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Chrono in snow

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by warth0g, Jan 17, 2006.

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  1. warth0g

    warth0g Member

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    Yesterday, I was trying to get a reading from a a chrono. It was snow on the ground, very low sun and i didnt get more than two readings out of about 15 rounds. So my question, anyone have any practical solutions to this problem?

    warthog
     
  2. USSR

    USSR Member

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    warthog,

    First thing I'd try is replacing the the 9v battery.

    Don
     
  3. warth0g

    warth0g Member

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    Always an good idea!

    More solutions, if the battery is well?

    warthog
     
  4. dakotasin

    dakotasin Member

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    when the sun gets low, especially in the grey days of winter, its just really hard to get reliable, consistent readings. best solution is to shoot earlier in the day.
     
  5. DragonFire

    DragonFire Member

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    I think I read in my chrony's instructions that it doesn't work reliably under 39 degrees or so. Trying to get readings outside in winter is difficult.

    Also with clear skies, you may need to have the "shades" on the chrony. (The plastic pieces that install on the guide rods so that they are over each eye of the chrony).
     
  6. Sport45

    Sport45 Member

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    I don't have any experience with chronographs in snow, but I'll offer this from the instructions from A PACT chrono. The chrono is looking for something to pass over which is darker than the sky or skyscreens. If the sun is low (or I suppose if there is enough reflected light from the snow) the reflection off the bottom of the bullet my be brighter than the sky and will not be picked up. Their solution is to rig a shade to the sun side to prevent reflections off of the bullet.
     
  7. Ol` Joe

    Ol` Joe Member

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    Sport45s suggestion to shade the sunny side may help.
    I just turn the head on my tripod to have the sunshades face away from the sun and shoot through the crony with the screens at 90 Deg angle to the ground. You have to be careful as the space between the shade legs is reduced when you do this. It also works if the ground is wet or the sun is too low and reflected light is causing problems.
     
  8. warth0g

    warth0g Member

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    thanks for the answers!

    ol`joe you said: "I just turn the head on my tripod to have the sunshades face away from the sun "

    I would have belived the opposite to be most effective, as the bullet will give more shade as it passes the photocells, if the photocells/sunshade is pointed towards the sun?


    warthog
     
  9. USSR

    USSR Member

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    warthog,

    Direct sunlight on a Chrony's sensors are bad ju-ju. Will cause exceptionally high readings.

    Don
     
  10. The Bushmaster

    The Bushmaster Member

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    "bad ju-ju"? USSR?? Is that a reloading term??? L M A O:D
     
  11. Ol` Joe

    Ol` Joe Member

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    Bright light blinds the sensors, just as it blinds a persons eyes if too bright. The white sun shade offers enough contrast for the eyes to "see" the bullet. I`ve acually had the sensors tipped and no shades attached and the unit managed to read off the grass on the side berm 25-30 ft away. The readings were a bit questionable at times and the sun was very bright. I did it just to see what would happen. I would not rely on getting accurate readings doing this though.

    I often don`t use the shades at all on overcast days and the Pact I have seems to have no trouble with picking up the shot and readings appear normal.

    If you want real problems with your crony, set up next to a guy with a big magnum with a muzzle brake. Then watch your readings go nuts every time he fires. I had a guy once that had my screens rocking from the blast of his rifle. I ended up calling it quits for the day.:cuss: :cuss:
     
  12. warth0g

    warth0g Member

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    Thanks again for your input! Going to the range now, to try agian! "a bad day at the range is better then the best day at work" Cya!

    warthog
     
  13. USSR

    USSR Member

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    Bushmaster,

    Well, you got me??? I googled ju-ju, and it seems that it's some sort of West African black magic akin to voodoo. So, I guess if you're shooting over a Chrony in West Africa, shade dem sensors.:D

    Don
     
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