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Why are Moras so darn sharp? Steel?

Discussion in 'Non-Firearm Weapons' started by Bartholomew Roberts, Jan 27, 2013.

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  1. Bartholomew Roberts

    Bartholomew Roberts Moderator Emeritus

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    OK, I have a set of expensive kitchen knives that I received as a gift. They are an unknown stainless steel and say "Japanese steel" on one side of the blade and "China" in tiny letters on the other. They appear highly corrision resistant and sharpen decently well though edge retention is lacking a bit. I also have some cheap Henckels and knive from Ikea in stainless.

    Despite being sharpened and stropped to the same 15 degree bevel on a Wicked Edge, I have never been able to get any of the kitchen knives as sharp as the Mora. I am using the same equipment to sharpen, so I am assuming the difference is in the carbon steel on the $12 Mora #2.

    What are the differences in steel that I can take any of the stainless knives, sharpen it the exact same way I sharpen a Mora and still have a duller blade? What is the science behind this?
     
  2. jbkebert

    jbkebert Member

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    Mora's to my understanding have a higher level of carbon than most steels. Also at least some of the mora's are produced with layers of slightly different metals that are folded numerous times. This produces a nice burr on the cutting edge that is more effective.

    John or Sam or Arfin will correct me but that is what I had been told.
     
  3. bikerdoc

    bikerdoc Moderator Staff Member

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  4. heron

    heron Member

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    Sharpness is limited by grain structure (among other factors), and a lot of cheap stainless has coarser grain which cannot take as sharp an edge as a finer-grain steel.
     
  5. Deltaboy1984

    Deltaboy1984 Member

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    Mora' s and TRU - Sharp stamped Old Hickory Kitchen Knives can be honed to being scary Sharp. They have high carbon steel.
     
  6. JimStC

    JimStC Member

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    Doc,
    Thanks for the link. Just printed the 4 page version. My knowledge in steel is sorely lacking. Also thanks to the OP.

    Jim
     
  7. JohnBT

    JohnBT Member

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  8. bikerdoc

    bikerdoc Moderator Staff Member

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    Glad it helped Jim.
    Steel, Blade geometry and hardness of the heat treat (rockwell) are all important in knife selection.
     
  9. JimStC

    JimStC Member

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    Doc,
    Any good sources on the later two topics?
    Thanks a bunch,

    Jim
     
  10. bikerdoc

    bikerdoc Moderator Staff Member

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    Jim, Start withe stickie by Joe Talmidge at the top of NFW and go from there
     
  11. JimStC

    JimStC Member

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    Thanks Doc. Will do.

    Jim
     
  12. Spec ops Grunt

    Spec ops Grunt Member

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    In my experience Scandi Grinds are always scary sharp.
     
  13. Madcap_Magician

    Madcap_Magician Member

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    Thin blade that's Scandinavian ground is why.
     
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