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Do you do a "Fluff and Buff", on new pistols

Discussion in 'Handguns: Autoloaders' started by gym, May 3, 2008.

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  1. gym

    gym member

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    I was looking at this link, hxxp://www.goldenloki.com/guns/keltec/prep.htm, I removed the (tt, in Http), so the link isn't live, as per forum regs. It shows and explains how to do a 'fluff and buff', on a new pistol, prior to using it, or it can be done at any time if needed. I haven't done it on my keltec, PF-9 as it still is virgin in the box. Is this something that is more common than I assumed, having polished a few feed ramps and done some minor repairs, installing sights, and the like, in my day, should the average guy attempt to use 400-600 grain sandpaper on a pistol. I understand that this may be the equivelant of shooting a couple hundred rounds to "break in" a new weapon, Is it easy to feel how much is enough, my concern is overdoing it. And what pitfalls can those who have done this routine on their pistols suggest ahead of time. Thanks, the term made me laugh, I must admit.
     
  2. wyocarp

    wyocarp Member

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    I fluff and buff every gun I buy. I try to do so as soon as possible. Just the other week I bought a Ruger LCP and the gun store and I wondered about if the magazine from the Keltec would feed in the Ruger LCP since it did fit. The gun store person was shocked when I called them back within 30 minutes saying that I had put about 50 rounds throught he LCP with the Keltec magazine. That's how I fluff and buff, and I try to never let more than a couple of hours go by between the purchase and the fluff and buff treatment.
     
  3. chris in va

    chris in va Member

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    The only time I've done it is on my P11. It wasn't having a problem, I just did it as a precaution and...found the work interesting. Didn't use sandpaper, just my Dremel.

    See, I'm not picky about how a gun looks per se. If the internals are rough, it doesn't bother me as long as the gun is 100% functional and shoots straight. Heck you should see what my Saiga looks like inside. But it works.

    The P11 did have some 'less than refined' spots on the slide, and I just buffed the burrs out for the heck of it. Otherwise just shooting a few hundred 9mm's would smooth it out, but I'm not rich.
     
  4. CWL

    CWL Member

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    I've only done it to my Kel-Tec P32 just to learn the gun. Probably didn't need it but it was fun.

    Never needed it on anything else. Just shot & cleaned 'em for breaking-in.

    Now if you are talking customizing a gun, I've done plenty of that.
     
  5. mainmech48

    mainmech48 Member

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    Nope. I don't do anything but clean and lube until at least 500 rds.

    If there are functional issues, that's what warranties are for. If there aren't, it takes at least that much shooting for me to determine what exactly I want or need to "improve".

    IMO, most "fluff 'n' buff" and even professional action jobs are primarily just applying artificial "wear" to surfaces. It generally takes a good bit of shooting for the spots which might actually benefit most from the attention to show up, so why not do that first?

    "Tuning" an action is another matter that I prefer to leave to the pros. It's been my experience that getting it can be a whole lot more expensive than buying it.
     
  6. Idano

    Idano Member

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    Nope, that is what shooting it for,
     
  7. Car Knocker

    Car Knocker Member

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    I subscribe to the "If it's not broke, don't fix it" school of thought. If the pistol is operating as it's supposed to, the chances are a fluff and buff done just for the heck of it may well affect reliability.
     
  8. kentucky bucky

    kentucky bucky Member

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    Just my Keltec p11. It felt like an expensive gun after I slicked it down. It's never failed before or after the fluff & buff, but it felt like everything was "grinding" when I cycled it.
     
  9. The Lone Haranguer

    The Lone Haranguer Member

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    I do not. And most certainly not before I've even shot them.

    This F&B business reminds me of gunsmiths' "reliability packages." If the handgun is reliable to start with, it needs no additional work; if it is not reliable it is faulty and needs to be repaired.
     
  10. Nicky Santoro

    Nicky Santoro Member

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    Lots of good opinions in this thread. That being said, opinions vary. I shoot mine before I do anything in case there are major faults necessitating a return. Fortunately, I've never had a pistol that required return. If the feed ramp requires attention, and typically they all do, IMO, I strip to the frame then buff it with 400 wrapped around a finger and wet with honing oil. After that I go to 800 then 1000. By that time it is a slick as snot on a door knob. After a little touch up blue and some CLP, I consider it done and good to go. As I said, opinions vary.
     
  11. nj.piney

    nj.piney Member

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    most manuf. recommend a certain number of rounds for break in, this just shortens the break in time.its a lot cheaper.
     
  12. jocko

    jocko Member

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    fluff and buff

    if in doubt, don't do it, but if you have any gun savvy, you aren't hurting one thing and IMO actually speeding up the process of gun reliability. Certainly polishing the feed ramp and barrel chamber is a postive thing to do. I did not touch my Ruger lcp for the first 500 rounds out of it andit was flaeless, then when I clenaed it, I did the ramp and chamber with a good polish.I just felt better from doing it. Most good guns don't require any f & B and will work out of the box and actualy get better as more rounds go out the barrel. the F & B just speeds up the process...
     
  13. conw

    conw Member

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    The P11 was my first "personal" handgun and after 75-100 rounds or so I F&B'd it. I'm glad I did, because I understand the workings a lot better now. It's pretty simple, and definitely made it smoother. Is it 100% necessary, no.

    I would recommend shooting at least 50 rounds through it first, because that way you can tell where it really needs smoothing as it will wear.

    I also sanded down the molds in the plastic and the grooves where the grip is melded together. That made it look and feel better, too.

    It's a good exercise simply because you get acquainted with the gun, and--IMO--it helps ensure reliability. I really recommend using a "keyboard cleaner" canned air product, too.
     
  14. Rustynuts

    Rustynuts Member

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    Mild F&B and full ramp polish on every new gun I have.
     
  15. MyG23

    MyG23 Member

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    excuse my ignorance, but what is a "fluff and buff" ?
     
  16. blackcash88

    blackcash88 member

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    Never needed to do any sort of fluff and buff until getting involved with a couple of POS Kel-Tec P3ATs. :fire:
     
  17. MyG23

    MyG23 Member

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    also, could someone please tell me how to change my username ?
     
  18. blackcash88

    blackcash88 member

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    PM one of the moderators. They can probably do it.
     
  19. Big Boomer

    Big Boomer Member

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    depends on the gun, for my 1911's yes, for the others no.

    I do a full strip and lube and check for any burrs and such but other than that nothing much.

    The 1911's I do a feed ramp polish and a throat polish till shes a mirror and may buff the mags and well in certain areas to make sure the mags drop free. I will also touch up any needed machining marks that are just not pretty inside the slide if I feel like it.

    My others auto's like my XD has had nothing done to it at all.

    Revolvers, a bit of a different story. But besides just strip and check for burrs not much.
     
  20. funny book flapjack

    funny book flapjack Member

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    Thought about it when I picked up my P-11.

    Field stripped it, cleaned it, & ran a bunch of WWB value boxes through it first instead. No troubles, so I didn't worry about it after that.
     
  21. CA2005

    CA2005 Member

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    huh huh....you said fluff and buff
     
  22. rbernie
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    rbernie Member

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    Pretty much.

    I actually didn't mind doing a once-over on my P32; for the cost of the unit, I didn't expect to get a finely finished product. I felt it was worth my while to at least take it down and remove any of the rough edges from things.

    But frankly, that's where I stop. I refuse to buy a pistol that's not a fighting pistol, and I refuse to accept any pistol into that categorization that needs 'help' just to function properly out of the box.
     
  23. Rustynuts

    Rustynuts Member

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    Basically stripping the gun down, some go field strip, some do a detailed. Then basically any part that slides of rubs on another gets a mild sanding and/or polishing/buffing. Plastic parts get any excess flashing trimmed down as well. As stated it's kind of an accelerated break in for wear. I tend to go pretty mild with mine with coarsest sanding at 800 grit. I mostly use 1500 & 2000 followed by some Flitz polish. For sanding, try to keep the motion inline with how the part moves. A couple swipes of high grit sandpapr can work wonders with smoothing things down without worry of excess sanding. I typically do the frame/slide interace, plus a little on the barrel (I don't do a mirror polish all over like some), but I do try to get the feed ramp almost mirrored. Again without removing too much material.

    Use 1000 grit or higher plus the polish and you'd have to be at it for hours before you could do any damage to the metal parts.

    Here's a link to a nice Fluff article for Keltecs (which arguably need them out of the box!)

    http://www.ktog.org/tecwerks12a.htm
     
  24. lee n. field

    lee n. field Member

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    I've done it on a few, and on those, I can't honestly say it's resolved any problems.
     
  25. varoadking

    varoadking Member

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    Every one of 'em - if nothing else, a feedramp polish job with a Dremel, felt wheel and Flitz, immediately after purchase...

    ...and then I clean 'em, lube 'em, and head to the range...
     
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