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66 Years Ago Today - Iwo Jima

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by doc540, Feb 19, 2011.

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  1. txhoghunter

    txhoghunter Member

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    We owe who we are today to the "Greatest Generation"! Their sacrifices, courage, and commitment to this country and the world make ALL of them heroes.

    Even though we are losing these men and women, we will never forget what they accomplished, and what it cost for them to achieve the impossible.

    They make me proud to be an American!
     
  2. ultradoc

    ultradoc Member

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    God Bless them guys. Some folks don't know but the famous flag raising pic on Mt. Saribachi[?] is the second time the flag was raised.
     
  3. doc540

    doc540 Member

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    Wife's father was there. He was always proud to have lasted 5 days there, and would always keep reading books about that battle. His company got to run across the runway and attack 'the citadel'. (company L) The Japs kept killing all the ammo carriers and they had to run back across. Jap machine guns and snipers everywhere. Told me also a little about Pelilu, but said Iwo was 'hard'. I guess if you consider Pelilu 'normal' 20% KIA and 60% WIA, 'hard' is straight suicide.

    Has he passed on now or is he still with us?
     
  4. Lonestar49

    Lonestar49 Member

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    God bless them all

    ...

    ~ SALUTE ~


    Ls usa.gif
     
  5. xfyrfiter

    xfyrfiter Member

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    A great big THANK YOU yo all our vets past and present. If not for them we wouldn't have the freedoms we have today.
     
  6. Sport45

    Sport45 Member

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    I knew that. But it's still a great picture that inspired a nation. A picture of the first flag raising probably wouldn't have had the same effect although it would have been historically accurate.

    Was the picture ever depicted to be the "first"?
     
  7. rocky branch

    rocky branch Member

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    Small point-but to say those guys were ASKED is just plain wrong.
    Heard it before, do not know how it came into use.

    Many were drafted-later all were PUT on landing craft and TOLD to get off and go get 'em.


    I did 4 years, 66-70 with 18 months in the bush in RVN.
    Don't recall ever being asked to do anything.
    I was ordered to report for a draft physical.
     
  8. doc540

    doc540 Member

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    "Small point-but to say those guys were ASKED is just plain wrong."

    VERY small point.

    Might want to read about Pfc Desmond Doss, MOA.
     
  9. Nushif

    Nushif Member

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    As inspiring as this is .. I really don't see this as being gun related.

    Now before you call me un-American, thank you I have seven years of time in service and I'm going strong and I take my oaths very seriously.

    I understand the sentiment a lot, but the usage of old slurs and the like and of the constant ongoing about one particular generation being the "greatest generation" is a bit inane.

    They're not Japs, they're Japanese. Japanese Soldiers, to be exact. And the greatest Generation had its fair share of PTSD, disfunctional returns and the like as well.

    In any case, it's good to remember. But we can't plant seeds with our fists. And rhetoric like that doesn't serve anyone.
     
  10. SalchaketJoe

    SalchaketJoe Member

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    In 1999 I was scheduled to go to Iwo Jima for a day. I was on the second of two flights. My friend went on the first and mine got cancelled. Wish I could of gone. My grandfather was in either the 82nd or 101st airbourne during WW2 and made 3 combat jumps including Normandy. My other grandfather was on the Ploesti raid in a B24. Thank God such men lived.
     
  11. crossrhodes

    crossrhodes Member

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    Nushif

    No slur intended. Don't understand the rest of your comment. Why you so down on America.
     
  12. MarkDozier

    MarkDozier Member.

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    What the heck did they fight with??? GUNS, GUNS and more GUNS and they were Japs and krauts and limeies and frogs, yanks, white eyed devils. Put you political correctness away. The names, nicknames, slurs are part of historical accuracy.
    By the you way in Japan are still Gungi (SP??)i! Go look that up you white eyed devil.
     
  13. Kaeto

    Kaeto Member

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    Spelling is 'Gaijin' . Roughly translated it means Barbarian.
     
  14. buck460XVR

    buck460XVR Member

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    They were called and still are the "Greatest Generation" because virtually any male of fighting age was involved somehow militarily. Exception maybe being the youngest son at home on the farm. Still, even most of them ''volunteered". Not only was it the troops that served from that generation, but the families and spouses of those troops also served in supply type roles by leaving the farm to build ships and make ammo or to work in the VA hospitals. They rationed their gas and food, while turning in any metal item that was not absolutely necessary, to be recycled and used in the war effort. This great of sacrifice by a NATION of people has never been repeated since.


    Yes they did, and with the atrocities they experienced in such great numbers on both the European and Pacific Theaters, it stands to reason. But for the most part, they came home and dealt with it themselves. It was know as "Battle Fatigue", and most of them(and their families) found a way to live with it. They didn't run to the VA and want a disability check and some "happy pills", they were just happy to be home and alive. Same with minor disabilities. Most of those that came home with those, were too proud to ask for anything. Too many of them felt guilty coming home at all in that condition instead of like their buddies, in a box.
     
  15. crossrhodes

    crossrhodes Member

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    What 460 said!!..

    That was well put. Yes it was a NATION that made a sacrifice, they supported the Nation and took pride in doing it. It was Rosie the Riveter and not "gett'en it real" with some Jersey Shore crap and abuse of hair gel.
     
  16. doc540

    doc540 Member

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    Oh, good grief. I put "gun related" in quotation marks so the moderators could make whatever call they wanted.

    And they made a good call.

    If anything, your hypersensitivity is more off topic than anything yet posted in my thread and serves less of a purpose.

    They're "Japs" and "Nips" and we're "Yanks".

    It's short for "Japanese" and "Nipponese" and "Yankees".

    None of the three is a slur unless one is looking to accuse someone of racism.

    And, please, save us the patronizing lecture about how to best plant seeds. This is the wrong thread for that.

    This thread is for remembering and honoring the Americans who fought the battle of Iwo Jima.
     
  17. Nushif

    Nushif Member

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    Alright, let's set some things straight here.

    I have lost some family in WW2 as well. To be exact ... my great grandfather. Because of the war, I never even knew him. He was in the Luftwaffe.

    I am fresh off the boat (ten years ago) from Germany and have retained at least a small amount of outside perspective. If I recall correctly, we do indeed have some non americans on this board.

    Now, how would for instance any of you feel if I posted something along those lines about the Battle of Verdun. Promptly someone else hops on and says "Good shootin' Wehrmacht."

    ... Need I go further? Need I remind you folks that this is the high road ... and of the fact that there is a pretty darned good chance that we have some people on this very board whose great grandfather, or even father died in Word War II as well. In the Japanese Imperial Army.

    I know I don't appreciate being called a Kraut by some random stranger. I know you don't appreciate coming to the UK and being called a Yank. Where do you think it's ok to do it to others coming here?

    This has nothing to do with thin skin. I've had much worse dished out by people less eloquent or rather "bad language" avoiding than anywhere here. But never under the heading of the High Road.
     
  18. crossrhodes

    crossrhodes Member

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    America

    This is AMERICA....It is a culture that you let get off the boat and live a life of freedom...your price of admission. Love the country, the flag and our history. America allows you to come here and practice your faith and express your feelings and opinion with the freedom of speech. It is not meant to suppress the AMERICAN way of life and turn us into the country you were escaping from to begin with. :fire:
     
  19. longdayjake

    longdayjake Member

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    Though I am usually against name calling of any kind, I have absolutely no problem with people using slurs to refer to people that they are killing during war time. One way to mentally deal with what soldiers are given to deal with is to dehumanize the enemy. Heck I could care less about people calling me a Yank. Who cares? Being proud of your fighting men and remembering them for what they did and said and were is more important than offending a few people by using language from those days. A name is just a name and its your choice on how it makes you feel. The only person that is offended is the one that chooses to be.
     
  20. crossrhodes

    crossrhodes Member

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    Oh my GOD

    I guess i should of been highly offended when a swabbie called me a jar head and vice verse.... I must of missed the sensitivity training.:what:
     
  21. doc540

    doc540 Member

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    Yeah, too bad we couldn't stay on topic and just honor our service men and women during the Iwo Jima campaign.

    So.....

    Proud to be called a "Yank".

    Proud of my neighbor, Ray Hudson, for his sacrifice and service on Iwo Jima.

    Proud of everyone who contributed to the U.S. war effort in WWII.

    And after defeating two, racist, totalitarian regimes hell bent on world domination, proud to be called "victor".:)
     
  22. Sam1911

    Sam1911 Moderator Emeritus

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    Threads like this are a tough subject here. Military history is not clearly "on-topic" unless the actual subject has to do with the firearms used.

    ("Well, they were fighting with GUNS...", doesn't cut it, by the way. :rolleyes:)

    We do usually allow a brief "remembrance" thread on anniversaries such as this, but we cannot allow debate threads about the battles or the actions of the soldiers involved.

    ... Having said that, I'll close with the following:

    I've come to perceive the fighting man on all sides of every conflict as having a certain honor, a spirit of self-sacrifice for his country and comrades, and other highly admirable qualities. Soldiers are called to do terrible, horrible things, not (as a whole) because they are terrible, horrible humans, but because they sacrifice their own desires, ethics and morals (to some degree), and even lives in the service of their country.

    Few things warm my heart as much as seeing American Veterans meeting German Veterans to embrace and remember on the shores of Normandy, or Vietnamese and Americans revisiting the battlefields on which they faced each other. Or Japanese, Korean, etc. To dishonor any of them, now, would be unthinkable. And "un-American" if anything ever could be.
     
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