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Do you love a gun?

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by jamesjames, Mar 8, 2019.

  1. jamesjames

    jamesjames Member

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    I have wondered if I was crazy or if it was just me... but there are guns that I love.

    Now, the word “love” gets bandied around a good bit, but I’m talking about a deep connection where the lines and curves, the feel and balance in your hand, the shape, proportions, history, legacy, and design speak to a deep sense of inner joy and provide an abiding satisfaction and fulfillment.

    I’ve always wished gunwriters could somehow covey something much deeper than the stats and accuracy, function and fit/finish. Inspiration and joy are personal and poetic, literary and metaphysical, profoundly emotional and transcendent experiences that words often fail to do justice to.

    We do the “just one gun” thread almost every month ad nauseum, but we never really get into depth with how a gun has a transformational power to be a beautiful extension of our hand and expression of personal power and skill.

    I’m going to shock many in starting out by singing the praises of a Smith 329PD. It’s blackened scandium aluminum is just dead in terms of finish. That atomic symbol on the frame is hideous. The internal lock is terrible. But this gun somehow fits my hand and becomes a perfectly balanced extension of my arm. Other N frames are too heavy to enjoy handling. I’ve fitted it with Karl Nil walnut combat grips that are perfectly hand-filling and much better at gripping and dispersing recoil and not snagging on clothing. It rides in a Milt Sparks PMK. I carry it with Hornady Critical Defense .44 specials in town and Buffalo Bore Reduced Recoil .44 magnums in the field. It shoots like a dream. It carries like a dream. It’s my constant companion. It speaks to me with a perfection of form and function that gives me joy and pride and puts a smile on my face every time I see it or pick it up.

    Maybe tapping away on a cell phone is no way to try to wax poetic about something as transcendent and spiritual as love. The love of a firearm is simple and uncomplicated. Like the love of a dog, it’s pure and unconditional (and of course, a one-sided reverence). As a vessel for containing our aspirations for a disciplined and responsible masculinity, an ordered world where we have a better control over our fate, it’s a small and self-contained symbol and tool of power, skill, and restraint. Learning to carry and use these terrible tools with great care and responsibility marks us as owners and perhsps slightly better masters of our own personal destiny.

    What stories, memories , or aspirations are stirred in your very being by that favorite shooting iron?
     
  2. Zebraranger

    Zebraranger Member

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    I don't know about love, but I have a very strong connection to my Walther P99 that I purchased in the early 2000's. Its been 100% reliable all these years and I shoot it better than any of my other guns.
    Revolvers, I have some strong feelings about the Security Six too.
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  3. Catcar67

    Catcar67 Member

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    Yes, I have a love for a gun. It's just an old 1927 Savage Model 99 in 30-30. It isn't anything special as far as a collector. It was, and still is, my Dad's gun. He's been gone since 1993 but it will always be his rifle. He hunted deer and elk with it in the 30s and 40s. He gave it to me for a graduation present in 1960. I carried on my first blacktail deer hunt in western WA in 1964 and bagged my first deer. It was my go-to rifle when I hunted the timber stands. It suffered some woodwork damage in a house fire some years ago and rather that make it into a wall hanger I replaced woodwork and springs then re-blued the metalwork. For fast action shooting in the brush it couldn't be beat. For about 10 years of blacktail deer and elk hunting it was there and most of the animals harvested were one shot only. My sons aren't hunters but my daughter is so the Savage will be handed down to her. She already has my Mom's pre-'64 30-30 Winchester but that's another story.
     
  4. paulsj

    paulsj Member

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    I don't love inanimate objects, but Colt 1911 rail gun is quintessential "Man Gun".
     
  5. Bruce D Pease

    Bruce D Pease Member

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    My all time favorite is my M1. The lines and balance of this gun are perfect. Mine is an April 1943 Springfield Armory, that also makes it special because my grandfather worked at the Armory then, and my mom was an inspector. It is a possibility, although remote, that one or both of them could have had a roll in its manufacture. It was rebarreled after the Korean Police Action, as it has a
    Springfield 1954 barrel. It’s muzzle erosion is 0<1, and it’s throat is 1+. It’s more accurate than my eyes are now. I carried one for five yrs in the Marines. Last one I carried for them was an H&R M14.... I did not like that, for many reasons, but that’s another tale for another time.
     
  6. JR24

    JR24 Member

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    I might say it to get a point across occasionally but no. Even great guns are just tools to me. Good tools, but still tools.

    Same way with cars or similar, I just dont get emotionally attached to them. Never named a car or anything.

    That said, a few of my guns have emotional memories attached to them, and I'd be sad to lose that memory.
     
  7. Trunk Monkey

    Trunk Monkey Member

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    I don't have any emotional attachment to any of my guns. It might be different if they were heirlooms but they're not.
     
  8. seanie!

    seanie! Member

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    I love my AK. It started as a Saiga .223 Sporter that I tweaked and converted bit by bit to suit my needs and shooting style over the course of a decade or so. Now, it's completely impractical, ridiculously front heavy, and looks almost nothing like an AK, but it's my baby, and it's always fun to shoot.
     

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  9. Snowdog

    Snowdog Member

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    I am attracted to the aesthetics of some firearms such as the Colt 1903, 1911 and some L & J frame revolvers (such as the 686 and M36/60).
     
    Last edited: Mar 9, 2019
  10. bannockburn

    bannockburn Member

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    Not necessarily love but I do have a very strong attachment to three guns in particular. First would be my customized Colt Combat Commander, my Browning Hi-Power, and finally my Beretta Model 70S. I have had all of them for quite a number of years now and have been more than satisfied with their reliability, durability, and accuracy. It's a rare trip to the range when I don't have at least two of them with me!

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  11. Officers'Wife

    Officers'Wife Member

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    My grandmother told me never to be so foolish as to love something that would never be capable of returning that love. While she was referring to Bill Parker, a firearm would also qualify.

    I have several tools of various descriptions – including firearms – that I have a deep appreciation for. The longevity and dependability of my great grandfather's Winchester for example. Over a hundred and twenty years old it still performs duty admirably. My Colt Commander that I take with me wherever I go. The bow that I made out of a hedge apple branch when I was thirteen that I killed my first deer with. It could be said I have a sentimental attachment to these objects… But it's more from the fond memories the objects are reminders of.

    Imagine if you will, a warm day in early April, a clumsy, shy thirteen-year-old girl full of self doubts at the rifle range with her grandfather. For three magazines out of an old Winchester the old man stoically shakes his head, corrects the child's stance, breathing and posture until finally the last three shots ring the metal plate behind the center of the target. The old man takes the carbine away from the girl opens the action and inspects it that hands her back to his adopted grandchild saying – "you might as well keep this, girl, you do better with it than I can." I'm sure you can see that while the object is now a prized possession, the love that possession engenders is for that old man with the hard, gruff exterior and a heart as warm as that spring day. So now understand, I do not love the gun, but the gun reminds me of how much I was loved when the old man was alive.
     
  12. Bandit67

    Bandit67 Member

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    I pretty much love them all but my first gun, an 870 Wingmaster 12 ga.,
    is my most loved. My dad gave it to me when I was 12 in 1976. I used it for all small game and killed my first deer with it in 1980. It was a 4 pt. I have got at least 50 deer with it since including last year's little 5 pt. I have many other guns now but that 870 sits in the front of the safe.
     
  13. Rembrandt

    Rembrandt Member

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    Original Greek has three meanings for the word "Love". The word does not apply to an inanimate object of any kind. Over the course of time people have misused and confused the original meaning. There are far better descriptive words that should have been used, poorly educated applications and blending of cultures have lost the original intent.

    We all misuse words either through ignorance or laziness. Reading the dictionary for word definitions shows how far the literacy of our society has decayed since Daniel Webster first attempted to give us some guidelines and word meanings. Speaks volumes about our education system.



    "Agapao": This is the action of totally being committed to the well being of others without regard for their worthiness even unto death. (Giving your life to save someone else)

    "Phileo": This word translated "love" refers to fervent love for another person. (Phildelphia, city of brotherly love, an affection for others)

    "Eros" This is a noun and refers to sexual love. (Erotic physical)



     
  14. Bandit67

    Bandit67 Member

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    Ok. I really, really "like" my 870.
     
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  15. tubeshooter

    tubeshooter Member

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    I used to think I loved some of my guns...
    Then I got a good dog for the first time in a long time.


    I love that dog more than all the guns put together.
    That being said, I am fairly fond of a lot of the guns.
     
  16. jar

    jar Member

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    No.
     
  17. Bones741

    Bones741 Member

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    "I love lamp!"
    -Brick ,anchorman 2004

    If you've seen the movie you'll get the context.

    Guns are inanimate objects. So can't really love them.yes I greatly enjoy them and would never part with them . May have extra attatchment to a few guns that were from family members who have passed, but I don't "love" the gun ,it more of a sentimental thing.
     
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  18. Bandit67

    Bandit67 Member

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    Now we're debating the meaning of "Love". Lol. I think we know what the OP meant. It's not the same as the way we feel about our spouse, kids, or dog. By the way, I love pizza and chocolate ice cream.
     
  19. FL-NC

    FL-NC Member

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    I was in love with a gun once, but it didn't last and I had to let it go back to where it came from. Colt M4A1 carbine, named W3439079.
     
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  20. jamesjames

    jamesjames Member

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    When you guys can stay focused on the intent of the thread, you reveal and discover the deep emotional connection the firearm provides. When it’s a story about a conduit to a gradfather’s legacy, it can move the reader to tears. We have strong and complex attachments to these things (one of the reasons critics call us “gun nuts”).

    Thank you for sharing your insights and digging in to the meat of this.
     
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  21. 460Shooter

    460Shooter Member

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    I tend to inappropriately use that word to convey that I really like a particular gun, but no I don’t love inanimate objects.

    Honestly this ranks right up there with calling a gun sexy on my silliness meter.
     
    Last edited: Mar 9, 2019
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  22. Odd Job

    Odd Job Moderator Staff Member

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    For me the emotion is more towards sentiment, or circumstances surrounding the acquisition or use of the gun.
    I don't feel that way about any of my guns, but there were two knives that had special meaning for me (both of which were stolen). I understand the "attachment" though.
     
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  23. 375supermag

    375supermag Member

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    No...
    Don't love inanimate objects.
    I appreciate them, but no love. They are just useful tools.
     
  24. Labguy47

    Labguy47 Member

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    I have a strong connection to the memories of my first gun a Ruger Standard 6”. Because my dad went halves with me on my 11 b-day.

    I have a S&W mod 10 that shoots naturally for me. And an FNP-9 that I am fond of for its volume and rate of fire .

    The one I use the most is my .22 WMR, and if I had to have a strong connection to a gun it would be that one. Food, protection, clothing it does it all.
     
    Last edited: Mar 9, 2019
  25. RedlegRick

    RedlegRick Member

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    I like all of mine, but ultimately, they are just tools and at some point they'll all get traded/sold so I can get others.
     
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