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1851 Navy & beginner

Discussion in 'Blackpowder' started by 1861, Aug 8, 2017.

  1. Crawdad1

    Crawdad1 Member

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    Hopefully one day you'll come over here and visit some Civil War Battlefields. Possibly Gettysburg.

    One thing to remember about the statues of our mounted Generals at our battlefields, If the horse has all four hooves on the ground the General riding that horse survived the war, if one hoof is raised off the ground then the General was wounded but survived, if two hooves are raised the General was killed during the war but if all four hooves of the horse are off the ground, then the rider is General Robert E Lee.
     
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  2. 1861

    1861 Member

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    :)
     
  3. expat_alaska

    expat_alaska Member

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    Pietta lists their maximum charges that low because they want no litigation against them should someone do something stupid, against their recommendations.

    It is a litigation society these days. Learn to live with it. Lawyers seem to rule the world if anyone seems to be maligned in any way.

    Follow the money, folks.

    Jim
     
  4. expat_alaska

    expat_alaska Member

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    Just my opinion, but I have no idea why you EU folks like the shiny silver versions versus the original blued and brass original Colts produced in the US nor their Italian replicas. Samuel Colt produced his 1851 Navy revolvers in his London factory with silver plated brass backstraps and trigger guards for that reason: because they would sell.

    By your terminology "the black and chrome" version is actually a blued barrel, blued engraved cylinder, color-cased steel frame with the trigger guard and backstrap silver plated. Please do not confuse "chrome" with the silver plating.It is not the same.

    Original Dance revolvers were primarily .44 caliber, but some were historically produced in .36 caliber. I wish that Pietta would produce a Dance .36 as it would be an easy fit to interchange other Pietta parts. As I have stated before, the Pietta Dance .44 is based on a slightly modified 1851 Navy frame and has a larger diameter cylinder than the 1851 Navy .36 cylinder. If Pietta would produce a Dance .36 on the 1851 frame, all they would have to do is mill off the recoil shields, and either case color or blue the frame. Either option would be acceptable to me.

    Your alternative Robert E. Lee .44 is not acceptable to me as no original 1851 Navies were produced in .44 caliber, especially with the rebated cylinder and the cut water table to fit. Your call, sir.
     
  5. 1861

    1861 Member

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    That's why I wrote "downside is that it's only in .44 and I would rather have .36" - because I KNOW that the original 1851s were .36 - so we feel the same there.

    I can't speak for the rest of 743 millions of Europeans, but me, myself & I like silver. Matter of personal tastes. All my vintage audio gear is silver too, not black :cool:
     
  6. drobs

    drobs Member

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  7. 1861

    1861 Member

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  8. 1861

    1861 Member

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    I plan that... unfortunatelly, there is never enough money and time in a man's life to realise all the plans.
     
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  9. Crawdad1

    Crawdad1 Member

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    I was in Europe during the seventies while in the Navy visiting several countries. Beautiful countries, Italy, France, Spain, Greece, plus some others. If you visit and want a good experience then come over the first couple of days in July while they, Federal Park Rangers, have the Battlefield Walks at Gettysburg. They'll explain the entire battlefield and battle. Plus the re-enactors are always there and they are very helpful.

    Hope you make it. :)
     
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  10. 1861

    1861 Member

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    I just hope that they won't try to explain me how that body at the Devil's Den wasn't actualy a Confederate sharpshooter :)
     
  11. Crawdad1

    Crawdad1 Member

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    I think you've possibly seen those battlefield walks already. Still a lot to be learned about that battle. We're still finding written material in the archives that pertain to that battle. Almost every day we are getting a clearer image of what happened.
     
  12. 1861

    1861 Member

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    I've seen films, documentaries, photos and articles. I don't think anyone from Europe knows more about it than me :)
     
  13. BCRider

    BCRider Member

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    We can trip over little notes from the ACW in the oddest of places. I was wandering through a graveyard in Edinburgh Scotland that was up near the top of Holy Rood park and came upon a memorial to some Scots that packed up and went over to join up. I can only surmise that some of them had altruistic thoughts about fighting to abolish slavery while others may have had some family ties to boys already joined up. But the inscription implied that it was a goodly number that made this trip. And it would seem that at least a few of them returned and paid for the monument to be carved and placed.
     
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  14. 1861

    1861 Member

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    Last edited: Aug 12, 2017
  15. drobs

    drobs Member

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    I use a plastic mallet but that wood one is nifty.

    One of my 2 Pietta 1860 Army's has a real stiff barrel wedge. I made tool for it out of a piece of 5.56x45 (.223) brass crushed in a vice. Works real good for the purpose.

    27389861666_f5cd5fd3e3_z.jpg


    Tool in your last link is a ball starter for a muzzle loading rifle. You don't need that for a revolver.

    Strangely enough I just bought one of those to go with a Lyman Great Plains rifle that I ordered today.
    https://www.muzzle-loaders.com/rifl...s/lymantm-great-plains-rifle-left-handed.html
     
  16. expat_alaska

    expat_alaska Member

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    I am cheap. I use a scrap piece of 1" x 2" x 6" wood lengthwise against the wedge and use a steel ball-peen hammer on the end of the wood. A quick sharp rap with the hammer loosens/tightens the wedge, unless Guido the Pietta Gorilla installed it new and this the first time you tried to move the wedge. Oil is your friend.

    If the tip of the wedge spring does not protrude fully on the right side of the frame when new, I lightly sand (fine grit paper) the front and back sides of the wedge until I get a good fit. Piettas are good insofar as arbor length fit into the barrel lug arbor recess is concerned, so one need not be concerned about the depth of the wedge to adjust the cylinder-to-barrel forcing cone gap. Uberti owners sometimes suggest this, but it is nonsense and is poor gunsmithing practice.

    Don't take my word for it. Ask Mike the professional:

    http://www.goonsgunworks.com/

    Jim
     
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  17. rodwha

    rodwha Member

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    I'd not buy a wooden mallet as it will slowly get chewed by the wedge.
     
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  18. Crawdad1

    Crawdad1 Member

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    That's what I do also use a sliver of wood and any hammer that is available. If I have to use the loading lever to ease the barrel off the arbor I place that sliver of wood in front of the cylinder in between the rammer and the cylinder face so the rammer doesn't scar it.

    I only had to do that on Second and Third generation Colts because they are so tight on that arbor.
     
    Last edited: Aug 12, 2017
  19. rodwha

    rodwha Member

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    Certainly don't want to scare our revolvers! We need them to be bold and not flinch! :rofl:
     
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  20. Crawdad1

    Crawdad1 Member

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    Oh crap, I'll fix it.

    Thanks!! :)
     
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  21. 1861

    1861 Member

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  22. Malachi Leviticus Blue

    Malachi Leviticus Blue Member

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  23. 1861

    1861 Member

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  24. Tommygunn

    Tommygunn Member

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    I use a plastic tipped hammer I bought in a hardware store 25+ years ago, and it's still good.
     
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  25. rodwha

    rodwha Member

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