44 special +P vs 357 mag for hunting

Discussion in 'Handguns: Revolvers' started by trekker73, Jul 31, 2022.

  1. Smaug

    Smaug Member

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    The difference is that you KNOW a 44 Magnum handgun can handle any load between 44 Special for a 100 year old gun in that chambering and full house Magnum loads for a modern gun.

    By the way, is the gun in the zebra shot an AMT AutoMag?! Sweet!
     
  2. .38 Special

    .38 Special Member

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    Granted - but then, we know which .44 Specials can handle 1100-1200 FPS loads because there is a tremendous body of experience out there. (Most of us, BTW, treat the 240 and 250 grain bullets as nearly interchangeable. There's not an animal alive that can tell the difference, and I certainly cannot tell a difference in either recoil or trajectory.)

    Personally, I prefer hunting with the Special simply because it is less gun to tote around all day.
     
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  3. CraigC
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    CraigC Sixgun Nut

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    I also know that a .44Spl can handle a .44Spl load. It ain't rocket science and it's only been done for 100yrs.
     
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  4. Smaug

    Smaug Member

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    ...but we're not TALKING about 44 Special loads. (unless I misunderstood the OP?) We're talking about pushing it so it's suitable for hunting.

    I guess if he has a 44 Special, my 44 Magnum option may not be an option. He's talking about limiting his shots to 50 yards for the rainbow trajectory vs. using a .357.

    You point out that 44 Special is already big and you don't need to depend on expansion. I would counter that .357 moves out so fast that expansion is not questionable.

    Anyway, try not to get too .... PASSIONATE about it. It's a 1st world question, after all.
     
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  5. .38 Special

    .38 Special Member

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    The concern is that once you have expansion, you might not have adequate penetration, because the bullet weight just isn't there.

    As for trajectory... Revolver bullets, with few exceptions, fly like bricks. A .357 158 grain bullet at 1250 fps is going to drop about seven to seven and a half inches at 100 yards. A .429 bullet at 1100 fps is going to drop about eight and a half to nine inches at the same distance. I doubt there has ever been a man who can hold a revolver for two inches at 100 yards. Trajectory, for normal revolver cartridges in normal situations, is simply not a worthwhile consideration.
     
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  6. CraigC
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    CraigC Sixgun Nut

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    We are talking about a .44Spl load and one that has been in use for nearly 100yrs. We know the loads, we know the pressures involved, we know what guns to use for them. No different than "Ruger only" .45Colt loads. This is a well beaten path, replete with asphalt and street lights.

    Trajectory difference is a total non-issue to 50yds. It may come into play if you pushed it to 100 but not with the Keith load.

    Relying on expansion is ALWAYS questionable. Bullets fail, it happens all the time. The .357 also limits your shot opportunities because that expansion comes at a cost, penetration. A .44 Keith bullet or similar LBT design will penetrate end to end on any deer that walks. The .357 with expanding bullets should be limited to broadside, double lung shots with no shoulders involved.

    Do not attempt to moderate my responses.


    I meant to reply to this before. People say that because they've heard it. In the real world, there's little or no difference. I will say this, the .41 is probably a better choice for hunting deer sized game. You accomplish the same thing with less recoil. Where the.44 shines over the .41 is with heavier bullets on larger critters.


    The Seyfried/Bowen #13 was their attempt to build an MOA revolver. It's a .475 with an extensively modified frame, browned damascus barrel, English rose & scroll engraving and stocked in ivory. It's one of the most expensive custom revolvers I've ever seen. They accomplished their goal, as Ross did shoot 1" groups at 100yds with it. I'm sure there are plain few shooters capable of this. Especially with iron sights!!!

    Seyfried%20num13.jpg
     
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  7. Barbaroja

    Barbaroja Member

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    Yes sir well past experimentation. It’s interesting to see some people’s way of thinking being stuck inside the box of the ballistics charts on a box of factory ammo.
    More fun for us I guess.
    9C1EBA03-4FD6-4830-8BF4-85CC9C57920C.jpeg
     
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  8. CraigC
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    CraigC Sixgun Nut

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    Bingo!
     
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  9. .38 Special

    .38 Special Member

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    You are correct, but I had field positions in mind when I wrote that...

    As an aside, are you sure that he shot MOA with No.13? I know he had Bowen build him a revolver with which he was able to shoot 1" groups, but that was with a scope. If I recall correctly, in the article (G&A?) concerning that gun, he laughed at the idea of making MOA with iron sights.
     
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  10. CraigC
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    CraigC Sixgun Nut

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    It was with #13. Because I remember being shocked.
     
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  11. dickydalton

    dickydalton Member

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    The first deer I shot with this was at 85 yards in 1989. I had a Leupold M8 2X on a Buhler clamp mount on it back then. It's one of the first 629 no dash revolvers. I shot it so much with hot loads that it got a rebuild once and is very close to needing another. I don't shoot it much anymore but it looks nice with the elk stags in a Simply Rugged 120 now at bar bar b q's.
     
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  12. savagelover

    savagelover Member

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    So where did the bullet go in the air?
     
  13. d2wing

    d2wing Member

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    At a military range. I didn't think of that at the time. All the practice was done with bb guns without sights
     
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