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Case Sodbuster Jr.

Discussion in 'Non-Firearm Weapons' started by sm, Feb 13, 2008.

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  1. sm

    sm member

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    Case Sodbuster Jr.
    Yellow Handle, Chrome Vanadium Blade.

    Lady bought one after "someone" said she needed one.
    Read : "She will take this one".
    Purchased at a local mom and pop feed and seed store.

    Fit and finish is great!
    Everything lines up, finished out, and as it is supposed to be.
    Walk-n-talk is superb!

    Sharp out of the box, and the edge is congruent on both sides, from tang to tip.

    This knife, often called a Clasp Knife pattern, fits her hands as it does most hands.
    It fools people as to how it disappears in a pocket. Blue Jeans or dress casual, even a skirt, blazer, or jacket pocket.

    Under magnification, the knife was inspected, and again, no flaws.

    Now I don't normally use compound to strop, still the lady wanted to see and learn.
    Semichrome by Happich is the best polish, I have used this all my life,as I was raised with this.
    I applied a wee bit to the back of a legal pad that was going to be tossed.
    Pulling spine back, it did not take long for that edge to have a mirror finish.

    Final strop using a dab of Semichrome on newpaper, again, she wanted to see this done.

    Knife was washed with Lemon Joy ( I like the lemon smell, and it matches the knife) and the blade was placed point down into a glass and Dr. Pepper was added just up to the tang.
    Errands run, and about 3 hours later, this blade had a nice patina.

    Now this patina includes the edge, so a few strokes on that newspaper and the edge was mirror polished.

    Clean, a drop of Kleen-bore formula 3 gun oil on pivot, and a drop on a pipecleaner for inside handle wipe.

    Quick review on how to open this knife safely with only one hand.
    Blade is above handles and just pinch it.
    She put on work gloves and practiced this a few times.

    Now she is going to use this knife, and I suggested back pocket for what we were going to do next.
    She understood why, as it is hard to get a knife out of a front jeans pocket with leather work gloves on.
    *duh*
    I showed her how to overcome that and to using the knife she went.

    She cut some branches, some as big around as my thumb. Just using proper technique got a nice stack of branches.
    She made fuzz sticks, shavings, and kindling.
    Made a nice tee pee and with the blade closed, struck a magnesium fire starter with the spine, and tossed some real nice sparks!

    Chrome Vanadium tosses real nice sparks as does 1095 carbon steel - make a note of this.

    While the fire was going, she make some hot dawg forks from branches, broke down some cardboard , cut twine, ski rope, 550 cord, leather (old football) and got used to the knife.

    Hot dawg roast, and the Sodbuster Jr did a mighty nice job of spreading mustard , relish and other food prep one needs.

    Some of the branches she had make a lean-to with, just a small one, for just doing, and this was later added to brush fire.

    Now the edge was still sharp, all it needed was stropping, and using my jeans, on pants leg, it sharpened up nice enough for field use. I could have used my belt.

    Now my recommendations are the Norton India Combo Sportsman stone, coarse/fine and it is just a smaller IB6 / IB8, at ~ 3"x1" inches.
    With this stone, one can sharpen anything - period.

    She also bought the Case Fine Hard stone, in the plastic box that is 2 7/8" x 1", This often times is all one needs to touch up a Case knife with CV, that needs something more than just a strop.

    DRY Hones, I do not do oil and I do not do water.

    Lessons continued with me showing her freehand sharpening with the Case Fine Hard stone.
    Stone in weak hand, knife in strong hand and in a few minutes, sharper .
    Since were still outside, just as one would be hiking, camping and such, I just stropped on blue jeans.

    I did use the Norton small stone to sharpen an Old Hickory Utility knife, for lesson purposes, just as one might have to do afield or in an emergency situation.

    Sodbuster Jr. She has used for everything from food prep, outdoors, around the house, in the garage, - for any task.
    She is going to get another one or two, for emergency kit, and back ups for whatever situation may arise.

    Back spring is strong, she knows the proper way to use a knife, still that spring is "that" resistant to closing.

    She really likes the size, weight, how it pocket carries so well, and ease of care, and that edge and patina, she really really likes!

    While she has a Norton IB6, she has gotten to only using the small Norton and Case stone for all sharpening jobs.
    Portable, and easy to have when outdoors, down on the property, hiking, camping , canoing...anything.

    Yellow, just proven to be easy to see and keep up with.

    Case Sodbuster Jr., Yellow Handles, CV blades - Proven, and Highly Recommended!


    Steve
     
  2. mp510

    mp510 Member

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    Yup, the Soddie is a very nice pattern. I have a Kissing Crane 35.
     
  3. ArfinGreebly

    ArfinGreebly Moderator Emeritus

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    Bigger Than It Looks

    Sodbuster pattern is deceptively "small" looking.

    I have a Large Böker (yellow handle, carbon steel blade) that doesn't look nearly as large as the EKA Swede 92 (Normark) folding hunter or the Buck 110 folding hunter, but the moment you open it, the darn thing just grows a whole size.

    There is every bit as much knife in the large sodbuster as there is in a Buck 110, it just seems smaller. It weighs less (like half), yet the blade is a surprisingly authoritative expanse of steel.

    My small one (Case XX, stainless) has the same deal. Looks small, then you open it.

    Looking forward to getting my Case XX in yellow/CV.

    Funny how yellow grows on ya.

     
    Last edited: Oct 23, 2008
  4. Pax Jordana

    Pax Jordana Member

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    My only qualm is that it shows up so well in moonlight - so I spraypainted mine black and had it teflon coated.


    (runs away)

    BUT SERIOUSLY FOLKS

    I've been keeping mine happy on a rapala filet knife sharpener. Funny how such a little knife can pack so much punch! In fact, today in class a young lady asked me exactly how I got such conspicuous bare spots in my arm hair.. Heck, maybe she's on the level. At any rate, I gotta learn to freehand (and shave left handed to even out the arms)

    Now I gotta find me a buck 110.. and that silverado I've been looking at.. and a can of skoal. yeaaaaah.
     
  5. Joe Demko

    Joe Demko Member

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    Somebody, I think it was Case, used to make a Sodbuster with a brass locking liner similar to what you see on electrician's knives. I used to see them at the hardware store when I was a kid back in the 60's and 70's. Wish I had bought one then, because I haven't seen one in decades.
     
  6. sm

    sm member

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    Joe,
    I remember that knife, and if cannot remember whom made the locking liner.
    I want to say Camillus did.

    The brass liner lock was real similar to Shrade Old Timer Gunboat Trapper and Mighty Mite.

    Honestly, the Sodbuster and Sodbuster Jr design, and back spring is so well - I don't worry about needing a lock.

    Then again, I was raised on pocket-knives /slip-joints.
    Proper use of tools, correct basics, and Safety being between the ears and not on a lock of a knife, or safety of a firearm.

    Earth was beginning to be less flat and more round-ish when I was coming up.
    *wink*

    Steve
     
  7. Valkman

    Valkman Member

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    Lately I'm carrying a Moore Maker Whittler with carbon steel blades - I love the way they stay sharp as opposed to stainless.
     
  8. Joe Demko

    Joe Demko Member

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    Okay, did a little research. Case made the liner-locking Sodbusters. They had the same pattern number as the regular Sodbusters with an "-L" added. Looks like they haven't made any since sometime pre-1990 at least.

    I found these while looking around. They look something like the ones I remember, but only something. Can't say I ever heard of the Rough Rider brand, either. Given the price point at which they are selling, my guess is they are a product of PRC or maybe Pakistan. The question isn't whether they are crappy. The question is does anybody have personal knowledge of how crappy they are?
     
  9. jparham

    jparham Member

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    Hmm- a lot of people bash Rough Rider, but they're really not that bad. Sure, they aren't Cases, but they come with good edges, and good looking, and pretty durable. The are decent knives and unbeatable for the price.
     
  10. Coyote3855

    Coyote3855 Member

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    I don't have direct experience with Rough Rider. I do have a Pakistan knock-off of a Buck 110, with white bone scales. I paid under $10.00. It locks up tight, holds an edge, scale fit to brass bolsters is excellent. Even a blind hog gets an acorn once in a while. Low price is not always an indication of crappy quality.
     
  11. sm

    sm member

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    Joe,
    Case did do those with a liner lock, now that you investigated and confirmed.
    Dang, I should have remembered that. *duh*

    Valkman,
    I am interested in how well the Moore Maker's do, keep us advised.
    I really like some of their offerings.
    Did you get the blue sharpening stone? I am very curious about that stone too.

    Re: Imports.
    At this time, my and mine experience is, these Rough Riders, Buck, and Steel Warriors, start out fine. Some have better fit and finish than the Original maker, and other USA mfgs.

    Heat treat is funny, as it seems the edges do well, until sharpened a few times.
    Backsprings are fine - until they too decide to soften up.

    To check out a pattern, and/or know it will be relegated to misuse later, these are fine.
    Akin to a inexpensive screwdriver we know we are going to pry, mix paint, use as a chisel, and the like.
     
  12. Valkman

    Valkman Member

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    I got this MM in a trade and it's old enough that the blades have some patina and man they're sharp! I don't have a blue sharpening stone - sounds interesting.
     
  13. sm

    sm member

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    http://www.mooremaker.com/

    I've seen /used some pliers they make, real nice!

    Just the knives caught my eye being 1095 carbon steel.
    Their Sodbuster:
    http://catalog.mooremaker.com/viewProduct.cfm?item_id=708141

    Pocket Whestone:
    http://catalog.mooremaker.com/viewProduct.cfm?item_id=392629

    Oh I go w-a-y back having to freehand sharpen special tools, and I have my preferences on sharpening stones...
    Just that stone, like some others I have used, just intrigues me, is neat and all.
    Like the old Razor Stones that had raised letters on one side from back in the day is all.

    I'm old school, I like being able to be out in the middle of nowhere, and free hand sharpen with a 3" or less stone and be done with it.
    Heck anywhere.

    Sodbuster, Peanut, even a Old Hickory kitchen knife, I've gotten to where I do not use a bigger stone very often...rather not, just sometimes that is the only stone, or I /they don't feel like walking to the truck, or other room to get the small one.
     
  14. Valkman

    Valkman Member

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    Dang it - now I went to their site for the first time! Neat stuff and I ended up getting a marble, a hat and that whetstone. Looks great!

    My Whittler says "5308" on it and "1999". Kinda yellow bone handles. :)
     
  15. Joe Demko

    Joe Demko Member

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    Located a circa 1970 Case liner-locking Sodbuster on Ebay last night. Won it for $28. I need to start staying out of this forum. Hanging with you guys is bad for my budget.
     
  16. Zeke/PA

    Zeke/PA Member

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    Mooremaker was a new expirence for me.
    Some great looking knives therein.
    What is it about knives that makes them so intrigeing?
    I really like the Muskrat that I saw.
    Zeke
     
  17. Coyote3855

    Coyote3855 Member

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    I have carried a Mooremaker small trapper since 1999. Recent bought one of their machetes. Excellent products. Also have two of their fence pliers, the large and the small. Small is bit light for anything other than carrying in a saddle pocket and replacing a few staples. The large size is a substantial tool for building fence. And made in USA.
     
  18. JLaw

    JLaw Member

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    "the blade was placed point down into a glass and Dr. Pepper was added just up to the tang. Errands run, and about 3 hours later, this blade had a nice patina."

    Well I'm about convinced that I need to order a Sodbuster Jr. Sounds like a real handy all-around blade. However, I'm not sure what you are talking about by putting the blade in a glass with Dr. Pepper to add a patina to the blade...what's that and what is it's purpose?

    JLaw
     
  19. ArfinGreebly

    ArfinGreebly Moderator Emeritus

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    Patina

    From Wikipedia:
    Said of a knife blade, the darkening of the surface of a carbon steel blade that normally occurs over time with exposure to oxidizing agents.

    The patina can be induced by deliberate exposure to an oxidizer (like the acids in fruit or a carbonated drink).

    Its purpose is to act as a natural rust inhibitor. It also reduces reactions with acidic foods, minimizing taste transfers.

    This does not apply to stainless steels.

    You will get a gradual darkening of a carbon steel (or chrome vanadium) blade over time, but it probably won't be even, and will exhibit some blotching or streaking.

    By deliberately inducing the patina by exposure to a uniform oxidizer, this irregularity can be avoided, and the blackish (or grey) discoloration can be evenly established.

    If you order a Sodbuster Jr in SS (stainless), you won't be dealing with the whole patina thing.

    You only have this as a concern if you buy the Case XX 3137CV, or another brand in Carbon Steel. I have the Case Sodbuster Jr. in stainless, but my (large) Böker sodbuster is in carbon steel.

    Oh, you wanted to know the time? Sorry, I thought you wanted to build a watch. Oops.

    :D
     
    Last edited: Feb 17, 2008
  20. sm

    sm member

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    Arf,
    Thanks for the post.

    Gun Bluing is essentially "forced rust" then stopped.
    It protects the carbon steel from further rust.

    Stain-less - just means the metal composition is "less" prone to rust.
    It will rust.

    The important aspects of getting a good blue job on a gun, such as Colt and S&W were know for back in the day, was due to craftsman, that were Master Polishers, that finished out the carbon steel to a high polish.
    Then the bluing salts applied by craftsman, to that highly polished carbon steel is what gave those guns that deep bluing.

    That bluing protected carbon steel with finer metal components.
    Stainless components are not as small...


    So with a Carbon steel/ Chrome Vanadium blade, the introduction of patina as Arf shared protects the blade.

    How "polished out " or how "well finished out" that blade is, will play a part into how that blade takes various forced patina.

    A new, bright and shiny Case CV blade(s) , cleaned and decreased, no finger prints, with Carbonated drink or Gun blue, will give a more even and uniform finish that some things used to introduce patina.

    Naturally if one carries and uses a CV blade, and gets the normal wear marks, and then introduces patina with Dr. Pepper or bluing, that finish will not - be the same had the blade been done while still high polish.


    Same reason why a Jeweler will polish a white gold or platinum ring, clean, degrease and then Rhodium plate it.
    It is whiter and brighter and the refraction of light makes the diamond(s) look whiter and brighter.

    If the ring is white gold mtg and yellow gold shank, jeweler will mask the yellow with nail polish to make sure none of the Rhodium gets onto yellow gold.


    Same principles applying to guns, knives, jlry and other things in life, to protect and enhance usefulness.
     
  21. sm

    sm member

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    Marble?

    Oh this is too good of a set up about Valkman and needing to get a marble...*snicker*

    I will be nice, as I am interested in hearing his review about that whetstone, and one of these day he might actually let me buy something from him. *grin*

    Re: Sodbuster I sometimes wish these had a Lanyard Hole.
    I know some mfgs do, still there are times, where having that option is really nice on a knife and the Sodbuster and Sodbuster Jr, are two such knives IMO.
     
  22. JLaw

    JLaw Member

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    Okay, thanks for the education on patina. It makes more sense now.

    I did order a Case Sodbuster Jr. CV with yellow handle last night (SMKN had a good internet deal going on with this model) so I'll be sure to do this when it arrives.

    Would soaking the blade in vinegar do the trick?

    JLaw
     
  23. sixgunner455

    sixgunner455 Member

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    Vinegar, Dr. Pepper, stick it in a potato, or an apple, cut up a pomegranate. Just use the durn thing, it will get a patina on it.
     
  24. JLaw

    JLaw Member

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    Great, thanks. Looking forward to it's arrival.

    JLaw.
     
  25. Joe Demko

    Joe Demko Member

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    My Sodbuster arrived today. It's big. It's black. After a couple minutes with the Spyderco sharpener and a manilla envelope, it's screaming sharp. And I like the liner lock. The only thing it needs for perfection is a lanyard hole.
     
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