Drawing from a holster with a retention strap

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J-Bar

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I don't visit this forum often, so I apologize if this is a dead horse subject, but I hope you all will be patient with my ignorance.

I am a cowboy action competitor, so I am used to drawing revolvers from open top holsters that have no retaining mechanism. The thumb breaks on our holsters are pulled off the hammers before the timer starts, so nothing impedes the draw.

But today at the practice range I tried using a snubbie .38 revolver in a strong side belt holster which had a snap strap over the trigger guard. Getting interested in concealed carry, don't you know... I was not trying to set a speed record for draw and fire; I was just trying to find a way to present the gun efficiently, and never quite made it.

So before I teach myself bad habits, I would appreciate some pointers from those who have mastered this kind of equipment. If you care to, please give a detailed description of how to draw a revolver from a holster when it is secured with a retaining strap...which fingers go where and when?

Thanks.
 
I've always felt that for CCW the holster should not have and active restraint systems; thumbsnaps, straps, buttons or other impedements to the draw. The holster should be fitted to the gun carried and perhaps have a passive restraint like a tension screw, but for a smooth draw that is already going to be slowed by having to move clothing out of the way, no further retention is necessary.
 
It works best with a thumb break holster. The strap snaps inside the holster. Holsters with outside straps don't do well for concealed. You can get a holster fitted to your gun and you don't need a strap.
 
I’m not an expert by any means but let me say this.

A long time ago I worked for a block layer who was teaching me how to lay block he always said “You work on doing it right, speed will come.”

When I practice my “presentation” I practice by the numbers one step at a time and develop muscle memory. IOW I work on doing it right.

When I go to the range to qualify I seem to make my times and I’ve never forgot to disengage the retention strap
 
The thumb breaks on our holsters are pulled off the hammers before the timer starts
What you moved out of the way isn't usually referred to as a thumb break, but usually as a retention loop.

A thumb break holster will usually have the inner half as part of the back or the holster and the outer half as part of the holster body...like this

290.jpg


a snubbie .38 revolver in a strong side belt holster which had a snap strap over the trigger guard.
That is one of the worst setups for a safety strap as it interferes with gripping the gun. Of this horrible setup, this is one of the better ones:

I24608.jpg


...but you'd be much better off with a holster that retained the gun by going over the hammer, like this:

scabbard-3.jpg



So before I teach myself bad habits, I would appreciate some pointers from those who have mastered this kind of equipment. If you care to, please give a detailed description of how to draw a revolver from a holster when it is secured with a retaining strap...which fingers go where and when?
The draw should start with
1. Establishing the strong hand firing grip on the gun while it is in the holster
2. Trigger finger straight along the holster, on the frame below the cylinder
3. Strong thumb releasing the thumb break by pressing on the snap joining the two pieces of leather
 
The revolver and holster were recently acquired in a trade, and the holster is a very old one, so I am not surprised it is a poor functional design, and I am not surprised that I was having difficulty. The thumb break I mentioned in reference to cowboy action shooting is simply a leather thong loop over the hammer spur of the single action old western style revolver, which is pulled off the hammer before the timer starts, so it is not a factor in drawing the gun. The thumb breaks in these photos are much more secure and well designed. I appreciate the details.
 
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