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Call it "bubba'd" if you want.

Discussion in 'Rifle Country' started by jordan1948, Jul 11, 2009.

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  1. Storm

    Storm Member

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    I tend to agree with that. But, the 1916 that I bought, which was in a sporter stock (still a project gun) only needed to have the guts of the gun removed and dropped in an original stock to bring it back to "as original". Had he hacked off an inch of barrel or tapped the receiver for a scope the gun could never go back.

    I think that the image of a hack with a hacksaw is a good one, if not totally inclusive of the breed.

    Again, have fun, that's the main thing. What makes one man cringe makes another salivate.
     
  2. MCgunner

    MCgunner Member

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    Hey, if it's MY rifle and it makes me happy, go buy your own and do what you want to with it. I don't have a sporter at the moment, have done 'em out of a 7x57 spanish mauser and dressed up a SKS before. That Mauser was a 60 dollar gun and left the 20" barrel and military stock on it. All I did was have it drilled and tapped, mounted a scope, and turned down the bolt, total of about 120 bucks in the gun less scope. It made for a rugged hunting rifle until I got other "remchesters" in my collection. I sold it to a guy at work for $150 after I'd shot a few deer with it. Think I didn't like about it was the rapid twist rate and the fact that it only seemed to like 175 grain round nose bullets.
     
  3. Cosmoline

    Cosmoline Member

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    Nobody is saying you can't, I'm saying you should think twice before you cut. That twist rate you disliked makes that particular rifle excellent for taking surprisingly large game--IF you know how to load for it.

    Oh, and your "60 dollar gun", well here it is going for near four bills

    http://www.gunbroker.com/Auction/ViewItem.asp?Item=133612660

    As the seller notes, its "Getting a lot harder to find these in original condition."
     
  4. Storm

    Storm Member

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    And, McGunner, you ended up with a heck of a rifle in a great caliber. My two little 1916's, both restored from rather bad sporters, make me happy because of the historical aspect and experiencing them as they were used in combat. Your enjoyment is a fine hunting rifle. It's all about what makes you grin.

    On another note, you really can't give Bubba too broad of a definition or all of those SL8/G36, USC/UMP and Saiga converters out there are going to have something to say about it all :evil:
     
  5. MCgunner

    MCgunner Member

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    I was always a little worried about loading that little mauser up to excessive levels being the older 93 cocks on closing action. But, ain't much around here a 175 grain round nose at 2400 fps can't stop. LOL!

    I bought the gun as a cheap project, not for collection purposes. But, I guess I could have bought two and kept one if I'd thought it'd ever be worth anything, LOL! I sold it because I bought a "remchester" I liked better in 7mm, actually a Savage 110 in 7 Rem Mag. Anything a 7x57 can do, a 7 Rem Mag can do, after all.

    I still have a 8x57 Hakim semi auto battle rifle WITH bayonet I bought for range fun and that I thought it'd be worth something someday being a bit rare with an odd action. That thing is 12 lbs if it's an ounce and about 20 feet long. ROFL! Even BUBBA wouldn't bubba that thing. LOL! But, for 80 bucks, I just had to have it. Wish I'd bought a couple of cases of 'em, but you just never know. I also have an unbubbaed 1888 Commission rifle in 8x57S, arsenal converted from the original J caliber. I gave $27.50 for it and it's in VG condition. Only thing I've ever shot with it is snakes on a farm tank. LOL I've fired up about 400 rounds through it over that time, just sits in a closet. Not exactly bubba material either. I just got it for the same reason people buy Mosins, cheap, goes bang. LOL Mosins are more practical guns to actually USE, though, the short ones, anyway. I might get one of those if I still had an FFL just for grins. I wouldn't bubba it, just get it for cheap thrills. They are kinda fun to shoot and major bargains for todays dollar, but I remember when they were going for 40 bucks back in the early 90s. I'm surprised I didn't get one or three. LOL!
     
  6. R.W.Dale

    R.W.Dale Member

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    just sayin, the seller can ask for that all he wants doesn't mean anyone will bid

    check out the bids on this one
    http://www.gunbroker.com/Auction/ViewItem.asp?Item=133516822

    but don't find the most overpriced gunbroker auction and post it as though it means anything other than how overinflated the seller feels the value of his item is. In fact in all of GB "bolt actions" using the search term Spanish there isn't a single item with bids
     
  7. jimmyraythomason

    jimmyraythomason Member

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    Last edited: Jul 12, 2009
  8. Bob R

    Bob R Member

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    You want bubba...well..do ya?

    For every well executed modified milsurp posted in this thread there is one of these, or worse (I don't know how though), lurking in the basements of the world.

    pix2832645546.gif

    GB 133958752

    I.... I..... I.... am speechless, yep, that's it, speechless.

    bob
     
  9. R.W.Dale

    R.W.Dale Member

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    OK now that's hilarious

    I especially like the homemade square tubing brake

    and all for the low low price of $1200, which just goes to show stupid can extend beyond craftsmanship and engineering but to retail as well.

    I wonder where your cheek is supposed to go?
     
  10. Olympus

    Olympus Member

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    I'm going to have to disagree with you on this. It's not totally pointless. Nobody rebuilds a military rifle anymore because it is cost effective. That used to be the case long ago when sport rifles were much more expensive than military rifles and when gunsmith services could be used to convert the military rifle into a sporter. That was how "sporterizing" first came about. But now, someone would really have be clueless to think they can sporterize a military rifle for cheaper than they can buy a modern commercial rifle off the shelf. The reasons why people have chosen to sportize a military rifle are varied and there are threads upon threads about why they have been done. You'll be hard pressed to find anyone that has done it because it was cheaper.

    It's not arrogance or narrow-mindedness either. Reviving a historic military rifle by refurbishing it will almost certainly reduce its value. If you take a beat up and abused WWII artifact and rebarrel, reblue, and refinish the stock, you've just hurt the value of that rifle. Just because people put scopes on a rifle doesn't mean they don't understand how to use iron sights. I'm sure you drive a vehicle with power steering and power brakes. You don't see anyone saying that you have a lack of imagination because you don't drive a vehicle that doesn't have power steer or brakes. Nobody is saying you're arrogant or narrow-minded because of that either. It's an evolutionary process.
     
    Last edited: Jul 12, 2009
  11. theotherwaldo

    theotherwaldo Member

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    I just love to pick up Bubba's rejects. They're always cheap, usually loaded with good parts, and, whatever happens, there's no guilt attached.

    Build whatever I want with whatever I've got.

    Then, if I don't like its look or it doesn't do the job, I can scrap it and start over.

    For the fun (and experience) of it!
     
  12. Nanook
    • Contributing Member

    Nanook Contributing Member

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    Olympus, and gunlover06, I may not know everything about milsurp rifles.

    But you guys each have an excellent and beautiful rifle. Both of those rifles are flat out gorgeous, whatever their origins.

    Good job, both of you.
     
  13. Deckard

    Deckard Member

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  14. Olympus

    Olympus Member

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    Nanook...thanks for the kind words. I didn't want to rush the project and make it look like a "bubba". It took me a little over two years to finish the project. It shoots even better than it looks.
     
  15. dirtyjim

    dirtyjim Member

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    i'll even bubba a remchester
    i bought a brand spankin new remington 799 mini mauser & started choppin on it as soon as i got it home. the goal is to end up with a pre-WWI british style sporting rifle, but on a smaller scale. right now i'm still working the stock so i can have it duplicated. its got a lot of drop & a little bit of cast off. the grip has been swept way back & the forearm shortened in the british style. i still have a lot of shaping to do before its ready for the duplicator.
    minimauserdropstock.jpg

    the triggerguard was cut in half right infront of the triggerbow & the triggerbow was welded back on .150 higher to give the look of a drop box. i then made a new front section for the triggerbow & welded it inplace. i still have to cut the slot for the in the bow release & rework the back of the floorplate into a straddle style. the original trigger was replaced with a sako trigger that fit the shape of the bow a lot better. i will weld on a extended tang to the back of the receiver with the safety mounted in it. i've stated on the thumb cut in the side of the receiver, the rear bridge will also be cut for a stripper clip slot & get a single square bridge welded on.
    minimauserdropbox.jpg
    sights are coming from recknagel in germany, it will get a banded rear with one standing & one folding along with a banded front. a barrel band swivel will also come from recknagel.
    i'll have to get a oberndorf style bolt handle machined in the right scale to fit this rifle.

    there was no way i could leave it looking like this.
    799.jpg
     
  16. Dr. Peter Venkman

    Dr. Peter Venkman Member

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  17. Cosmoline

    Cosmoline Member

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    And a puppy dies everytime you do it!
     
  18. Olympus

    Olympus Member

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    You'd be hard pressed to find a commercial-made rifle that is identical to mine.

    And that argument doesn't hold much weight in my book. It's like saying that every rifle with a sporter-style stock and scope are all the same.
     
  19. Dr. Peter Venkman

    Dr. Peter Venkman Member

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    Richard's Stocks can be placed on anything.

    They aren't all the same, they do have different logos on them.
     
  20. gunlover_06

    gunlover_06 Member

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    Nanook Sir
    Thank you for the compliment, the rifle started out as swedish model 1896 in 6.5x55 the barrel was crap, reciever was in good shape but needed some work, so I had my smith blueprint and true up the action, Then he installed a Douglas number 4 contour fluted barrel, Timney trigger that breaks like glass,bedded and floated the barrel,boyds stock D&T the reciever and she shoots like a dream.

    Now would I have done this to an all matching nice milsurp absolutely NO but would never tell someone else they should'nt
     
  21. Olympus

    Olympus Member

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    There's a lot more to making a rifle than just the stock, my friend.

    Among other things...
     
  22. jimmyraythomason

    jimmyraythomason Member

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    If you've ever bought a Richard's Microfit stock,then you know your work has just started. Those are the roughest 95% stocks I have ever seen.
     
  23. Dr. Peter Venkman

    Dr. Peter Venkman Member

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    Really?
     
  24. Olympus

    Olympus Member

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    You're telling me! That was easily the longest part of the project. I don't know if it was the particular laminated that I got or what, but it would show even the tiniest of scratches. I sanded and sanded and sanded...

    Not to mention that it took forever to even get them to ship it to me. Or even answer their phone for that matter.
     
  25. Storm

    Storm Member

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    In all fairness, if you look at completed auctions over the past 90 days you will see several Spanish Mausers, 1893 and 1916, that went for a range (roughly) of $150 to $370. The cited auction is on the high end but is not without precedent. The most common range seems to be $200 to $250.

    That said, the Spanish Mauser, especially the 1916, may not be the best rifle to use as an example. Most were arsenal re-chambered from 7x57 to .308 NATO and controversies as to the safety in firing them have abounded. There have also been blatantly false claims that the actions were not heat treated, and those types of claims have hurt values. While it is true that metallurgy in 1893 wasn't what it is today, Spanish Mausers have taken a bad rap that is not totally deserved, except with some exceptions. 7x57 chambered rifles continue to be valued, as is the round.

    That all gets to the point of money. While the value of a milsurp can be diminished by modifications, the issue of money goes both ways. Folks do spend quite a bit sporterizing milsurps, and it is questionable if they will ever get it back out of a rifle. The same can also be true with restoring milsurps. For example, a 1916 that I just did cost me $120 with a butchered stock. A "new" military stock ran me $80 and a cleaning rod another $20. All told I probably have $230 in the rifle. If i were to ever sell it, I may only get as little as $150. But, I really don't care as the point of the restoration was not to sell the rifle or make a profit. In fact, to have the rifle I want I am perfectly willing to set myself up to take a loss. The same goes with guys doing sporterizing as they often spend far more than the gun will ever be worth. I really don't think it's about the money. I think that both sides do what they do despite the money, so the economic arguments ring flat with me as accurate as they are.

    BTW, all of those botched Bubba's out there really are gold to me, as someone has said, in that I feel no obligations with my restorations, and that whatever I can do to return the gun to "original" is just icing on the cake.
     
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