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Best composite stocks??

Discussion in 'Long Gun Accessories and Optics' started by Sniper66, Feb 10, 2018.

  1. Sniper66

    Sniper66 Member

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    Who in your judgment makes the best composite stocks? Certainly Boyd's is the best known wood stock-maker. Recently,I've been looking at composites and see many that run into 100s of dollars. In the past, I refused to consider them given my strong preference for wood. But, they are no longer cheap plastic and some actually look really nice. I spent some time researching and the options are many with technology advancing everyday. So I'm consulting my friends out there in THR land. I'll appreciate your thoughts.
     
  2. Demi-human

    Demi-human Member

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    Manners. They really have a very popular carbon fiber stock, the prs-one. I like their MCS T -twoA. There are several brands that are aluminum that are very neat looking. MasterPiece Arms has a very innovative chassis, just be sure to sit down before you see the prices. :what:


    But, definitely, wood. :thumbup:
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2018
  3. jmr40

    jmr40 Member

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    Companies like McMillan, Brown Precision, MPI, Manners, and Hi-Tech Specialties use laminated layers of either fiberglass or Kevlar cloth to make up the bulk of the stock. This cloth is laminated together with epoxy from the grip up through where the front swivel is attached. The cut out for the action is done with milling machines exactly the same way wood stocks are made. The outer layers of the forend and buttstock have several thin layers of fiberglass or kevlar laminated to form a shell for the exterior of the stock. The inside of those areas are hollow, but filled with foam to deaden sound.

    Kevlar is much lighter, and stiffer than fiberglass. It is also more expensive. Since it has no flex during recoil it CAN be more accurate and lighter. But the stiffness also makes it possible to break a little easier. Not recommended for anything that kicks more than 300 WM.

    Cost of these stocks are in the $500-$600 range with Kevlar at, or slightly over $600. Building them is labor intensive with 3-4 month wait times in many cases. All are of similar quality, it comes down to which stock design you like best. McMillan offers by far the most options to fit a wider variety of rifles and in many different stock styles. Most of their stocks can also be taken out of the box and bolted on. Usually with no fitting. Most of the others need to be put on the action by a skilled gunsmith. Most fiberglass stocks will be in the 30-32 oz range. The kevlar stocks 16-24 oz. A typical wood stock is the same as fiberglass at 30-32 oz just for reference.

    HS-Precision and Bell & Carlson use an aluminum chassis in place of the laminated cloth the better stock makers use. They do use some layers of cloth to form the outer skin of the stock. But the rest of the stock is melted plastic, with chopped up fiberglass (think attic insulation) poured into a mold. There is no machining. Price is in the $275-$400 range. Most of these will weigh 36-40 oz.

    B&C still makes a few with no metal chassis. Those are very poorly constructed and should be avoided. The plastic factory stocks are much tougher. Those with the metal chassis are pretty rugged and can be accurate. But the metal chassis results in a heavier stock that can be chunky and thick through the grip and fore end. I have no problem with them on a rifle intended for target/varmint/tactical shooting where you want a heavy rifle. I don't like them on a general purpose hunting rifle.

    To be honest, most of the factory plastic stocks shoot just fine. I currently have 4 rifles sitting in McMillan Edge stocks made with Kevlar. I like them a lot, but none of the rifles shoot any better now than they did in the factory stocks. They are 1/2 lb lighter, more rugged, and do look and feel a lot better. I have some other rifles sitting in cheap plastic stocks that shoot every bit as good. Just don't look as good.
     
    rbernie, Demi-human and chicharrones like this.
  4. Sniper66

    Sniper66 Member

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    Hey jmr40.......This info is really helpful. Thanks for your help. Tom
     
  5. hdwhit
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    hdwhit Member

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    Maybe it has to do with the fact I've had their stocks on rifles for more than 30 years of flawless service, maybe it has to with the fact my farm is just up the road from their factory, maybe its the good prices and excellent service I have received from them, but the first place I shop for a composite/synthetic stock is Choate.
     
  6. Varminterror

    Varminterror Member

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    I WISH it only cost $500-600 for my last Manners... Add a 1 in front... Base price is base price...

    If I just want a stock, I order a Boyd's, pillar block it, do the bedding, free float, seal, and be merry for somewhere around $250 and 4hrs invested. If I want a proper stock, it's either Manners or McMillan. If I want a purely custom, fine walnut stock, it's Macon.
     
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  7. Demi-human

    Demi-human Member

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    It's hard to beat a Manners. It's hard to beat a Boyds for value. It's very hard to beat a nice peice of Claro Walnut for appeal. :thumbup:
     
  8. rbernie
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    rbernie Member

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    Just as an interesting observation; the MDT LSS chassis, complete with Hogue pistol grip, carbine buffer tube, and MagPul MOE-SL stock comes in right around 32oz, not including the magazine (which adds another 3oz-4oz). It's probably a bit heavy for all-day field carry, but that's not too bad for a target stock that costs around $500 ready-to-go.
     
  9. FL-NC

    FL-NC Member

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    For just a hunting rifle that comes with a junky plastic stock (like the RAR) I go with a Boyd's laminate.
     
  10. Skylerbone

    Skylerbone Member

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    I have an HS Pro 2000 on a Remington 700 that’s been very serviceable. A far cry from the multi-thousand dollar options but capable of surviving jolting rides, poor/changing weather conditions, climbs/descents from a tree stand, and still looks near new.

    Not the best or the worst but I like it as a hunting grade stock.
     
  11. 22250Rem

    22250Rem Member

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    Put a Bell & Carlson on my Kimber sporterized Mod. 96 Swedish Mauser and it's the best thing I ever did for that gun. It replaced the plastic injection molded Ram-Line stock that Kimber was using on them circa 1995. The Ram-Line had cracked down by the recoil lug. Gun wasn't shooting like it used to. Couldn't figure out why until I took it out of the stock. The Bell & Carlson has a big aluminum bedding block surface that holds the barreled action solidly and now the gun shoots great again. All this for 280-something bucks. A buddy of mine has a Weatherby Vanguard in 257 Weatherby with a Bell & Carlson and he's as happy with it as I am with mine. IIRC his also cost about the same as mine. You can spend lots more and there's lots of really good composite stocks available but for the money those B & C's are hard to beat. Here's the Swede with its new stock. IMG_1874.JPG
     

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