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Checking Your Scale

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by Tamitch, Apr 13, 2013.

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  1. Tamitch

    Tamitch Member

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    Do any of you reloaders have a weight gage set to check your scale and powder measure?
     
  2. clutch

    clutch Member

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    Yes I do. Lyman makes an inexpensive set of check weights. I can't believe it took me 30 years to get a set.
     
  3. zxcvbob

    zxcvbob Member

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    I have a designated dime with '35' written on it with a Sharpie. It weighs exactly (by my decree) 35 grains. ;) It works because I use the same one every time.
     
  4. cwbys4evr

    cwbys4evr Member

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    Good idea ^

    Sent from my PC36100 using Tapatalk 2
     
  5. higgite

    higgite Member

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  6. rg1

    rg1 Member

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    Yes I have Lyman's Scale Check Weight set and use it. Makes me confident that my digital electronic scale is accurate at all charges from .380 pistol to large rifle loads. I also check my balance beam RCBS when I do get it out of storage. For what it's worth, my Pact Precision has always been accurate and it's about 17-18 years old.
     
  7. rcmodel

    rcmodel Member in memoriam

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    IMO: A 35 grain dime works great.

    Unless you are weighing 3.5 grain powder charges.

    So does a 55 grain Hornady V-Max bullet.
    Unless you are weighing 5.5 grain powder charges.

    Buy a check weight set.

    rc
     
  8. Reloadron
    • Contributing Member

    Reloadron Member

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    Yes, been bringing home test weights from work for years. Retiring soon so time to pop for my own set and check them in the lab at work before I am out of there. :)

    The Lyman set seems a good well priced set for the buck.

    I also do have assorted test weights that came with scales.

    Ron
     
    Last edited: Apr 13, 2013
  9. gamestalker

    gamestalker member

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    I can seem to find a reason why a good beam scale would suddenly start throwing bad weights? I still check mine every time there is a blue moon, but it's right on the money, even after several decades of reliable service.
    GS
     
  10. rcmodel

    rcmodel Member in memoriam

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    It won't change.
    Unless you drop it.

    Or the bearing pivot pin finally cracks the beam while setting in its storage box after 40+ years like my old RCBS scales did a couple of years ago.

    No matter what you use for a check weight, be it a bullet, a dime, or a known weight of belly button lent.

    Use something.

    rc
     
  11. clutch

    clutch Member

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    I had a loose pivot in my Lyman scale. It took me a long time to figure out why my zero would shift a few tenths from time to time.
     
  12. mtrmn

    mtrmn Member

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    I knocked my RCBS 1010 off a shelf recently and had trouble with it zeroing. When I investigated further, the pivot was loose in the beam like you mentioned. I sent it to RCBS for "evaluation" and repair. When I returned home from work 3 weeks later I found a brand new 1010 scale with an invoice that said it was free of charge. Never expected to get it replaced, just wanted to see if it was repairable. THANKS RCBS!!!
     
  13. Joatmon

    Joatmon Member

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    I check it every time I use it (new session). It only takes a minute or two to check 2 weights (low and high mass) to calibrate and see if there are issues. A problem could be caused by a simple bit of dust or dreck on the pivot point. Maybe I am OCD but thats me.
     
  14. dickttx

    dickttx Member

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    Every time I start to load I check the level of my beam scale.
    Then I throw a charge from my PAD and see that it still weighs the same as previously.
    You could say I use my scale to check my powder measure and use my powder measure to check my scale. Everytime.
     
  15. Outlaw714

    Outlaw714 Member

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    A dime is an inexpensive way to check.
     
  16. daboone

    daboone Member

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  17. Jitterbug

    Jitterbug Member

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    Each and every time...I wouldn't reload without confirming.
     
  18. tbob38

    tbob38 Member

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    I just got a check weight set, after 45 years of reloading.
     
  19. John3921

    John3921 Member

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    I'm thinking about a check weight now. I have a Lyman 500 beam scale that I've used for the last 20 odd years. Loading for the 45 I'm looking at 4.2 gr of clays. When I zero out the scale and adjust the throw to drop 4.2 consistently, then I will throw 10 and weigh it. I rather consistently get about 43.5 for 10 drops. I'm thinking I want to make myself a 4.2 grain check weight and use that to zero the scale.
     
  20. 16in50calNavalRifle

    16in50calNavalRifle Member

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    Just to throw out another option, based on a post here in this forum I learned of check weights from McMaster-Carr, an industrial tool and parts supplier. Ordered a 1-gram and a 5-gram weight, for a grand total of $11.88 (incl. shipping). Delivered in less than 24 hours. I figure these two weights will provide confidence in my RCBS 505 at the lower- and upper-range of weights relevant to my reloading. (www.mcmaster.com)

    Sure enough, the scale indicated what looked to be exactly the right reading for the two check weights. Oh - and mtrmn, to echo your account, I bought a 505, used. Seemed squirrelly, didn't seem right, first time I went to reload. Contacted RCBS, they said send it in, sure enough 10 days later a brand-new 505 was delivered free of charge. Ended up paying $20 for an $80 scale.
     
    Last edited: Apr 15, 2013
  21. steelerdude99

    steelerdude99 Member

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    A poor man's check weight is a BB, they are supposed to be 5.1 grain.
     
  22. edfardos

    edfardos Member

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    some lead shavings in a ball of masking tape. Make one for each of your favorite loads.. Always zero first, then verify your selected weight with hour tape/lead check weight.. Write the grain value on the tape.

    edfardos
     
  23. Searcher4851

    Searcher4851 Member

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    Yes I have and use check weights on my scale. I use an Ohaus 10-10. I guess I just figure if I'm going to use a precision piece of equipment, it just makes sense to make sure it IS precise. JMHO
     
  24. Geno
    • Contributing Member

    Geno Member

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    I sure do, and I use it. Better safe than sorry.

    Geno
     
  25. BYJO4

    BYJO4 Member

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    A set of check weights is a good investment. They don't cost alot and will insure your scale is accurate.
     
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