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What does trajectory mean?

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by azhunter122, Aug 26, 2008.

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  1. azhunter122

    azhunter122 Member

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  2. OAKVILLE SHOOTER

    OAKVILLE SHOOTER Member

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    Where you see the 0 is the range the rifle is sighted in at.

    In this case, the short range is 100 yard zero. The bullet will be 0.1 inches low at 50 yards, 1.2 inches low at 150 yards, and 3.8 inches low at 200 yards, etc.

    The long range shows a 200 yard zero. The bullet will be 1.9 inches high at 100 yards, 1.6 inches high at 150 yards, 3.2 inches low at 250 yards, 7.9 inches low at 300 yards, etc.

    Hope this helps.
    Oakville Shooter
     
  3. jhansman

    jhansman Member

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  4. The Lone Haranguer

    The Lone Haranguer Member

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    Trajectory, as it applies to firearms, is the path the bullet takes after it leaves the muzzle of the firearm. It will always travel in a parabolic arc, although the arc will be much flatter and longer than, say, a pop fly baseball. ;) It is slowed down by gravity and atmospheric resistance. A "flatter" trajectory means there is less bullet drop between the firing point and the target, making less "holdover" necessary to hit the target at long ranges. We don't worry about this as much in handguns because the ranges are closer, but it is a concern with rifles.
     
  5. Chipperman

    Chipperman Member

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    Remember also that barrel length will affect the trajectory. When you look at the charts they are assuming one barrel length, which may or may not be what you are using.
     
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