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Which NAA Guardian?

Discussion in 'Handguns: Autoloaders' started by chaim, Nov 25, 2003.

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  1. chaim

    chaim Member

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    Either tomorrow or Wen I will be going to the gunshop to set up the transfer for a gun I bought online (the S&W 57, no I still haven't set it up yet:eek: ). When I do I will be buying another gun at the same time. I have a few that I'm thinking about. With most I am pretty good on the plusses and minuses in relation to each other. However, I'm considering an NAA Guardian and they have one in .32acp and in .380. Well...

    If I buy an NAA Guardian should I get the .32 or the .380 and why? What are the advantages of each? Early on I seem to recall that the .380 had more problems than the .32. Was that simply something with the early models that has been solved or are the .32 NAA Guardians still more reliable than the .380 Guardians?

    I don't really want to hear about a .32 v. .380 caliber debate. I know that each has advantages and disadvantages in relation to each other. What I am specifically looking for is a comparison of the NAA Guardian in those calibers. Are there any quality and reliability differences anymore? What NAA Guardian quirks should I look for? How do you like yours (if you own one)?
     
  2. David4516

    David4516 Member

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    Don't forget the .32 NAA... a .380 case necked down for .32 cal bullets :what:
     
  3. WonderNine

    WonderNine member

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    I'm not aware of any differences in realiability with the current crop, but the .380 Guardian is a bit heavier and larger than the .32. However it is still very small and light. Personally I would go with the .380 if I had to choose between the two and use some warmish .380 loads.

    And they are both 6+1 capacity.
     
  4. chaim

    chaim Member

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    David, in MD there is now a built-in lock law. All guns made after Jan 1, 2003 must have a built-in lock which can disable the trigger. There are a few of the .32NAA guns around (I know where there is at least one). My point here is that while ammo is difficult to get anywhere for this caliber if this caliber takes off it might become easier to find. However, here in MD there are probably no more than 100 guns in this caliber (maybe more, but again, only those made before 1/1/03 can be here and how many guns in this caliber were sent to MD before then) so as hard as ammo is to find elsewhere, it is pretty much impossible to find here. I don't reload auto ammo, and while I could (though I'd prefer not to have to chase after my brass), I also like ammo I can find commercially.

    The only options I'm considering are the .32acp and the .380acp versions.
     
  5. HogRider

    HogRider Member

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    I have the 380. It took me about 150 rounds before it was broken in and reliable. It seems to like hot loads. Target ammo makes it jam sometimes. With self defense loads ( JHP ) it works flawlessly now, but that dam*ed little thing is a hell to shoot if you have larger hands like me. At the last trip to the range I shot about 100 rounds and after 50 rounds I put gloves on because the trigger guard was eating the skin of my Index finger. It sure isn't a gun for a lot of target practice.

    I have never fired the regular .32 or the .32 NAA so I cannot compare.

    My Experience: The NAA .380 is a very solid gun and I would buy it again.
     
  6. tomkatz

    tomkatz Member

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    From what I have read/heard the 32 can have rimlock problems that the 380 doesn't suffer from, I'd go 380......tom
     
  7. MikeJ

    MikeJ Member

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    I have the .32 Guardian and love it. It has been 100% reliable so far and I have owned it for quite some time. I looked at the .380 after it came out with the intention of getting one but the difference in size and weight was just enough that it didn't fit comfortably as a full time pocket gun. I know that many people don't agree with that but I like very small guns for pocket pistols and the .380 felt like a hefty rock in my pocket, it is about 50% heavier than the .32. So to me the bottomline is, how do you plan on carrying it? If it is in your pocket, make sure you try both of them out to be sure they both work for you and if they do I would get the .380. If not the .32 makes a great little pocket gun. Mike
     
  8. George Hill

    George Hill Member

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    The .380 gun is a larger gun that the .32 Guardian. The .380 sized frame is much more shootable and comfortable... unless you are using hot ammo and for some reason it just nails the nerve center in the meat between the thumb and forefinger and it makes my hand go numb. I've NEVER had this in any other gun. Ouch!
    Still. A Guardian isn't something that I would be shooting a lot, but it would be a gun that I carried all the time, perhaps as a backup to my main carry gun.
    Since I am not shooting it very much - I'd go ahead and get the .32NAA. I don't think the caliber would get popular, but I do think it's the better mousegun choice due to a higher degree of reliability. If your in a situation where you must draw your mousegun - It had better go bang EVERY time I pull the trigger. I am not concerned about the smaller slug - because I'm pumping the goblin with every shot in the magazine, and then reloading.
     
  9. SouthpawShootr

    SouthpawShootr Member

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    I have the .380 and I like it pretty well. It's my go everywhere (except work) gun. One thing I wish I had done, though. I wish I had ordered it set up the way I wanted it. Specifically, I wish I had gotten the Guttersnipe sights and a dehorning job. Since you live in one of those states you might not be able to custom order one, though if by chance you can, do it. I've seen some indications on the NAA website that they were working towards a model with an internal lock, but, so far as I know nothing has come of it. Mine had a rough go at it during the first 100 rounds. After that it's been fine. It is somewhat fatiguing to shoot for more than 100 rounds at any one given time.
     
  10. AZ Heat

    AZ Heat Member

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    My vote is for the .32NAA. I've read some really good reviews and this is next on my list.
     
  11. David4516

    David4516 Member

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    Too bad you can't get the .32 NAA. Sounds like it will be an interesting caliber. One of these days when I have money (more like "if" I ever have money :( ) I'm going to buy another Makarov and convert it to .32 NAA just for the heck of it...

    Well if you can only get .32 or .380, I'd probably go with .32 ACP because the gun is smaller and lighter, but on the other hand .380 is the better caliber, so it might be a toss up...
     
  12. George Hill

    George Hill Member

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    Once you get the gun, it's perfectly legal to get it modified to a form that was not originally allowed when it's along the lines of options and finishes and such. This was talked about in another thread.

    Guttersnipe sight... don't like it. Ashley Big Dot... Love it. Just smooth it off for no sights... Like that too.
     
  13. cidirkona

    cidirkona Member

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    My vote is on the KelTec p-3AT.

    -Colin
     
  14. QuarterBoreGunner

    QuarterBoreGunner Member

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    Another vote for the .32; though I havn't fired the .380 in all honesty so it may be just as good.

    One quirk that my gun has is that it will consistently stovepipe the LAST round in the magazine. Since it's the always the last round, I gave up on trying to fiddle with it- at least the first 5 always eject just fine. And yes, I've tried three different magazines and a variety of ammo. Still does it.
     
  15. chaim

    chaim Member

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    Um, I'm specifically asking about the two NAA Guardians, don't really want other suggestions here. Also, new Kel Tecs aren't legal for sale here in MD (no built-in lock, no factory supplied shell casing).
     
  16. schild

    schild Member

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    The reason the last round stovepipes is that the gun has no ejector and relies on the next round in the magazine to act as the ejector, empty mag equals no ejector.
     
  17. George Hill

    George Hill Member

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    Funny, in the .32NAA, I didn't have one of those last round stove pipes in over 160 rounds fired.
     
  18. erh

    erh Member

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    I like both, but my G32 is "Tricked Out" now; the .380 acp is soon to follow! (erh)
     
  19. ulflyer

    ulflyer Member

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    Chaim: I know this is an old thread, but what did you decide on? I have one of each and carry the 32 most because its lighter. Both fit nicely in the little NAA belt pouch and you barely know you have it on.
     
  20. Zerstoerer

    Zerstoerer Member

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    .32 ACP 100% reliable with Winchester Silver Tips. No break in, just works.
    Last round may stovepipe but that might not be a bad thing as it will tell you that it is time for a mag change.

    Only for Rule 1 carry ("Have a Gun"). Best use as backup to compact.
    Very good with the 'wallet' - "holdster" as advertised on the NAA website.
     
  21. RyanM

    RyanM Member

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    Not all of the Guardians stovepipe on the last round. Sandy said he wishes they could make them all do that, since it would be like a slide stop, but apparently there's no one factor that causes it.

    I'd probably recommend the .380. It's heavier and larger than the .32, but it's still really tiny. Also, according to my calculations, the .32 actually has a harder recoil because of the lighter weight. I used to own a .380 one, before I traded it for a G23. It was reliable and accurate, but it was pretty unpleasant to fire.

    If for some crazy reason you get a .32 NAA, stick with the 71 gr FMJs. High velocity or not, 60 grains is far too light a bullet to get both expansion and penetration. 60 gr at 1222 fps can only expand to .408" and still go 12". Fat chance, with the frag-o-matic bullets that Cor-Bon uses. In a defensive gun, you need penetration.
     
  22. ulflyer

    ulflyer Member

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    NAA

    I have both, having started with the 380 and found that the kick was uncomfortable for me to shoot more than a few mags and the trigger pull would soon wear me out. So i got the 32acp and the kick is a bit less, and while the trigger was equally as hard to pull, it is a much short pull, giving the perception of being easier. The 380 rarely stovepipes on the last round, the 32 occasionally. Have never had a functional failure on the 380 but did have a couple or so with the 32 in the first box. Second box was one, third box none. Personally I like the 32 best because of its lighter weight, but haven't decided if I want to sell the 380, until I can assure myself that the 32 is equally as reliable.
     
  23. pcf

    pcf Member

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    Chaim, there are alternatives to an integral lock.

    http://www.mdsp.org/downloads/Safety_devices.pdf

    Several of the lock's are removeable and can be installed in many different handguns, the visualock (order .5-1" shorter than barrel length), interbore gunlock, omega lock, and GSI lock (semi auto only), and Springfield ILS (1911 only). Looking at a 9mm visualock, I'm pretty sure that there's enough brass on it to turn it down to fit a 32NAA, not that you want one, but it could be done.

    An internal lock only has to present at the time of sale, there are no provisions in the law beyond that.

    If there is a handgun (pistol or rifle caliber) you want that was produced after 1 Jan 03 and it doesn't have an integral lock, don't let that be a deterent. It's assinine to put it this way, it's not a show stopper but an extra expense.
     
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