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Ammunition storage location

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by red_cedar, Dec 1, 2008.

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  1. red_cedar

    red_cedar Member

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    I have been getting some slack lately about where I am storing my ammunition. There are expressed fears of the house blowing up.

    I probably have all told in a combination of 12 gauge, 7.62x39, .308. 9mm,
    40 S&W. about 10,000+ rds I keep in the basement on a wood pallet.
    Not as much some but more then others.

    Where do you guys keep your ammunition.
     
  2. kingpin008

    kingpin008 Member

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    Why would the house "blow up" because of where you're storing your ammo?

    I mean, unless you're storing it in the fireplace with a fire burning, I'd imagine you're pretty safe. And even then, ammo doesn't "blow up", it burns.

    But because you asked, I store my ammo in my bedroom, within reach of my bed.
     
  3. 7.62Reaper

    7.62Reaper member

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    Why don't you store it in your bomb shelter?
     
  4. Highland Ranger

    Highland Ranger Member

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    only 10,000 rounds? don't you have a coffee table you can use?

    kidding aside, house isn't going to blow up. store in a dry place
     
  5. NAK

    NAK Member

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    My worry is about spreading out the weight loading on the floor...I live in a 4th floor apartment. :D

    Shotgun shells under the bed (12 cases fits nicely)

    Spam cans of CMP 30-06 in the kitchen cabinets.

    The rest spread out between a couple of closets in wheeled storage boxes.
     
  6. 22-rimfire

    22-rimfire Member

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    10,000 rounds weight something like 66 lbs. Not enough to concern yourself with no matter where you store it.

    I use a metal cabinet and a closet to store my ammunition.
     
  7. CU74

    CU74 Member

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    I have the advantage of living in a rural area, so my ammo storage options are better than most. We don't worry about explosions, but I am a little uneasy about keeping too much in the basement. Fire department folk tend to get a bit shy when they hear rounds cooking off, but since the nearest fire station is about ten miles away, we may not have that to worry about.............

    We keep a few rifles, shotguns and a small amount - probably less than two thousand rounds - in the reinforced concrete "safe room" in the basement, (Kansas - tornadoes) . Most of our ammunition, (several thousand rounds) is kept in the shop area of a separate building. Reloading supplies, including many pounds of powder and several thousand primers, are also in the shop.

    We don't consider the rest of our ammo to be "in storage". That would include the two boxes sitting on my desk, (unloaded revolver in a drawer) the two loaded magazines on top of the bookcase, (for the rifle in the corner) the loose rounds and loaded mags in my bureau in the walk-in closet, (two handguns there) the loaded magazines in the bag with the semi-auto pistol in the linen closet. (There is also the ammo that is in the two revolvers, a semi-auto pistol and a pump shotgun in our bedroom.)
     
  8. Calibre44

    Calibre44 Member

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    Well over here all centrefire ammunition must be kept in a locked gunsafe (in a separate lockable compartment within it) or in an ammo safe. Black Powder has to be stored in an approved wooden compartmentalised box secured to the fabric of the house.

    Reloading equipment, primers, powder, cases and bullets can be left anywhere in the house – ammo has to locked away when assembled.

    The irony with our gun laws is that shotgun ammo doesn’t have to be locked away and can be stored anywhere in the house so long as it is out of the reach of children – that’s because it isn’t as dangerous.:rolleyes:
     
  9. red_cedar

    red_cedar Member

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    I'm not worried about it. If I had reloading equipment and supplies that would be differnt.
    All I have been hearing from significant other is about everyone being killed. It was her idea to post this question.
    This all started when I was asked what I wanted for christmas, ammunition was on the list and the issue with what was in the basement came up.

    I figure if there is a fire, the basement will be the last to go, presuming a fire starts upstairs.
     
    Last edited: Dec 2, 2008
  10. Mannlicher

    Mannlicher Member

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    I store ammo in a couple of Stack On style barrel key safes. I frame them up inside with 1x1 pine, install shelves, and fill them up. :)
     
  11. knockonit

    knockonit Member

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    ammo

    I keep all mine in a 20ft container on the back half of lot, also is home to quite a collection of Milsurps I've collected over the years, it also contains a couple safes for the small stuff.
    Here in Az. humidity isn't a problem very often, so storage is pretty easy.
    happy holidays.
     
  12. Highland Ranger

    Highland Ranger Member

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    Ammo in a fire pops - NOT what Hollywood shows you. That may be the source of her concern. Without a barrel the projectile can't develop velocity. So if, God forbid, there is a fire in your house, it won't be like a division of marines firing at you. As noted below, there are other common household items that are far more dangerous.

    Excerpt from: http://www.cartridgecollectors.org/faq.htm

    SAAMI has a publication on ammo in a fire: http://www.saami.org/Publications.cfm

    50 cents if you want to spring for it.
     
  13. Quinbus

    Quinbus Member

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    They recently did an episode of Mythbusters where they tested the effects of storing your ammo in an oven at 400 degrees (a science project I wish i had thought of in the third grade :) ). The rounds eventually popped; the bullets did not have enough energy to break through the oven glass.

    Until they tested a chambered round...
     
  14. Farnorthdan

    Farnorthdan Member

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    ^^^^You beat me to it....I thought everyone watched mythbusters:rolleyes:

    The only round that did any damage to the stove used for cooking off was the .50BMG and if I remember right it only cracked the glass on the door when it cooded off....



    DS
     
  15. jbauch357

    jbauch357 Member

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    I keep my supplies in .30 and .50 cal ammo cans in a closet, clearly marked on the outside with the type and quantity. Each can also has multiple cardboard wafers that emit a rust prohibitive ozone - just to make sure if any moisture somehow found it's way into the cans it wouldn't cause any damage. With multiple types and calibers, there is probably 200-300 lbs of ammo in the closet - but it's spread out more than a large person's weight would be if they were standing there so I'm not worried. The gun safe on the other hand - I am a little worried about...
     
  16. KBintheSLC

    KBintheSLC Member

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    It's not going to happen. Loaded ammo is safe and it will not explode all at once in a fire. It will burn and you might hear rounds popping, but without being in a chamber, the bullets will just pop out with almost no velocity. The entire stack will not blow up like some kind of bomb. The physics and chemistry of the situation will not facilitate that.
     
  17. pinstripe

    pinstripe Member

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    I keep mine stored in ammo cans and those cans are stored in my workshop under lock and key.
     
  18. 7.62X25mm

    7.62X25mm member

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    "Getting some slack" means "being tolerated."
     
  19. red_cedar

    red_cedar Member

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    Getting some slack to me means 'kind of a hard time.'
     
  20. 357Opus

    357Opus Member

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  21. WardenWolf

    WardenWolf member

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    That video pretty much covers it. In the case of a loaded firearm in a fire, the only round that can even possibly go bang is the one in the chamber, and even then it's unlikely.

    There is maybe one ammo type I know of that could pose a threat, and only because it is so unusual: the 7.62 Nagant cartridge. The bullet is actually set back into the cartridge, behind a crimp, and uses the cartridge itself as part of the barrel. Because of this unusual setup, there IS the possibility of this cartridge cooking off with enough force to do some damage. However, it's uncommon enough that I really don't think you need to worry about it.
     
  22. novaDAK

    novaDAK Member

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    I keep all my boxed ammo in a cabinet next to the safe. I could run a lock and chain though the handles but don't see the point. No little kids around, and the guns (that aren't being carried) are unloaded and stored in the safe. I have a few ammo cans full of loose range ammo and some unopened cases of ammo beside the cabinet 'cause its too heavy and won't fit in there.
     
  23. hso

    hso Moderator Staff Member

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    Unless you are storing black powder or very large quantities of primers you're house won't blow up due to ammo cooking off in a fire. Doesn't happen. We've had this discussion many times before and the firefighters who've responded debunk this myth.
     
    Last edited: Dec 3, 2008
  24. Coronach

    Coronach Moderator Emeritus

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    Sounds like a corruption of "cutting some slack" (giving someone a break) and "getting some static" (which means being griped at a little).

    In any event, no, the ammo won't blow up. It won't even burn in a manner that is particularly dangerous, unless you're standing in the middle of the fire while it is cooking off. Then you might have your eye put out- but you'd have bigger problems, because you'd be standing in the middle of a fire. ;) I assure you that you have a bazillion other things in your house that are orders of magnitude more dangerous than a palletful of loaded ammuntion. Some of them might be in your significant other's hair care shelf in the bathroom (cans of hairspray? *WHOOSH*)

    I think the main reason firefighters are cautions around ammo cooking off is that they don't know what else is there. If there's ammo, there might be a gun. If there's a gun, it might be loaded (THAT is a cook-off hazard worth worrying about). Or, there could be large cannisters of smokeless powder (major deflagration hazard), or lots of primers (explosion hazard), or a big cannister of your favorite smokeless powder for your muzzleloader (run away!)

    Mike
     
  25. tank mechanic

    tank mechanic Member

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    All that poor ammo defenseless ammo! Make them stop! :eek:

    Pretty cool video though.
     
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