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As a new hunter, what's the basic gear I need

Discussion in 'Hunting' started by gfanikf, Jan 4, 2012.

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  1. gfanikf

    gfanikf Member

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    With Cabelas having end of hunting seasons sales what should I get? I'm trying to figure out what essential clothing and gear (besides a tree stand) I should get now in preparation for next fall (or even the late spring hunting seasons).

    As of the moment this is the only thing I can think of (or pick for certain). I figure it covers any blaze regs I'll have to meet (at least after reading over the PA digest yesterday).

    http://www.cabelas.com/product/Brow...owning+blaze&WTz_l=Header;Search-All+Products

    I have about $100-$150 to spend right now. One thing I know I need is new boots, but don't factor that into the cost considerations as I may be getting it as a gift from someone.

    Regarding coats, actually just got this coat as a gift. Now before anyone says anything, it was massively on sale. So the price wasn't what's listed there. http://www1.macys.com/shop/product/hawke...-xx.esn_results

    I have to say standing on the platform at the Hamilton Train Station the last few days and getting in the car before the heat kicks on, the coat has performed great (it was around 15 degrees this morning). Any chance I could just use it then or should I get a coat I don't mind getting dinged up? Perhaps I could combo it with a cover up?

    Thanks!
     
  2. Bobson

    Bobson Member

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    You'll want to be certain it meets any blaze requirements you'll have placed on you. Figuring isn't going to cut it.

    Regarding your boots, heed Rule #1 of Walking/Hiking/Marching: Never wear low quality footwear.

    I also suggest you invest in a quality Camelbak that you fill with water while hunting.

    I'll let the others add to the other gear you'll want and/or need. Gonna need to take notes here, myself.
     
  3. somoss

    somoss Member

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    what kind of hunting? what animal? what weapon? what season? what will you PA hunt area be like? how much walking? climbing? any water to cross?
    as far as clothes, i am sure you have what you need. dress in layers, blaze on the outside. thin gloves, hot hands in pockets for when its real cold.
    buy the most boot you can afford. buy the most sock you can afford (i was amazed how much more comfortable $10 socks were compared to cheap crew socks).

    insualted bibs are great but not needed. face mask, great but not needed.
     
  4. gfanikf

    gfanikf Member

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    I double checked the amount Cabela lists in their Q&A with PA's 2010-2011 Hunter Trapper digest and it exceeds the amount by nearly 200 units (I forget the measurement unit off hand)

    That's why I held off getting boots over the holiday as I wanted to make sure I got a quality pair (heck the last pair I have is from when I was in High School and must be nearly 11 years old.


    Apologies I should have been more specific. It might be for Turkey in the spring, but the primary purpose would be for Deer, with a NEF Pardner Pump Action Protector Shotgun (I just need to know which new barrel to get with H&R), Deer Season is Late Fall/Early Winter (Nov-December),the area of PA is Bucks County (http://www.portal.state.pa.us/portal/server.pt?open=514&objID=619923&mode=2) which is 5C on the map. I can't comment otherwise on terrain at the moment. There is a small chance it might also be in Chambersburg, PA (http://www.portal.state.pa.us/porta...nagement/wildlife_management_units/wmu5a.html) which is 5A. I can't comment on the terrain again.

    Thanks, I'd love to keep it on the low end as it's easy to get into mall ninja hunter mode with so many options. My main goals for the first time are safety, warmth, and mobility. If I can use as much of my regular clothes as possible, so much the better!
     
  5. Gunnerboy

    Gunnerboy Member

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    Basics? hmm .... well how bout A firearm and some ammo and maybe a license :D
     
  6. gfanikf

    gfanikf Member

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    I'm taking the HTE course in March. I have a shotgun (NEF Pardner Pump Action Protector), but getting a new barrel for that is a bit of a process and I was going to do a separate thread (here or the shotgun section) to figure out which one(s) to get.
    http://www.hr1871.com/Support/accessoryProgram.asp
     
  7. brnmuenchow

    brnmuenchow Member

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    A quality firearm, a really good scope (can't stress that one enough), a great pair of boots, and a way to hump the animal back to camp--this one depends also on location of the hunt too many variables can play into that one like distance to camp or terrain involved.
    Also as a new hunter always remember to double check if your gun is sighted in before you leave to the field. :)
     
  8. Doug S

    Doug S Member

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    A good hunting knife, and a bone saw if you plan to do some deer hunting. A lot of people will tell you that you don't need to split the pelvis or the sternum on a deer, but I find it much easier to dress a deer having done so. Being a new hunter, you might find it beneficial also. You don't want to bust a bladder full of urine on your deer meet, and splitting the pelvis helps to avoid this IMO. Here is what I use...

    [​IMG]
    I use the Buck 110 at top, but I may give the 112 bottom a try next season.

    [​IMG]
    Gerber EZ Saw does a nice job of cutting through pelvis and sternum, and is designed for the purpose, so there is less chance of cutting things you don't want to cut. Sheathed, the 3.5in bladed Gerber EZ saw is only slightly longer than the cased Buck 110. Also, it weighs next to nothing. Both easily fit on a belt or fanny pack.

    Both of these are good tools for the job, and you can get both for only around $45 total.
     
    Last edited: Jan 4, 2012
  9. T Bran

    T Bran Member

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    I dont turkey hunt much but the guys that do seem to use either a ground blind or really decent cammo. As for deer dont go too crazy on cammo as it is really not needed and will be under the blaze orange anyway. I hunt in insulated bluejeans and whatever shirts and jackets are at hand. Like anything else layer up so you can take stuff off as necessary.
    A decent pair of binoculars are very nice to have and I'll second the Camelback as it has lots of pockets to store all the small items and munchies as well. If stand hunting a fall protection vest/harness is a must the easier and more comphy the better. The ones that come with most stands work but are a PITA to put on this lessens the chance that you will use them. I didnt see the point in this till I fell out of a stand for the first time after 20 years of hunting out of them. Luckily it was a 12ft leaner and not my climber. When buying a stand keep the weight in mind depending on how far you may have to carry it.
    Good Hunting.
     
  10. waffentomas

    waffentomas Member

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    I'd say to be wary of shopping at Cabelas or any other retailer, if your funds are very limited. Cabelas bargain cave can be good, but that's about it.

    Try a Ross, TJ Maxx or Marshalls for some layering stuff. Ebay's prices are always better than any retail store, often even better than TJ Maxx type stores.

    With funds limited, don't be shy about trying out Goodwill or Value Village type stores. I've found some useful items there.

    You can compensate for just about any gear/clothing deficiency one way or another, but you shouldn't skimp on boots and socks.

    Good luck and have fun. I have all the crap I'll ever need...I miss 'hunting' for hunting gear.
     
  11. Art Eatman

    Art Eatman Administrator Staff Member

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    If you need the blaze orange, one of the highway worker's vests might well do, and they're cheap.

    El cheapo clothing from Goodwill, generally earth tones, and select such that you can layer to deal with varying temperatures. Camo helps when you're hunting birds, but it's totally unnecessary for deer, coyotes and suchlike.

    Gun? Most any good used bolt action from a pawn shop will work, as long as it's not all scuffy and beat up. Most are not. :) In general, the pawnshop won't have much over half of the asking price invested in the rifle, so bargain down as hard as you can. Any of the so-called "deer cartridges" are as good as any other, but stay away from magnums.

    Knife? The main thing is one which you can easily sharpen. You sure don't need more than a three- to four-inch blade length. I mostly use an old Solingen folding pocket knife that my father brought back in 1945. I just tap with a rock on the back of the blade to split the pelvis when field-dressing a deer.

    Boots? If where you hunt is pretty much dry country in the season, I'd go with Russell Bird Hunters or Red Wing Twenty-Mile. They're not cheap, but mine have lasted for over twenty years. Resoled a few times, but still good. Wet country, or snow? Not my deal, so I'm no help there.

    Over all, the KISS principle works quite well.
     
  12. somoss

    somoss Member

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    KISS. agree 100%. Don't waste $1 on scent control product of any kind. Use the wind. Goodwill for camo/bdu's and under layers. Good luck.
     
  13. LoonWulf

    LoonWulf Member

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    My personal hunting set up it is simple, since i dont have to deal with cold weather. Decent back pack, best quality (that you can afford) shoes/boots, REAL surplus BDUs if you can find them (They tend to be tougher then most comercial stuff), or what ever you can find that fits and is comfortable. I like to carry as many as 4 knives (mostly small, i usually have 1 with a 3-4" blade, and the rest are 2-3") as sharpening in the field can be annoying, one thing i get teased for is my flashlight, dosent matter when, or where we go hunting i have one in my bag. Other then water, a small roll of toilet paper, and a decent firearm/bow/hunting implement, I dont carry much more. I keep quite a bit of stuff in my truck so i can change out things before i go tho, if you have areas where youll sit on the ground and wait then i usually toss some kinda small ground cover in my bag, having a wet ass a few miles from your truck can be annoying. Hand cleaner and towls are good to keep in the vehicle, as are snacks and stuff (but alot of that goes without saying :D )
     
  14. KodiakBeer

    KodiakBeer member

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    A topo map and compass.
     
  15. Sav .250

    Sav .250 Member

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    You don`t have any buddies/friends you can talk to about this? :)
     
  16. Art Eatman

    Art Eatman Administrator Staff Member

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    Be helpful or be quiet. Non-negotiable...
     
  17. Skyshot

    Skyshot Member

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    1. A good backpack(big enough to carry extra clothing) 2. A good quality knife. 3. Some good quality rope (20 or 30 ft. in length). 4. A good thermos and water bottle. 5. A small packable 1st aid kit. 6. A packable rainsuit. 7. A firestarter with some tender. 8. A compass and map of area hunted. 9. A good flashlight. IMO these are necessities you need to carry always when going afield. As far as clothing goes, if your budget is limited I would buy mil-surplus BDU's and stuff you can layer with if it's cold. Boot's should be waterproof, peferably gortex. And wool socks and headcover and good gloves. You need to be prepared when deer hunting for all kinds of weather changes. If you got the gear you can tuff it out instead of heading to the truck! If you get these few essentials you'll figure out the other stuff you need after a few hunts.
     
  18. nathan

    nathan Member

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    A good quality hunting boots as you will be trudging on every possible terrain. Rain, water , mud and sand takes a toll . A good camou for the season. And dont forget the bug spray and caladryl ointment for the itchy bites that often happens. And gloves to keep hands warm and protect against thorns (thick underbrushes).
     
    Last edited: Jan 6, 2012
  19. lyrikz

    lyrikz Member

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    What do you guys recommend for boots?? I would like water proof and money isnt to much of an object when it comes to boots. There are just SO many choices.
     
  20. brainwake

    brainwake Member

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    I chose some water proof hiking boots from Academy. The key is how they fit. Mine are just brown...I don't think they need to be camo..its not your feet that they will see.

    I suggest go and try them on, starting with the cheapest first...by they time you try a few on, you will know which ones fit better than others.

    Of course, if money is no object...then go to Bass Pro, or Cabela's..somewhere that has a good selection. But how they fit will make the most difference.
     
  21. Skyshot

    Skyshot Member

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    I would go and try on several pairs and see what feels the best. As a side note, take a pair of wool socks to put on when you try the boots on.
     
  22. interlock

    interlock Member

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    hi,
    my hunting is all done on a tight budget. i really like some of the advice on here about boots and socks especially.... i would like to add that if you have to "tab" or "yomp" any sort of distance to cut your toe nails short and talc your feet.

    I wear gaiters some times... the problem is some of the material can be a bit rustley.

    consider army surplus stores, real tree etc is real nice and real expensive.... those designs are designed to get pound notes out of your wallet. (or dollar bills!).

    The M65 combat jacket in woodland camo is good. Alpefleck aka flecktarn is pretty good. A goretex army surplus jacket is an essential part of my kit.

    Gerber EZ Saw does a nice job of cutting through pelvis and sternum, and is designed for the purpose, so there is less chance of cutting things you don't want to cut. Sheathed, the 3.5in bladed Gerber EZ saw is only slightly longer than the cased Buck 110. Also, it weighs next to nothing. Both easily fit on a belt or fanny pack.

    this is good advice.

    for deer hunting consider getting the gerber ezisaw and ezi zip. as for a knife consider a mora knife. It is best not to use a folder because of all the places bits of blood and flesh can get... it only contaminates your meat. A 4 or 5 inch blade is needed so that you can reach into the chest cavity from the front and cut the aorta etc to allow a good bleed. Orange is a good colour... more dificult to lose.... especialy when it is very nearly dark and you have just Gralloched that buck! a textured handle is also important - this will stop your hand sliding forward onto the blade and give you better control. i have one of the orange ones.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    a decent pair of Binos is very useful. 8 x 42 is a good size. good glass is very expensive indeed... moderate glass is not so bad, bargains can be had at second hand shops etc. If you hunt right you will spend a lot of times with your binos at your eyes.

    Another piece of advice is to always keep your eyes open. If you are in a shooting shop prices will be premium. If you see something fit for purpose in the supermarket... buy it.

    Some latex gloves and anti bacterial wipes are good.
     
  23. Zombiphobia

    Zombiphobia Member

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    a firearm with approrpriate ammunition.
    that is the minimum you need. In terms of equipment, unless you're an archery hunter..

    You don't NEED a knife, but it's better than sharp rocks, so it'd be a good investment.

    It's also a good idea to have a hanging system. it makes butchering your harvest much easier than field dressing and allows for easier bleeding so your meat doesn't taste like burnt feces.

    Clothing... eh, be careful of ultra-violet dyes.


    Scents, if you are legally allowed. Just for god's sake don't cover yourself in estrous doe urine during the rut. You may get closer to a big buck than you wanna.
     
  24. T.A.Sharps

    T.A.Sharps Member

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    All you need is:

    1.Your gun
    2. Knife
    3. Tag

    That is a quote from my Uncle Rebel to me every year I would go deer hunting with him when I was younger. I was always the kid that brought all this extra crap that I couldn't keep track of and didn't need in the end.
     
  25. Peters923

    Peters923 Member

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    Piranta.
     
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