

    BillWM Member

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    Mineral oil lightly applied is all you require for firearms. Many have said regular removal of the choke prevents seizing which is correct. Mineral oil is clear, does not gum, lubricates and prevents rust.It's also less expensive than all the snake oils charging $100's a gallon, just ridiculous.
    Just pick out a average size can or tube of gun oil and then figure it as the price per gallon, it's insane. No oil is that good to demand such $$$$$$
     
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  23. Bill M.

    Bill M. Member

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    Simple soul that I am, I use choke tube lubricant to lubricate choke tubes. I keep a little rag in the shooting bag to wipe my hands when I change chokes.
     
  24. Nature Boy
    • Contributing Member

    Nature Boy Contributing Member

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    Lubriplate.

    Every gun I own gets it where grease is called for
     
  25. whatnickname

    whatnickname Member

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    I shoot sporting clays at least twice a month and always 100 rounds per session. I clean my choke tubes while they are installed in the barrel. I find the location of the choke tube threads has quite a bit to do with how often I clean the threads of the tube and barrel. Beretta chokes and the Browning DS chokes have threads that are closer to the muzzle and seem less inclined to foul with powder residue. Remington chokes have threads at the other end (closer to the juncture of the barrel and the start of the choke tube). They seem more easily fouled. I clean these barrels and choke threads more frequently for this reason. I always re-lube the choke threads after cleaning the barrel with the choke installed. If I notice any resistance in re-installing the choke I pull it and thoroughly clean the threads on the choke and barrel. What I will change going forward is the lube depending on the way I will use the gun. If I’m going to get into a higher than normal volume shooting session or shoot heavy magnum loads, I’m going to switch the the copper anti-seize grease I got from Brownells. Otherwise I’m going with one of the synthetic greases or RIG as opposed to the more expensive choke tube lubes.

    I want to thank everyone for sharing your thoughts and advice with me. Very helpful as always!
     
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