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What dose double tap mean?

Discussion in 'Handguns: Autoloaders' started by drf, Sep 24, 2004.

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  1. drf

    drf Member

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    Could someone explain to me what double tap means....Thank U....drf
     
  2. Guns_and_Labs

    Guns_and_Labs Member

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    Two shots, close together. Tap, tap.

    At least, that's what I mean when I say it.
     
  3. clipse

    clipse Member

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    Sometime on these forums people get a bit clicky on the mouse and you end up with two posts exactly alike. Oh, wait, you were talking guns weren't you? :D


    clipse
     
  4. Preacherman

    Preacherman Member

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    There's a difference between a "double-tap", also called a "hammer", and a "controlled pair".

    In a "double-tap" or "hammer", you obtain one sight picture, fire your first shot, and immediately fire a second, as fast as you can, relying on your grip and shooting stance to keep the gun roughly on target. You don't take a second sight picture. At short ranges (say 3-5 yards for the average shooter, out to 7-8 yards for one more experienced) this should keep both rounds on the target. The object of the exercise is to "hammer" the BG with a double dose of impact energy, very quickly, thus making it more likely he'll go down. A moderately well-trained shooter can do a "double-tap" in less than half-a-second.

    The "controlled pair" is similar to the "double-tap", but slower, in that a sight picture is taken before each shot. This means that this technique can be used at longer ranges, out to 12-15 yards, by a skilled shooter. However, the time between shots is longer, so the "hammer" effect on the BG isn't quite as profound. A moderately well-trained shooter can do a "controlled pair" in less than a second.

    A "double-tap" typically requires a decent trigger pull on your handgun, too... it can be easily achieved with a tuned 1911 single-action trigger, but is a whole lot more difficult (although not impossible - see Jerry Miculek! :D ) with a double-action revolver trigger.
     
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