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Why are double bbl rifles so expensive?

Discussion in 'Rifle Country' started by RDCL, Jun 28, 2009.

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  1. RDCL

    RDCL Member

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    I realize double bbl sxs shotguns can get expensive as well......but at least a nice double shotgun can be had for less than a grand.

    Russ
     
  2. NELSONs02

    NELSONs02 Member

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    Because of the way sxs rifles are manufactured. It takes a great deal of precision to get the barrels aligned properly so the sights deliver accurate poi with both barrels.
     
  3. Poprivit

    Poprivit Member

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    expensive double guns.

    I'm a writer for African hunting and other magazines. I just finished interviewing Butch Searcy of Searcy Ent. maker of double rifles. I photographed all the hand work that goes into fitting, regulating, stock making and engraving necessary to manufacture a .577 Nitro Express that sells for $55,000 and up. The amount of work takes skilled craftsmen many, many man hours.

    Oh, yeah, Butch doesn't drive a Bentley ... Ford F-150.
     
  4. zoom6zoom

    zoom6zoom Member

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    Lower demand must be factored in as well. It's a niche market.
     
  5. gbran

    gbran Member

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    Up the ante. I'd really like to have a good drilling.
     
  6. starkadder

    starkadder Member

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    Basicly most double rifles are produced by high end gun makers, and they sell them for what they do because they can. It is a nieche market but if one of the american companies would decide to build one it can be done affordibly. Modern manufacturing techniques are amazing and you can't convince me that it could not be done for a fare price. :banghead:


    This is this! It's not something else, it's this!

    Don't pull it if you don't plan to use it, and don't use it if you don't plan to kill!

    ALWAYS REMEMBER OUR MEN AND WOMEN OVER THERE.
     
  7. federalfarmer

    federalfarmer Member

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    I agree, there is no reason they can't make one for $1,500 to $2,500 (in most calibers). :banghead:

    How fun would they be open sites for bear hunting and other close work!

    Make me two -- a 45-70 and a 300 Win.
     
  8. stubbicatt

    stubbicatt Member

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    Baikal imports a double rifle. I think it is had in either 30-06 or 45-70. Around $1000. Here is an example.
     
  9. Jim Watson

    Jim Watson Member

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    Just what I was fixing to say. If you want an economy double rifle, check out the Baikal. It takes a strong stomach, though.

    The least expensive nice double I could find this morning is a Merkel 140 for about $6000. You could get one for less in Australia, for some reason, maybe US $4000.

    There are various O/U rifles for less money than SxS.
     
  10. jdh

    jdh Member

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  11. SaxonPig

    SaxonPig Member

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    There are different types of doubles. the O/U can be made fairly cheaply as can the box-lock. Most field grade doubles are box-lock designs. The side-lock action is very intricate and requires tremendous hand fitting.

    As noted the regulation of the barrels is time consuming and laborious. Also, most buyers of double rifles want quality rather than mass production.

    There have been mass produced doubles but they are ugly and generally have not sold well. I understand the Baikel is no more.

    They could make a $3,000 double but it wouldn't sell. Most shooters would shy away from a gun priced that high and those who could afford it would demand more deluxe features than would be found on such a gun and would pay more to have them.

    I have had a love affair with the double for as long as I can recall. I own but one. I bought it 33 years ago for $1,900. That was a fortune in 1976 to a starving college student but I wanted it very badly. Shoots dead on at 100 yards with the barrels printing within 1/2" of each other. This rifle, a box-lock field grade gun in a medium bore caliber, sold new in 1910 for $140. To put that in perspective, at that time a top of the line S&W revolver cost $19.

    On the verge of being 100 years old, and having traveled much of the world as it went hunting with a British army officer as he was posted in various countries, it still looks pretty good and shoots great.


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    Last edited: Jun 29, 2009
  12. rogertc1

    rogertc1 member

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    Saiga 12 is shorter than that and only around $500
     
  13. HetchHetchy

    HetchHetchy Member

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    1.) Very limited demand, thus difficult to amortize design and tooling costs.

    2.) Most doubles that are sold are fancy firearms. They would be expensive even if they were bolts.

    3.) Compared to a similar caliber bolt action rifle, there's a great deal more hardware involved -- second barrel, trigger assembly, etc. This also impacts #1 -- particularly at the entry level.

    4.) I think the barrel regulating is a crock for the most part. Almost like an excuse that's maintained. What I mean by that is that I do think regulating barrels via traditional methods is indeed expensive. That said I think that superior processes (and barrel designs) already exist that make this process very straightforward, efficient and inexpensive -- although the barrels themselves, particularly chopper lump barrels can be expensive before regulation.

    5.) Barrel regulation is for a specific load, thus limiting the versatility and demand for the gun.

    5.) Design. I think if someone gave Ruger an order for 500K doubles in say .500 NE, that they would have no trouble designing and selling them for a very reasonable price.
     
  14. Acera

    Acera Member

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    Dude do you have a clue you dug up a 7 year old thread?????

    The guy that asked the question has not been here for almost two years!!!


    Wow, necroposting at its best.




    .
     
  15. Panzerschwein

    Panzerschwein member

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    Baikal made or has had made a .45-70 Double Rifle that is affordable for the average end consumer.
     
  16. MechAg94

    MechAg94 Member

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    I thought I heard of a US outfit that took CZ double barrel shotguns and modified them as double rifles. I thought the price at the time was still $5K or something.

    I think a double would be great to own, but a nice one that is well made and accurate.
     
  17. Predator55

    Predator55 Member

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    The workmanship is what makes the cost go up and the regulating of the barrels. Putting them together and taking them apart and firing rounds through each takes many hours. Now with lasers I assume regulation is much quicker but why sell for a lower price when you,don't have to. Sabatti came out with some decent doubles, 45/70, 9.3x74 and then some African calipers. 3/5 k and some of them shot well. The closet I'll get to a double rifle is my sxs slug gun the has been regulated by one of the best out there. I stumbled upon it and it shoots two slugs in the same hole at fifty yards, so it's perfect for deer and bear defense in the woods.
     

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  18. Robert

    Robert Administrator Staff Member

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    Bad zombie thread...
     
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