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Cz 75B compact carry on half-cock ok?

Discussion in 'Handguns: Autoloaders' started by TheProf, Jul 3, 2019.

  1. TheProf

    TheProf Member

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    Please educate me on this.... I'm trying to switch over to carrying CZs.

    What are your thoughts on carrying CZ 75 B (with firing pin block) on half cocked (safety off... It only can be actuated when hammer is fully back)?

    Since the 75s with decockers are carried in half cock position, wouldn't this be ok with the safety models as well?
     
  2. needmorecowbell

    needmorecowbell Member

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    Absolutely ok, that’s why safety not made to engage. Still have heavier 1st trigger pull. Just as safe as a striker fire or DAO
     
  3. Walt Sherrill

    Walt Sherrill Member

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    The decocker models of the 75B guns start from and decock to the half-cock notch so it's safe. (Internally, the two models are quite similar. The decocker models have some extra linkage and one less hammer hook; otherwise they share many parts.)

    Starting from the half-cock notch shortens the trigger pull a bit and lightens the trigger pull a small amount -- as the hammer spring is partially tensioned.and the trigger is moved just a bit to the rear when starting from the safety notch. As noted above, the trigger is still heavier than a SA (with hammer-cocked) start. All of the CZ "B" model designs are equipped with a firing pin block, and the gun can't fire unless the trigger is pulled fully to the rear, and drops or blows or hammer strikes won't cause a unintentional discharge.

    If you shoot IDPA. you aren't allowed to start from the half-cock notch with a safety-equipped model (even though it's legal to do so with the decocker models when shooting Stock Service Pistol. I'm not sure about USPSA matches, but suspect it's the same for USPSA Production guns.
     
    Last edited: Jul 4, 2019
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  4. TheProf

    TheProf Member

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    Thanks !
     
  5. armoredman

    armoredman Member

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    Yes, did it for decades, perfectly OK.
     
  6. Fullclip610

    Fullclip610 Member

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    Hmm, my p07 duty’s safety can be engaged in half cock. Didn’t think the 75b would be any different. Why don’t you just carry it with the hammer down?
     
  7. JTQ

    JTQ Member

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    Trigger reach?
     
  8. TheProf

    TheProf Member

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    Yes. Trigger reach is less on half cock...than compared to hammer fully down.

    Also...to lower the hammer fully down necessitate that I keep the trigger completely pulled back as I lower the hammer. Does this not negate the firing pin block (as long as the trigger is pulled back). Should the hammer slip off my thumb...the gun will fire.

    Lowering to half cock (to me at least) seems safer than lowering down the hammer completely. There's less time that the firing pin block is deactivated.
     
    Last edited: Jul 4, 2019
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  9. JR24

    JR24 Member

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    Indeed it would with the trigger pulled.

    Your offhand thumb over the firing pin is a good bulwark to this, but half cock is fine.
     
  10. ATLDave

    ATLDave Member

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  11. Walt Sherrill

    Walt Sherrill Member

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    If the trigger is fully to the rear, the firing pin block has been deactivated. The secret is to release the trigger as soon as you can, which is a trial and error thing.

    But if you're using your OTHER hand to control the hammer, there's no reason for the hammer to slip, unless you suffer a seizure. And even then, if the barrel is pointed downrange and tilted down to the ground, even if it does slip, there's no issue. If you're doing it inside, you just hang onto the hammer until it's fully down.

    You will eventually become comfortable doing it with one hand, and you'll learn to do it safely. you can practice with an empty chamber and no mag in the gun. As I think I wrote earlier, IT AIN'T ROCKET SCIENCE!

    There are a lot of things people do while shooting around you at a range this is more scary and dangerous than manually decocking a weapon. For some reason, we don't notice those behaviors.
     
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  12. TheProf

    TheProf Member

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    Thanks for the replies. I do value everyone's input. For now, I think the half cock carry will work for me.

    Thanks again...this will help in my transition to carrying CZs.
     
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  13. Deanimator

    Deanimator Member

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    My immediate question is, "why?".

    What advantage do you think this will provide to you?
     
  14. TheProf

    TheProf Member

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    Are you asking about my switching to CZs... or about deciding on half cock carry?
     
  15. Deanimator

    Deanimator Member

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    Half cock.

    I don't have a problem with CZs as long as they can be carried cocked and locked since I loathe conventional D/A in anything bigger than a PPK/S. I've got another thread going about the TISAS HP clone vs the CZ75SA.
     
  16. TheProf

    TheProf Member

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    Less likely to have a ND lowering the hammer to half cock than fully down. This works for me.

    For others ...they may prefer cocked and locked. Others prefer fully down.

    That's ok with me.
     
  17. Deanimator

    Deanimator Member

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    I just didn't see the benefit in practice. Of course if I bought one, it'd be converted to single action before it fired a shot.
     
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  18. Walt Sherrill

    Walt Sherrill Member

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    It should be noted, too, that the (pre-Omega) CZs -- unless something is amiss (out of spec, etc -- can't be carried with the safety engaged while the hammer rests on the half-cock notch. The Tanfoglio version of the CZ pattern allows it, however. I have no experience with the Omega design, and haven't seen this functionality addressed in discussion, but assume the Omega functions in the same manner.

    A few CZs will allow the safety to be engaged while on the half-cock notch, but I've always been told that something is not up to spec. I've had MANY, many CZs over the years, and none allowed this. (That aspect of the internal mechanism is above my pay grade.)

    I've also been told that the earliest pre-B CZs didn't have the half-cock notch. I had one of those, and didn't understand what had happened to the safety notch. (I later came to think that THAT particular CZ may have been one of the rare short-rail models; but that wasn't until long after I had traded it away. (That one had a really crappy enamel-like finish, but a wonderful trigger.).
     
  19. TheProf

    TheProf Member

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    One more question if I may...
    If lowering the hammer fully down....

    Trigger is pulled while controlling the fall of the hammer to the full down position. Then trigger released.

    At this point, is the firing pin now actively blocking the firing pin?

    Or should I have released trigger before the hammer is fully at rest (but past the half cock position) to activate the firing pin block?
     
  20. unclenunzie
    • Contributing Member

    unclenunzie Contributing Member

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    As soon as the hammer has cleared the single-action sear (under your careful control), you should release the trigger. This will allow the drop safety to secure the firing pin as you maintain control and lower the hammer to half-cock.
     
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  21. TheProf

    TheProf Member

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    Thanks!
     
  22. 5-SHOTS

    5-SHOTS Member

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    The correct procedure to manually decock a pistol like the CZ 75B ends up with the hammer in the half cock position anyway.
     
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  23. 5-SHOTS

    5-SHOTS Member

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    Yes, once the trigger is released the firing pin safety is activated again. The problem is that if the hammer slips from your fingers while keeping the trigger pressed, the gun will go bang.

    If you release the trigger a moment after the hammer is "free", you'll go in the half cock position (correct procedure, which is infact the same procedure to decock a cocked DA/SA revolver).
     
  24. Walt Sherrill

    Walt Sherrill Member

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    You can also put a finger from the other hand between the hammer and the slide as the hammer is lowered... You can use the tip of the smallest finger of the other hand.. Doing that AND releasing the trigger after the hammer has moved forward a small distance means that when the hammer is lowered against the finger, and the finger is withdrawn, there's just not enough hammer force to cause any type of primer ignition.

    It's not a hard to do as it seems, and you can control the hammer by using the strong hand thumb or by controlling it with the thumb and forefinger of the off hand. After a while, you'll find yourself doing it one-handedly.

    Accidents while manually decocking a gun almost never happen, because people doing it practice it with an empty gun and learn to do it well before really trying to do it with a loaded gun. (And keeping the gun pointed down range or at the ground in front of you as you decock also makes the likelihood of harm even less likely.)
     
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  25. bikerdoc

    bikerdoc Moderator Staff Member

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    I use Cocked and locked , but nothing wrong with half cocked.
     
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